Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPerformance Of Mozart
IN THE NEWS

Performance Of Mozart

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | November 7, 1996
Any performance of Mozart's Requiem by the Baltimore Choral Arts Society and its music director, Tom Hall, would be worth hearing. But their performance this Saturday at the Meyerhoff sounds particularly promising.Mozart left the "Requiem" unfinished when he died in 1791, and Hall will be performing a new edition of this beloved work by Robert Levin. To describe Levin as a great Mozart scholar would be accurate, but it would also be to do him an injustice. He's also an extraordinary pianist (on both the fortepiano and the modern grand)
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
In Peter Shaffer's wildly fanciful play “Amadeus,” the mediocre and oh-so jealous composer Salieri describes the moment he realized the genius of his nemesis - hearing a phrase in Mozart's Serenade for Winds that was “filled with such longing … it had me trembling.” Any Mozart fan is bound to have a similar example, some little moment of Mozart that seems impossibly beautiful, unusually affecting. For me, it comes in the Adagio of the Clarinet Concerto, when the soloist begins a tender descending melody that gets gently answered by the orchestra.
Advertisement
NEWS
By STEPHEN WIGLER and STEPHEN WIGLER,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 14, 1996
Schubert "Trout Quintet," performed by pianist Emmanuel Ax, cellist Yo-Yo Ma, violinist Pamela Frank, violist Rebecca Young, bassist Edgar Meyer; Schubert "Arpeggione Sonata," performed by Ma and Ax; "The Trout," performed by soprano Barbara Bonney and Ax (Sony Classical 61964). Schubert "Trout Quintet," performed by pianist Alfred Brendel, violinist Thomas Zehetmair, violist Tabbea Zimmermann, cellist Richard Duven, bassist Peter Riegelbaur; Mozart, Quartet in G minor, performed by Brendel, Zehetmair, Zimmermann, Duven (Philips 446001)
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2009
In its English offering this week of Mozart's "The Magic Flute," Opera AACC calls upon the talents of Anne Arundel Community College faculty members, Maryland-based singers and 15 students from county elementary, middle and high schools. The shows, including today's at 3 p.m., will be presented at AACC's Pascal Center for the Performing Arts. James Harp, the artistic administrator of the Baltimore Opera, is the stage director of AACC's production, and Anna Binneweg, AACC's music director, is music director and conductor.
FEATURES
By Stephan Wigler and Stephan Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 30, 1997
The Baltimore Symphony and its music director, David Zinman, have of late had to play a great deal of unfamiliar and difficult music. For that reason, and perhaps because of last weekend's three recording sessions with pianist Helene Grimaud, conductor and orchestra may have been understandably tired.Whatever the reasons, they were below form last night in Meyerhoff Hall on the first half of their program when they performed Mozart's Concerto No. 9 in E-flat (K. 271) with pianist Emanuel Ax.Mozart's works, particularly his piano concertos, have always been one of the great strengths of this orchestra and conductor.
FEATURES
By Kenneth Meltzer and Kenneth Meltzer,Special to The Sun | August 2, 1994
During last Thursday's penultimate Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Summerfest concert, pianist Christian Zacharias offered a splendid rendition of Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 15. The composer's 21st Piano Concerto is an even greater work, and Saturday evening at the Meyerhoff, Mr. Zacharias rose to the occasion with a performance that ranks among the most probing and brilliantly executed in this listener's memory.Once again Mr. Zacharias surmounted Mozart's considerable technical demands, intensified all the more by consistently fleet tempos, with astonishing ease.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 10, 1996
Easy Mozart doesn't exist, and the composer's last piano concerto may be the most difficult Mozart of all. The Concerto No. 27 in B-flat Major (K. 595) was written in the composer's final year, and it is all too easy to romanticize it as a concerto of foreboding.Richard Goode did not fall into that trap last night when he performed K. 595 with David Zinman and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra in Meyerhoff Hall. But it's difficult to capture this elusive work. Mozart's final concerto has snatches of self-awareness, even of self-parody, that interrupt the spontaneous flow characteristic of the composer's great earlier concertos.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 19, 1999
As he demonstrated last night in Meyerhoff Hall in an all-Mozart program, the second in the Baltimore Symphony's Summer MusicFest, Pinchas Zukerman has developed into a redoubtable conductor as well as a violinist whose playing combines sweetness with assertiveness, humanity with imagination and romantic intensity and feeling with classical impetus and delicacy.I don't remember a more inspirational performance of Mozart's Sonata in B-flat (K. 454) than that by Zukerman and his partner, pianist Jonathan Biss.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 16, 1996
TC Here are two hard tasks for a guest conductor.Perform music much associated with an orchestra's current and previous music directors and produce something his own.Turn that piece, even if as familiar to the ear as a Hershey's to the palate, into something strange and wild.Mariss Jansons accomplished those tasks in Berlioz' "Symphonie Fantastique" with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra in Meyerhoff Hall last night. The performance made one remember why it's called the "Fantastic Symphony."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | January 25, 1991
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's decision to bring Trevor Pinnock here to conduct Mozart's Requiem -- which he did last night in Meyerhoff Hall -- was made two years ago. It was a logical choice: Pinnock is a celebrated interpreter of 18th-century works, and the Requim is one of the greates of them.It was also a fortunate choice for what has turned out to be a most unfortunate time, when many young men and women in arms and many innocent civilians face death.The text of the Requiem encourages us to throw ourselves upon God's mercy, and we need it now more than at any time in the recent past.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 10, 2002
"Song," said the French writer-statesman Francois Rene de Chateaubriand, "is the daughter of prayer." And as prayerful introspection takes hold tomorrow in commemoration of the tragic events of Sept. 11, 2001, song will figure prominently in the ritual of tribute. Beginning at the international date line and radiating outward, performances of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's choral Requiem will begin in the world's various time zones at 8:46 a.m., the moment of the first attack on the World Trade Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and By Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | September 8, 2002
The healing power of music will be put to another test this week as people gather to remember 9 / 11. The remembrance will begin with music by Mozart, performed in more than 20 time zones around the globe at exactly 8:46 a.m. on Wednesday (the time the first plane tore into the World Trade Center). Fittingly, the specific work is Mozart's drama-rich Requiem, which he didn't live to finish -- a sobering metaphor for all those who died before their time on that shiny September morning. This idea of the "Rolling Requiem" originated some months ago with the Seattle Symphony Chorale and was quickly embraced by ensembles in at least 43 states and 24 countries.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 31, 2001
In a case of genuine tragedy, or, at the very least, extreme irony, Mozart apparently stopped composing a few measures into a section of the ancient Requiem Mass for the Dead called the "Lacrimosa." It's about the day of tears and mourning when the guilty shall be judged. The way Mozart began that music -- an arching, aching melodic line and a steady, somber beat, like the muffled march of a cortege -- has long haunted listeners. The image of this supreme genius dying at 35, unable to finish that Requiem, sensing within himself the deadly tread of the "Lacrimosa," is a difficult one to shake.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 19, 1999
As he demonstrated last night in Meyerhoff Hall in an all-Mozart program, the second in the Baltimore Symphony's Summer MusicFest, Pinchas Zukerman has developed into a redoubtable conductor as well as a violinist whose playing combines sweetness with assertiveness, humanity with imagination and romantic intensity and feeling with classical impetus and delicacy.I don't remember a more inspirational performance of Mozart's Sonata in B-flat (K. 454) than that by Zukerman and his partner, pianist Jonathan Biss.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 8, 1998
"I like an aria to fit a singer as perfectly as a well-tailored suit of clothes," Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart wrote in 1778.By the time he ascended the podium at Vienna's Burgtheater eight years later to conduct the premiere of his new opera "Le Nozze di Figaro," Mozart had designed a full line of musical apparel that still has the world buzzing over the sumptuousness of its workmanship.Indeed, "The Marriage of Figaro," which will be performed by the Annapolis Opera at 8 p.m. tomorrow and 3 p.m. Sunday at Maryland Hall, represents a great composer at the apex of his craft.
FEATURES
By Stephan Wigler and Stephan Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 30, 1997
The Baltimore Symphony and its music director, David Zinman, have of late had to play a great deal of unfamiliar and difficult music. For that reason, and perhaps because of last weekend's three recording sessions with pianist Helene Grimaud, conductor and orchestra may have been understandably tired.Whatever the reasons, they were below form last night in Meyerhoff Hall on the first half of their program when they performed Mozart's Concerto No. 9 in E-flat (K. 271) with pianist Emanuel Ax.Mozart's works, particularly his piano concertos, have always been one of the great strengths of this orchestra and conductor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and By Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | September 8, 2002
The healing power of music will be put to another test this week as people gather to remember 9 / 11. The remembrance will begin with music by Mozart, performed in more than 20 time zones around the globe at exactly 8:46 a.m. on Wednesday (the time the first plane tore into the World Trade Center). Fittingly, the specific work is Mozart's drama-rich Requiem, which he didn't live to finish -- a sobering metaphor for all those who died before their time on that shiny September morning. This idea of the "Rolling Requiem" originated some months ago with the Seattle Symphony Chorale and was quickly embraced by ensembles in at least 43 states and 24 countries.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | June 12, 1994
Mozart, Concerto No. 27 (K. 595) performed by pianist Mieczyslaw Horszowki and the Perpignan Festival Orchestra, Pablo Casals conducting; Mozart, Concerto No. 14 (K.449) performed by Eugene Istomin and the Perpignan Festival Orchestra, Casals conducting; Mozart, "Ch'io mi scordi di te?," performed by soprano Jennie Tourel, pianist Horszowski and the Perpignan Festival Chamber Orchestra, Casals conducting (Sony Classical SMK 58984); Brahms, Sextet in B-flat (opus 18), performed by violinists Isaac Stern and Alexander Schneider, violists Milton Katims and Milton Thomas, and cellists Pablo Casals and Madeline Foley; Brahms, Trio in B Major (opus 8)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | November 7, 1996
Any performance of Mozart's Requiem by the Baltimore Choral Arts Society and its music director, Tom Hall, would be worth hearing. But their performance this Saturday at the Meyerhoff sounds particularly promising.Mozart left the "Requiem" unfinished when he died in 1791, and Hall will be performing a new edition of this beloved work by Robert Levin. To describe Levin as a great Mozart scholar would be accurate, but it would also be to do him an injustice. He's also an extraordinary pianist (on both the fortepiano and the modern grand)
NEWS
By STEPHEN WIGLER and STEPHEN WIGLER,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 14, 1996
Schubert "Trout Quintet," performed by pianist Emmanuel Ax, cellist Yo-Yo Ma, violinist Pamela Frank, violist Rebecca Young, bassist Edgar Meyer; Schubert "Arpeggione Sonata," performed by Ma and Ax; "The Trout," performed by soprano Barbara Bonney and Ax (Sony Classical 61964). Schubert "Trout Quintet," performed by pianist Alfred Brendel, violinist Thomas Zehetmair, violist Tabbea Zimmermann, cellist Richard Duven, bassist Peter Riegelbaur; Mozart, Quartet in G minor, performed by Brendel, Zehetmair, Zimmermann, Duven (Philips 446001)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.