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By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Knight-Ridder/Tribune News Service | July 23, 1995
Q: My husband, who was in the U.S. Navy in Paris in 1939, purchased at the time a 1-ounce bottle of Jean Patou "Joy" perfume that has never been opened and is still in its original box. Is it of any value?A: A book that offers an unbelievable perfume-bottle education is "The Art of Perfume -- Discovering and Collecting Perfume Bottles," by Christie Mayer Lefkowith. It is available in a hardcover, large, dust-jacketed edition for $66 postpaid (New York State residents add $4.95 sales tax) from Christie Mayer Inc., FDR Station, P.O. Box 5200, New York, N.Y. 10150-5200.
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By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN REPORTER | November 29, 2005
As hobbies go, privy hunting is not pretty. It's not like, say, remodeling a '55 Chevy. It takes a different searching soul to dedicate months to digging 8 feet down into century-old outhouses in search of ... what? And do we really want to unearth what is buried in those old pits? These aren't ancient art galleries, after all. Introducing Spencer Henderson, Baltimore privy hunter, different soul. Equipped with a rake and shovel, sensible work clothes, a "Police K-9" visor and a vibrant mustache, the 55-year-old Henderson spent his summer in the trenches of Fells Point.
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By Lita Solis-Cohenand Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohenand Sally Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers | February 14, 1993
Since the time of St. Valentine centuries ago, perfume has been a gift of love, and the luxury and novelty of its vessel have been part of the pleasure. Perfume bottle collectors can celebrate Valentine's Day every day, passionately pursuing every sort of bottle from the tiniest antique scent flask to the largest "factice" filled with colored water sitting on perfume counters.Like hounds on a hunt, collectors have the scent of "commercials," bottles made for perfumers and couturiers and bought filled with a fragrance.
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By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2005
Over the next two weeks, Mark Lach will make sure a cherub that once adorned the doomed ship Titanic is displayed just right in a grand staircase that soon will grace the Maryland Science Center's exhibit floor. He'll be certain to showcase a door that once hung on the ship's D-deck through which only first-class passengers had been permitted and a child's marble, which was found decades later on the cold, ocean floor. Those who attend Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, when it comes to the Maryland Science Center next month will also be able to visit a memorial room to see a list of which of the 2,228 passengers perished after the vessel hit an iceberg in the Atlantic on April 15, 1912.
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By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | March 16, 1997
Rene Lalique was a famous French goldsmith, jeweler, glassmaker and artist who lived from 1860 to 1945.At first Lalique designed jewelry, including some for the actress Sarah Bernhardt. He used many semiprecious stones and also glass enameling and pieces of horn. Much of Bernhardt's jewelry was designed to look like flowers, insects and snakes.In the 1890s, Lalique began experimenting with glass for use in jewelry. By 1908 he was making molded glass perfume bottles for Francois Coty.Lalique continued to make all types of glass figures, vases and bowls, using clear and opalescent glass.
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By N.Y. Times | September 11, 1991
NEW YORK -- Fire eaters, mimes, dancing nuns, Roman centurions and a high-school marching band from Long Island. What could it be? What else: a perfume introduction.Next week, Saks Fifth Avenue will transform its main floor to introduce Moschino, the new fragrance by the Italian designer Franco Moschino. Patti LaBelle will sing, wine will served from perfume bottles and Moschino will enter with look-alikes of Queen Elizabeth and the pope.
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By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | July 21, 1996
Perfume bottles shaped like Oriental men, soup tureens that look like huge shells and vases covered with human and animal heads were among the unusual designs produced by French porcelain manufacturers in the 19th century. When the rococo style was revived, the affluent demanded elaborate porcelains.Jacob Petit was one manufacturer who met the demand. His firm in Fontainebleau, France, made vases, clock cases, figurines, candlesticks and dishes.Now, Petit's small perfume bottles encrusted with three-dimensional flowers as well as Oriental-inspired designs for figurines and decorative wares are in great demand.
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By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2005
Over the next two weeks, Mark Lach will make sure a cherub that once adorned the doomed ship Titanic is displayed just right in a grand staircase that soon will grace the Maryland Science Center's exhibit floor. He'll be certain to showcase a door that once hung on the ship's D-deck through which only first-class passengers had been permitted and a child's marble, which was found decades later on the cold, ocean floor. Those who attend Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, when it comes to the Maryland Science Center next month will also be able to visit a memorial room to see a list of which of the 2,228 passengers perished after the vessel hit an iceberg in the Atlantic on April 15, 1912.
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By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | May 7, 1995
There are almost as many kinds of collectors as there are collections.Some people accumulate objects of a certain category almost by accident, and are thus indifferent to how they're displayed. Others are secret hoarders, stashing their finds in attics or cellars where the collection can be kept from the eyes of outsiders. Then there are those who collect for the sake of creating beauty in their surroundings -- not only for their personal enjoyment, but as something to be shared with others.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | November 12, 1990
Near the entrance to "Lalique: A Century of Glass for a Modern World" at the Baltimore Museum of Art (through Jan. 13) one comes upon Rene Lalique's "Suzanne" (about 1924), described in the show's catalog as "a glass statuette modeled as a neoclassical maiden."Suzanne is virtually nude, her little bosom thrust out in front and her little bottom in back, head turned to the side in a kind of mock modesty, one leg raised in what looks like a Charleston kick, arms outstretched from which a flowing glass drapery falls.
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By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | March 16, 1997
Rene Lalique was a famous French goldsmith, jeweler, glassmaker and artist who lived from 1860 to 1945.At first Lalique designed jewelry, including some for the actress Sarah Bernhardt. He used many semiprecious stones and also glass enameling and pieces of horn. Much of Bernhardt's jewelry was designed to look like flowers, insects and snakes.In the 1890s, Lalique began experimenting with glass for use in jewelry. By 1908 he was making molded glass perfume bottles for Francois Coty.Lalique continued to make all types of glass figures, vases and bowls, using clear and opalescent glass.
FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | July 21, 1996
Perfume bottles shaped like Oriental men, soup tureens that look like huge shells and vases covered with human and animal heads were among the unusual designs produced by French porcelain manufacturers in the 19th century. When the rococo style was revived, the affluent demanded elaborate porcelains.Jacob Petit was one manufacturer who met the demand. His firm in Fontainebleau, France, made vases, clock cases, figurines, candlesticks and dishes.Now, Petit's small perfume bottles encrusted with three-dimensional flowers as well as Oriental-inspired designs for figurines and decorative wares are in great demand.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 24, 1996
I am interested in the history of perfume and the art of the perfumer.A good place to explore the world of French perfume and its history is the town of Grasse, which has been a perfume-making center for centuries. The city is in the hills about 10 miles north of Cannes on the Riviera.The Tourism Office in Grasse offers a variety of guided tours that focus on the perfume industry.One tour, at $34 a person, includes a walk around the old city, a cocktail at the Villa Fragonard or the Congress Palace, lunch and a visit at one of three museums.
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By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Knight-Ridder/Tribune News Service | July 23, 1995
Q: My husband, who was in the U.S. Navy in Paris in 1939, purchased at the time a 1-ounce bottle of Jean Patou "Joy" perfume that has never been opened and is still in its original box. Is it of any value?A: A book that offers an unbelievable perfume-bottle education is "The Art of Perfume -- Discovering and Collecting Perfume Bottles," by Christie Mayer Lefkowith. It is available in a hardcover, large, dust-jacketed edition for $66 postpaid (New York State residents add $4.95 sales tax) from Christie Mayer Inc., FDR Station, P.O. Box 5200, New York, N.Y. 10150-5200.
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By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | May 7, 1995
There are almost as many kinds of collectors as there are collections.Some people accumulate objects of a certain category almost by accident, and are thus indifferent to how they're displayed. Others are secret hoarders, stashing their finds in attics or cellars where the collection can be kept from the eyes of outsiders. Then there are those who collect for the sake of creating beauty in their surroundings -- not only for their personal enjoyment, but as something to be shared with others.
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By Cynthia Hanson and Cynthia Hanson,Contributing Writer | February 28, 1993
While no one was looking, "country" interiors became cosmopolitan.Open any design magazine and you'll see overstuffed sofas, painted furniture and such unlikely accessories as boulders and Oriental artifacts.Only a few years ago, the style that came to be known as country was as predictable as the "cheatin' heart" lyrics of a Hank Williams ditty.Into every house marched a platoon of decorative ducks, bunnies, cows and sheep. When these critters weren't holding interiors hostage, the culprits were gingham hearts and calico bows.
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By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Evening Sun Staff | May 1, 1991
Like most experts on antiques and collectibles, Emyl Jenkins will tell you the real value of any family treasure is in its personal meaning to you. But, at the same time, the nationally recognized art historian and appraisal expert acknowledges that you shouldn't go throwing out Grandma's old perfume bottles just because you never cared for that scent she wore.Recognizing the value of various objects is something that comes in time with hands-on experience, says Jenkins. But there are some basic guidelines to keep in mind if you are a beginner investigating some of those old household items.
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By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | November 15, 1990
Rene Lalique was a bridging figure in the history of modern decorative arts, moving as he did from making exquisite jewelry in the Art Nouveau era of the 1890s to making elegant glass objects in the Art Deco era of the 1920s.His progression, as well as the legacy carried on by his son and granddaughter, can be seen in an exhibit at the Baltimore Museum of Art, "Lalique: A Century of Glass for a Modern World."The earlier and more impressive half of Lalique's career, when he crafted that to-die-for Art Nouveau jewelry, was surveyed in an exhibit at The Walters Art Gallery in 1985.
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By Lita Solis-Cohenand Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohenand Sally Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers | February 14, 1993
Since the time of St. Valentine centuries ago, perfume has been a gift of love, and the luxury and novelty of its vessel have been part of the pleasure. Perfume bottle collectors can celebrate Valentine's Day every day, passionately pursuing every sort of bottle from the tiniest antique scent flask to the largest "factice" filled with colored water sitting on perfume counters.Like hounds on a hunt, collectors have the scent of "commercials," bottles made for perfumers and couturiers and bought filled with a fragrance.
FEATURES
By N.Y. Times | September 11, 1991
NEW YORK -- Fire eaters, mimes, dancing nuns, Roman centurions and a high-school marching band from Long Island. What could it be? What else: a perfume introduction.Next week, Saks Fifth Avenue will transform its main floor to introduce Moschino, the new fragrance by the Italian designer Franco Moschino. Patti LaBelle will sing, wine will served from perfume bottles and Moschino will enter with look-alikes of Queen Elizabeth and the pope.
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