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Performance Standards

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NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | November 20, 1990
The state's new, unflattering report on public school performance is the first step in an ambitious, five-year improvement program aimed at holding schools accountable.And state education officials say that accountability is a key element in winning increased public aid for education."We have to be able to tell the public there is a payoff," said Joseph L. Shilling, state school superintendent, who released the 60-page Maryland School Performance Program Report yesterday.The report, prompted by a governor's commission on school performance, showed that Maryland schools failed to meet all but two of the state's eight performance standards in the last school year.
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NEWS
Staff Reports | June 24, 2014
Sykesville's Main Street Association has been designated as an accredited National Main Street Program for meeting the commercial district revitalization performance standards set by a subsidiary of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Performance standards are evaluated by the Department of Housing and Community Development/Main Street Maryland on issues such as fostering public-private partnerships, tracking progress and preserving historic buildings. “We are extremely honored to have received this accreditation again this year,” said Ivy Wells, director of Economic Development and Main Street Manager for Sykesville.
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NEWS
Staff Reports | June 24, 2014
Sykesville's Main Street Association has been designated as an accredited National Main Street Program for meeting the commercial district revitalization performance standards set by a subsidiary of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Performance standards are evaluated by the Department of Housing and Community Development/Main Street Maryland on issues such as fostering public-private partnerships, tracking progress and preserving historic buildings. “We are extremely honored to have received this accreditation again this year,” said Ivy Wells, director of Economic Development and Main Street Manager for Sykesville.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2010
Baltimore schools CEO Andres Alonso debated national school officials Thursday about how to attract, retain and reward competent teachers, a discussion he deemed vital as teacher contract negotiations continue and state and federal programs place more emphasis on teacher performance. In a forum hosted by the ACLU of Maryland Education Reform Project, school leaders discussed a recently released study by the National Council on Teacher Quality, which showed that Baltimore's teachers should be paid more but have too long been afforded overly generous benefits and evaluations from principals.
NEWS
April 13, 2008
Havre de Grace Main Street has been accredited as a 2008 National Main Street Program for meeting the commercial district revitalization performance standards set by the National Trust Main Street Center, officials said. The national center works in partnership with Coordinating Main Street Programs nationwide to identify local programs that meet 10 basic performance standards. Standards include developing a mission, fostering strong public-private partnerships, securing an operating budget, tracking economic progress and preserving historic buildings.
NEWS
By Amy Macht | March 19, 1991
THE GREATER Baltimore Committee lately has been demanding performance standards in many areas, including school reform and social programs. So it is all the more surprising that Robert Keller, GBC's president, promotes the Central Light Rail Line (Other Voices, March 5), a project which falls remarkably short of nationally recognized performance standards.Contrary to Keller's unsubstantiated claim, those who criticize the light rail project are not opposed to mass transit, any more than Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney was opposed to a proper defense when he vetoed the A-12 as a white elephant.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | November 21, 1990
No one called it a spectacular performance. But Carroll educators were pleased that the county school system had the second highest overall academic scores in the Maryland School Performance Program.Rated "satisfactory" in reading, writing and citizenship, Carroll only failed to reach the state-set goal in math. Carroll fell just 0.7 percentage points short of the 80 percent standard."I'm especially pleased how we look in this first report," Superintendent R. Edward Shilling said.The state performance standards, released this week, set levels school districts should meet in order to be rated "satisfactory" or "excellent."
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1996
Harford County is trying to create a $1 million fund that would make it the first school system in the state to offer financial incentives aimed at improving student performance.The program, to begin in the 1997-1998 school year, would funnel grants and other payments to the county's 49 schools over a two-year period and would complement a planned $2.75 million state program also intended to help schools meet Maryland performance standards.Unlike the state's program, which is intended to help schools that already show improvement, Harford County's might weigh socioeconomic factors in deciding which schools get the money.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Staff Writer | July 28, 1993
State education officials could seize control of Maryland's worst schools -- even putting them in the hands of private contractors -- under a sweeping proposal that received preliminary approval from the state Board of Education yesterday.If the board gives final approval to the proposal, Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick will receive a powerful new tool in enforcing tough performance standards mandated by the state in recent years.Those standards, outlined in the annual Maryland School Performance Report or school "report card," include the results of new, custom-designed tests; middle school attendance figures; and high school dropout and graduation test figures.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | October 28, 1990
The Carroll Board of Education will be presented Tuesday with a blueprint for local school reform that is likely to include recommendations for increased student achievement and performance.Unveiling 71 recommendations for reform will be a task force comprised of 70 parents, teachers, students, administrators and community leaders.The meeting will be at 7:30 p.m. at Westminster High School auditorium.Although task force members have been hush-hush about the recommendations, Carroll educators said they expect an emphasis on student achievement because of the Maryland School Performance Program, which will set performance standards for the state's school systems.
NEWS
April 13, 2008
Havre de Grace Main Street has been accredited as a 2008 National Main Street Program for meeting the commercial district revitalization performance standards set by the National Trust Main Street Center, officials said. The national center works in partnership with Coordinating Main Street Programs nationwide to identify local programs that meet 10 basic performance standards. Standards include developing a mission, fostering strong public-private partnerships, securing an operating budget, tracking economic progress and preserving historic buildings.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2005
THOUSANDS OF Social Security Administration workers approved a four-year labor contract this week, ending months of negotiations that deeply divided employees and caused them to reject an identical proposal on the first go-round, the chief negotiator for the union said. Social Security spokesman Mark Lassiter said that the agency would not comment on the changes until it completed a 30-day review of the contract and leaders signed it. Federal workers cannot strike. When management and employees reach a stalemate - as SSA did after employees first rejected the plan - disputes can be taken to the Federal Service Impasse Panel, a neutral third party.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 19, 2002
A week after the St. Petersburg Philharmonic's visit, I still find the rich, soulful sound of that orchestra floating in my head. Another after-effect lingers. It's the realization that the artistic bar has been raised in Baltimore. Before the Russians played in Meyerhoff Symphony Hall with their music director Yuri Temirkanov, I don't think local audiences or members of Temirkanov's other ensemble, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, really understood what all the fuss was about. Everyone had heard how Temirkanov was used to high standards and was insisting on them here, but I think some folks considered such talk as hyperbolic, or merely an excuse to justify changes in the BSO. Until the Philharmonic actually performed on the BSO's home turf, they could ignore the possibility that maybe Temirkanov and his players really were on an exalted level.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | July 22, 2001
After six months, the state's newly created Home Builder Registration Unit is sure of one thing: There are many more people out there building homes than anyone expected. As of last week, 2,184 builders had registered with the unit. It is the first time in the history of the state that government officials have been able to get a head count of the number of people constructing new homes. When the legislation was being crafted in 2000, it was estimated that the number of builders or entities signing up would be perhaps half of what it is today.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | February 11, 2001
The number of builders who have signed up with the state's newly formed Home Builder Registration Unit has exceeded preliminary estimates, according to the attorney general's office. "It is an awful lot -- 1,500, perhaps as many as 2,000 [ultimately] -- and it will give us the ability to deal with the things that we couldn't deal with before," Maryland Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. said last week. The unit was created last year by the General Assembly to register and track builders who operate in the state, which had not been done before.
NEWS
By Kalman R. Hettleman | January 17, 2000
MARYLAND has a nationally acclaimed school accountability program. But it's a one-way street. The state board of education and department of education hold local school systems accountable through rigorous state performance tests (MSPAP). However, virtually no attention has been paid to holding state education officials responsible for their overall record in improving student achievement. That record has been far below satisfactory and warrants closer scrutiny than it has received. The statewide drop in MSPAP scores last year is only the tip of the iceberg of unfulfilled expectations.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | November 12, 1991
Despite improvements, local school districts still have a long way to go in meeting minimum state performance standards, state Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick said today."
NEWS
November 17, 1992
The state's annual "report card" shows Maryland schools are making progress -- and yet they have a long way to go.The third annual Maryland School Performance Report, issued yesterday by the state Department of Education, finds the state's schools, overall, meeting 7 of 13 performance standards -- up from 5 of 13 last year and 2 of 8 two years ago.Two of the state's 24 school districts -- Carroll and Howard counties -- met all 13 standards. Three others -- Frederick, Garrett and Montgomery -- met 12 of 13.State school officials were also forthright in pointing out where more work is needed:* Only 73 percent of ninth graders passed the functional math test.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1996
Harford County is trying to create a $1 million fund that would make it the first school system in the state to offer financial incentives aimed at improving student performance.The program, to begin in the 1997-1998 school year, would funnel grants and other payments to the county's 49 schools over a two-year period and would complement a planned $2.75 million state program also intended to help schools meet Maryland performance standards.Unlike the state's program, which is intended to help schools that already show improvement, Harford County's might weigh socioeconomic factors in deciding which schools get the money.
NEWS
July 15, 1994
Performance goals needed for AmpreyWhat are parents of children in the Baltimore City schools to make of the recent pay raise and four-year contract for the school superintendent, Walter Amprey? Why a 12 percent ($15,000) increase when teachers are receiving a 4 percent increase? Why an expense account increase from $5,000 to $15,000?Why give permission to collect unlimited fees for speaking engagements, which can only diminish his availability for "superintending"?Why does he get a four-year guaranteed contract with neither a proposed plan for educational improvement nor any demonstrable administrative accomplishment?
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