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NEWS
By CURTIS L. TAYLOR and CURTIS L. TAYLOR,NEWSDAY | February 17, 2006
A screening billed as the first online glaucoma test to receive federal clearance will be offered free during the next week to promote low vision awareness month. The test will be available at lighthouse.org/glaucoma through Wednesday, according to Jeanine Moss, communications director for the nonprofit Lighthouse International, based in Manhattan. The organization, which works for vision rehabilitation, and the test developer are sponsoring the site. Glaucoma is a chronic, degenerative disease that causes silent, irreversible damage to the optic nerve and can lead to blindness.
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NEWS
By STEPHANIE BEASLEY AND JENNIFER SKALKA and STEPHANIE BEASLEY AND JENNIFER SKALKA,SUN REPORTERS | July 1, 2006
Kristen Cox remembers failing her eye test in the fifth grade. Though she was fittted for eyeglasses, she knew her vision -- and her world -- was changing. Because around the same time, Cox, a Republican selected this week to run for lieutenant governor with Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., noticed that when she would look up at the night sky, the stars would disappear. She started to think that's what stars do -- vanish. But she and her family soon learned that she had Stargardt disease. It was her vision that was fading.
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NEWS
March 1, 2005
UNTIL THE mattress-paved highway or the skull-mounted airbag hits the market, helmets are pretty much the only option for keeping motorcyclists safe from brain damage. It's really this simple: Riders who don't wear helmets are far more likely to suffer a serious head injury in a crash. So we're mystified to learn that the Maryland General Assembly is seriously considering abolishing the state's mandatory helmet law for anyone 21 or older. Last year, the very same proposal passed the Senate.
NEWS
By CURTIS L. TAYLOR and CURTIS L. TAYLOR,NEWSDAY | February 17, 2006
A screening billed as the first online glaucoma test to receive federal clearance will be offered free during the next week to promote low vision awareness month. The test will be available at lighthouse.org/glaucoma through Wednesday, according to Jeanine Moss, communications director for the nonprofit Lighthouse International, based in Manhattan. The organization, which works for vision rehabilitation, and the test developer are sponsoring the site. Glaucoma is a chronic, degenerative disease that causes silent, irreversible damage to the optic nerve and can lead to blindness.
FEATURES
By Sandra Blakeslee and Sandra Blakeslee,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 27, 2000
For nearly 500 years, people have been gazing at Leonardo da Vinci's portrait of the Mona Lisa with a sense of bafflement. First she is smiling. Then the smile fades. A moment later the smile returns only to disappear again. What is with this lady's face? How did the great painter capture such a mysterious expression, and why haven't other artists copied it? The Italians have a word to explain Mona Lisa's smile: Sfumato. It means blurry, ambiguous and up to the imagination. But now, according to Dr. Margaret Livingstone, a Harvard neuroscientist, there is another, more concrete explanation.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | May 19, 1993
Last year, Jerre Musser, a retired math teacher fro Taneytown, took a senior citizens driving course called 55 Alive.Mrs. Musser said taking the class improved her driving.Now, she said, "I am able to predict what's coming up and act, rather than react."So now Mrs. Musser, 66, teaches the course, which is sponsored several times a year by the American Association of Retired Persons.About 20 seniors attended the two-day course taught by Mrs. Musser Thursday and Friday at the public library in Westminster.
NEWS
By STEPHANIE BEASLEY AND JENNIFER SKALKA and STEPHANIE BEASLEY AND JENNIFER SKALKA,SUN REPORTERS | July 1, 2006
Kristen Cox remembers failing her eye test in the fifth grade. Though she was fittted for eyeglasses, she knew her vision -- and her world -- was changing. Because around the same time, Cox, a Republican selected this week to run for lieutenant governor with Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., noticed that when she would look up at the night sky, the stars would disappear. She started to think that's what stars do -- vanish. But she and her family soon learned that she had Stargardt disease. It was her vision that was fading.
NEWS
By Mary Beth Faller and Mary Beth Faller,STAMFORD ADVOCATE | April 8, 2001
Glaucoma is called the "thief of sight" because it can blind its victims painlessly and irreversibly. There are no symptoms until victims begin to lose their vision. Treatment can slow the progression of the disease but cannot reverse the damage. Eye doctors are worried about an impending increase in the number of glaucoma patients. Those at highest risk are people older than 60, African Americans older than 40, and those with a family history of the disease. "As our population ages, we have more people entering into the glaucoma age group," says Dr. Robert J. Fucigna, a Stamford, Conn.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Staff Writer | September 8, 1993
A Crofton motorist who struck and killed a man as he drove home from a bar was convicted yesterday in Circuit Court of homicide while intoxicated.Michael T. Bardowski, 40, of the 1800 block of Sharwood Place, will be sentenced Nov. 1 by Judge Raymond Thieme Jr. He faces up to five years in prison.The Jan. 8 accident killed Gregg I. Getz, 28, of the 13000 block of Drake Drive in Rockville, who was standing in the middle of Route 424 after another accident, in which his car rear-ended another car."
SPORTS
By Dave Glassman and Dave Glassman,Special to The Evening Sun | November 5, 1990
If you threw a cream puff 30 yards downfield and 5 feet over his head, Juan Dorsey probably would leap and catch it without breaking off a single crumb.Not that the area's leading wide receiver (54 catches, 778 yards, 14.4 average, six touchdowns) is looking for snacks to fill out his 6-foot-2, 180-pound body. Nor has his father, a pastry chef, ever worked him out by tossing desserts in the air. The Glenelg senior just likes to catch things in his strong, yet soft, hands: baseballs (as starting shortstop)
NEWS
March 1, 2005
UNTIL THE mattress-paved highway or the skull-mounted airbag hits the market, helmets are pretty much the only option for keeping motorcyclists safe from brain damage. It's really this simple: Riders who don't wear helmets are far more likely to suffer a serious head injury in a crash. So we're mystified to learn that the Maryland General Assembly is seriously considering abolishing the state's mandatory helmet law for anyone 21 or older. Last year, the very same proposal passed the Senate.
NEWS
By Mary Beth Faller and Mary Beth Faller,STAMFORD ADVOCATE | April 8, 2001
Glaucoma is called the "thief of sight" because it can blind its victims painlessly and irreversibly. There are no symptoms until victims begin to lose their vision. Treatment can slow the progression of the disease but cannot reverse the damage. Eye doctors are worried about an impending increase in the number of glaucoma patients. Those at highest risk are people older than 60, African Americans older than 40, and those with a family history of the disease. "As our population ages, we have more people entering into the glaucoma age group," says Dr. Robert J. Fucigna, a Stamford, Conn.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 6, 2001
Like a hazy dawn that explodes into dazzling sunrise, "The Day I Became a Woman," an Iranian movie made up of three linked stories set near the same arid shoreline, takes 20 minutes to burst into fierce, inspired filmmaking. In the first part, director Marziyeh Meshkini traces the last carefree hours of a girl on her 9th birthday - the day her mother and grandmother drape her in a chador from head to toe and declare her a woman. In the third part, Meshkini follows an old lady who flies to a resort city, buys every comfort or convenience from a refrigerator to a living-room set, and lays it all out on the sand.
FEATURES
By Sandra Blakeslee and Sandra Blakeslee,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 27, 2000
For nearly 500 years, people have been gazing at Leonardo da Vinci's portrait of the Mona Lisa with a sense of bafflement. First she is smiling. Then the smile fades. A moment later the smile returns only to disappear again. What is with this lady's face? How did the great painter capture such a mysterious expression, and why haven't other artists copied it? The Italians have a word to explain Mona Lisa's smile: Sfumato. It means blurry, ambiguous and up to the imagination. But now, according to Dr. Margaret Livingstone, a Harvard neuroscientist, there is another, more concrete explanation.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Staff Writer | September 8, 1993
A Crofton motorist who struck and killed a man as he drove home from a bar was convicted yesterday in Circuit Court of homicide while intoxicated.Michael T. Bardowski, 40, of the 1800 block of Sharwood Place, will be sentenced Nov. 1 by Judge Raymond Thieme Jr. He faces up to five years in prison.The Jan. 8 accident killed Gregg I. Getz, 28, of the 13000 block of Drake Drive in Rockville, who was standing in the middle of Route 424 after another accident, in which his car rear-ended another car."
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | May 19, 1993
Last year, Jerre Musser, a retired math teacher fro Taneytown, took a senior citizens driving course called 55 Alive.Mrs. Musser said taking the class improved her driving.Now, she said, "I am able to predict what's coming up and act, rather than react."So now Mrs. Musser, 66, teaches the course, which is sponsored several times a year by the American Association of Retired Persons.About 20 seniors attended the two-day course taught by Mrs. Musser Thursday and Friday at the public library in Westminster.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 11, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Two Air Force pilots died yesterday when their F-111F fighter-bomber crashed on a pre-dawn training mission in the Arabian Peninsula -- the latest in a rash of accidents that have killed as many as 31 Americans since President Bush dispatched U.S. forces to the Persian Gulf two months ago.The Navy also ended its search for eight Marines lost and presumed killed in Monday's crash of two UH-1N Huey helicopters over the North Arabian Sea, Marine...
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 6, 2001
Like a hazy dawn that explodes into dazzling sunrise, "The Day I Became a Woman," an Iranian movie made up of three linked stories set near the same arid shoreline, takes 20 minutes to burst into fierce, inspired filmmaking. In the first part, director Marziyeh Meshkini traces the last carefree hours of a girl on her 9th birthday - the day her mother and grandmother drape her in a chador from head to toe and declare her a woman. In the third part, Meshkini follows an old lady who flies to a resort city, buys every comfort or convenience from a refrigerator to a living-room set, and lays it all out on the sand.
SPORTS
By Dave Glassman and Dave Glassman,Special to The Evening Sun | November 5, 1990
If you threw a cream puff 30 yards downfield and 5 feet over his head, Juan Dorsey probably would leap and catch it without breaking off a single crumb.Not that the area's leading wide receiver (54 catches, 778 yards, 14.4 average, six touchdowns) is looking for snacks to fill out his 6-foot-2, 180-pound body. Nor has his father, a pastry chef, ever worked him out by tossing desserts in the air. The Glenelg senior just likes to catch things in his strong, yet soft, hands: baseballs (as starting shortstop)
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 11, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Two Air Force pilots died yesterday when their F-111F fighter-bomber crashed on a pre-dawn training mission in the Arabian Peninsula -- the latest in a rash of accidents that have killed as many as 31 Americans since President Bush dispatched U.S. forces to the Persian Gulf two months ago.The Navy also ended its search for eight Marines lost and presumed killed in Monday's crash of two UH-1N Huey helicopters over the North Arabian Sea, Marine...
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