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Performance Audit

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By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | August 27, 1993
A joint meeting of the county commissioners and school board members found common ground yesterday on an issue that has been contentious in the past -- a performance audit.Such an audit could, depending on the final decisions by the two boards, examine questions such as whether the school system is operating efficiently and meeting its goals, and whether more county and school departments should merge.The two boards agreed to have staff members develop a definition for a performance audit.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Rebecca Pearce, who resigned under pressure in December as the director of the state's troubled health insurance exchange, was given five wage increases during her nearly 27-month tenure — including one scheduled raise after she stepped down, according to emails and letters provided by the exchange. Pearce's salary when she departed was $199,511, or $24,511 more than when she was hired. After a career in the insurance industry, Pearce was appointed in September 2011 to oversee the agency in charge of developing and running the state's online marketplace.
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NEWS
June 14, 2002
A performance audit of Carroll County's drug task force found exemplary recordkeeping, transactions conducted according to established policy and good procedures and practices. The nine-member task force, which was re-established three years ago, operates solely on funds and assets seized from illegal drug transactions. "Our operating account is good now, with many cases outstanding," said Sheriff Kenneth Tregoning, who requested the audit. "Our numbers continue to grow." Besides the Sheriff's Department, the task force includes Maryland State Police, Carroll County state's attorney and Westminster police.
NEWS
July 6, 2012
At last, it's heartening to see the momentum building to support the charter amendment requiring biennial city agency audits. The Sun editorial ("Ducking scrutiny," July 1) got it right. According to a recent Sun poll two weeks earlier, public support is overwhelming at 99 percent. It's not too late for the Baltimore City Council to pass the bill and allow the citizens of Baltimore to affirm the critical need for audited financial statements on a continuing basis. After decades of financial management horror stories in city agencies, establishing biennial audits would inaugurate sound government management fundamental to all. If Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Prince George's and Montgomery counties can perform audits annually, surely Baltimore government has no excuse for not performing audits every two years.
NEWS
August 24, 1999
NOW THAT the Carroll County commissioners and the Board of Education have agreed on a joint committee to plan a comprehensive performance audit of the school system, the first department to examine should be the troubled, overbudget construction operation.Members of the 10-person committee are qualified for the task, with a draft plan expected in January.While Susan Krebs argued persuasively for including a board member, preferably herself, on the committee, other members objected saying that could be seen as political interference or posturing: Carroll's five school board members are popularly elected.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | November 18, 1993
A timetable for auditing the Carroll County schools is emerging, as school and county staff draft a specific list of what an auditor will measure.The document is a "request for proposals," to be advertised once it is approved by the Board of Education and the county commissioners next month.A pre-bid conference is set for Jan. 17, and it is possible a consultant could be hired in March, start work in April and finish in May, said William Hyde, assistant superintendent of Carroll County schools.
NEWS
February 21, 1994
Carroll Commissioners Julia W. Gouge and Elmer C. Lippy did a pathetic job of making their case before the General Assembly for the authority to conduct a performance audit of the county's education department. The commissioners' failure guarantees this bill will be killed in committee, as it was last year. That's a shame because a well-executed performance audit would be invaluable in analyzing the school system's management practices and the effectiveness of its spending, which now consumes 53 percent of the county government's operating budget.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | December 16, 1992
Having agreed in principle to pull a fine-toothed comb through the school department, the Carroll County commissioners and school board had just one obstacle: the expected cost of $200,000 for a performance audit by an outside firm.But commissioners are now investigating whether an audit can be done in phases to stretch out the cost of examining the schools' operating efficiency.Commissioner Elmer C. Lippy suggested auditing one category at a time, starting with the areas in which the most money is spent, such as staffing.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | February 17, 1994
ANNAPOLIS -- Some House Ways and Means Committee members seemed puzzled yesterday about why Carroll County commissioners want to audit the county Board of Education's performance.Commissioners Julia W. Gouge and Elmer C. Lippy testified at a hearing in support of House Bill 548, which would give the county authority to audit the school board's management practices.The committee killed the same bill last year and is likely to do it again this year, one member said yesterday. Del. Thomas H. Hattery, a Frederick Democrat and Ways and Means Committee member, said after the hearing, "That bill doesn't have a prayer."
NEWS
December 30, 1992
After much political pulling and tugging, the Carroll County commissioners will get a performance audit of the schools they wanted. As proposed, the circumscribed audit will not be the comprehensive examination the commissioners originally sought, but it will be an opportunity to judge whether the public school system is being run efficiently and effectively.The question of conducting a performance audit of Carroll's schools has been around for three years. The commissioners and the school board could not agree who would control it. School board members accused the commissioners of poking their noses into business that rightfully belonged to the elected school board.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2003
The Maryland judiciary released a report yesterday that is highly critical of the bail bond system, saying that there is a "potential threat to public safety" and a "general disrespect for laws and rules governing bail bonds." In response to the report, Maryland Court of Appeals Chief Judge Robert M. Bell has ordered a task force to recommend ways to improve the bail system, which the judiciary decried in its report as having become "inadequate and antiquated." "We have identified lack of controls and procedures at each control point within the system," reads the internal audit, ordered by Bell and completed by the court.
NEWS
June 14, 2002
A performance audit of Carroll County's drug task force found exemplary recordkeeping, transactions conducted according to established policy and good procedures and practices. The nine-member task force, which was re-established three years ago, operates solely on funds and assets seized from illegal drug transactions. "Our operating account is good now, with many cases outstanding," said Sheriff Kenneth Tregoning, who requested the audit. "Our numbers continue to grow." Besides the Sheriff's Department, the task force includes Maryland State Police, Carroll County state's attorney and Westminster police.
NEWS
August 24, 1999
NOW THAT the Carroll County commissioners and the Board of Education have agreed on a joint committee to plan a comprehensive performance audit of the school system, the first department to examine should be the troubled, overbudget construction operation.Members of the 10-person committee are qualified for the task, with a draft plan expected in January.While Susan Krebs argued persuasively for including a board member, preferably herself, on the committee, other members objected saying that could be seen as political interference or posturing: Carroll's five school board members are popularly elected.
NEWS
August 22, 1999
Critics of Carroll's school board lack needed history, perspectiveAs much as I hesitate to get back into the fray, I can no longer sit back and read the allegations being made about our school system and say nothing. After 10 years as a member of the Carroll County Board of Education, perhaps I can add another perspective and a little history.Please realize that I also accept some of the responsibility and/or blame for problems the system faces that had their origin years earlier. But also understand that there are other sides to each issue than the ones presented by the newspaper or in other letters to the editor.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1999
If ever there was a time for reflection on the Carroll County school board, this may be it.Clearly divided over how to set up a performance audit of the system, how to establish goals and whether the board needs to renew its focus on student achievement, members are meeting in seclusion this afternoon, presumably to discuss prickly issues like these that stand in the way of unity.State law permits a school board to hold a retreat out of the public eye, but members may not make any official decisions or hold votes.
NEWS
By John Murphy and David L. Greene and John Murphy and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | July 15, 1999
Ending a four-month tug of war between the Carroll Board of Education and the county commissioners over how to review management of the school system, the two panels agreed yesterday to conduct a full performance audit of all school departments.Under the agreement, county government and schools staff will be equal partners in the effort, sharing the responsibility of developing guidelines for the audit and selecting an auditing firm to conduct it.That firm will review the performance of all school operations -- from administration to school construction to purchasing -- over three years.
NEWS
December 7, 1993
It is time for the Carroll County commissioners and the Board of Education to end their political skirmish over a proposed performance audit of the school system. The school board has backed itself into a bad position. Its strategy now should be to ensure that this audit doesn't become a device to undermine a well-functioning school system.Some history: In 1989, the school board reluctantly agreed to this performance audit. The argument for it was simple: Because education accounts for about 54 percent of the county's $130 million budget, an accounting of the effectiveness of school operations seemed prudent.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | February 18, 1993
ANNAPOLIS -- A House of Delegates Committee yesterday raised concerns about a bill that would give the Carroll County commissioners authority to conduct a performance audit of school management.Del. Theodore Levin, D-Baltimore, said the measure could place the commissioners "right smack dab in the middle of educational policy," allowing them oversight of contracts and school programs.Other members of the Ways and Means Committee expressed concerns that the commissioners would be overstepping their authority.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1999
Set to receive fewer state and county dollars than expected, the Carroll County Board of Education slashed yesterday about 30 of the 65 teacher positions it planned to add in the fall.The board's decision deals a blow to the school system's efforts to reduce class sizes -- particularly in the county's five high schools, where enrollment is expected to increase by 160 students this fall.Although administrators were hoping to hold average high school class size to about 25 students, that number could rise to 26 or 27 as a result of the cuts, said Gregory Eckles, supervisor of secondary schools.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | May 27, 1999
The county commissioners adopted a $265 million budget for fiscal year 2000 yesterday, and announced an 11th-hour change in their spending plans -- a $2.8 million slash in funding for Carroll's public schools.The budget includes $193 million to cover the day-to-day cost of county government and $72 million for capital improvements, including new schools and roads. The budget does not call for increases in property or income taxes. The new fiscal year begins July 1.The commissioners are withholding $1 million from the education budget until the school board agrees to hire an independent contractor to conduct a systemwide performance audit.
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