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NEWS
By Eric Siegel | January 5, 1991
Controversial performance artists Karen Finley and Holly Hughes, who were denied federal funds last year under an anti-obscenity statute, were awarded grants totaling $35,000 yesterday from the National Endowment for the Arts.Ms. Finley, an ardent feminist who often performs nude, and Ms. Hughes, a lesbian whose work often explores her own sexual identity, received $20,000 and $15,000 grants, respectively, for collaborative works with other artists based in New York.An NEA peer panel approved the grants last summer, but NEA Chairman John E. Frohnmayer held that decision up for review by a new panel.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
The idyllic scene Amanda Schmidt envisions on a recent Monday afternoon sounds less like a music festival and more like a serene, anything-goes camping trip with hundreds of open-minded friends, both new and old. She sees attendees playing basketball and taking dips in the pool, while others watch a stand-up comedian before heading to the woods to observe art installations. She pictures viewers enthralled by a theater performance in a barn, as many others watch Baltimore musicians like Dan Deacon, Matmos and other acts perform on multiple stages.
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NEWS
July 12, 1992
The ironies that flow from the intersection of art, law and politics were underscored again when a U.S. District Court judge in Los Angeles recently ruled that the government not only has no right to control the political content of federally funded art but may not even consider "general standards of decency" when awarding grants.The decision grew out of a lawsuit filed by four performance artists -- the so-called "NEA Four." They claimed the National Endowment for the Arts improperly rejected their grant applications on political grounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2012
A juke joint, a national park and a health spa for cars - all located within about five blocks of one another. For three days beginning Friday, a stretch of North Charles Street will be transformed into what just might be the coolest stretch of roadway in the U.S. That's the idea behind the Roadside Attractions corridor at Artscape, a collection of art objects, road signs, live performances and interactive installations designed to capture the ambience,...
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | December 25, 1992
People are always telling me to be merry this time of year, but merriment is hard to muster when your family get-togethers include a performance artist and an accordion player.The performance artist is a cousin, Margot, who generally arrives in the requisite baggy corduroys, black turtleneck and beret.Last year, in the middle of Christmas dinner, Margot announced: "I'm working on a new show . . ."Immediately a vague sense of unease descended upon the table, each person praying that the conversation would quickly veer onto another subject.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2012
A juke joint, a national park and a health spa for cars - all located within about five blocks of one another. For three days beginning Friday, a stretch of North Charles Street will be transformed into what just might be the coolest stretch of roadway in the U.S. That's the idea behind the Roadside Attractions corridor at Artscape, a collection of art objects, road signs, live performances and interactive installations designed to capture the ambience,...
NEWS
By Jill Hudson and Jill Hudson,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1998
Picture this: You're an artist of the storyteller/musician/flamenco-dancer sort, and you've got 10 minutes to show the audience everything you've got.That's 10 measly minutes to step out onto an empty stage, stare into the faces of a couple-dozen PTA members and special events coordinators, and hope they like what you do enough to hire you later.About three dozen area artists are taking their turns during the two-day Performing Arts Showcase in Ellicott City, competing for gigs at area elementary and middle schools, fairs, festivals and summer-stock performances -- anything they can get, just so they can perform.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
The idyllic scene Amanda Schmidt envisions on a recent Monday afternoon sounds less like a music festival and more like a serene, anything-goes camping trip with hundreds of open-minded friends, both new and old. She sees attendees playing basketball and taking dips in the pool, while others watch a stand-up comedian before heading to the woods to observe art installations. She pictures viewers enthralled by a theater performance in a barn, as many others watch Baltimore musicians like Dan Deacon, Matmos and other acts perform on multiple stages.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | August 22, 1993
A number of Baltimore area choruses and orchestras are preparing for their 1993-1994 season by holding auditions for new members.The Baltimore Choral Arts Society, directed by Tom Hall, will hold auditions Sept. 7 and 9 for experienced singers wishing to join the full chorus. The chorus rehearses Monday evenings and will perform 12 concerts this season, including works by Bach, Rossini and Rutter and an appearance with the King's Singers. To schedule an audition, call (410) 523-7070.The Baltimore Symphony Chorus, directed by Edward Polochick, will hold auditions for experienced singers throughout September.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Eric Siegel | January 18, 1991
Annie SprinkleWhen: Jan. 18 and 19, 9:30 p.m.Where: Maryland Art Place's 14Karat Cabaret, 218 W. Saratoga St.Tickets: $10.Call: 962-8565. Performance artist Annie Sprinkle has no trouble defining what her show is not."It's not burlesque -- I know because I've done that," says Ms. Sprinkle, a self-described "post-porn modernist" who is scheduled to appear at Maryland Art Place's 14Karat Cabaret tonight and tomorrow night."It's not pornography, either -- I've done that, too," she adds.What it is, she will tell you, is "very educational."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | February 15, 2009
The acrobats are lining up at Camden Yards. The elephants will gather at 1st Mariner Arena. Clowns can be found at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Baltimore will become one big circus this winter and spring, with an unprecedented number of events celebrating life in, around and under The Big Top. The list includes a circus-themed exhibit at the Baltimore Museum of Art, a "perverse" circus show at Theatre Project, and touring productions from both the Cirque...
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | March 3, 2008
Imagine letting perfect strangers order you around, mess with your head and demand that you do stupid, demeaning things just so they can laugh at you. After a while, even the most compliant souls would likely rebel. But not Rebecca Nagle, a sweet-faced, 21-year-old senior at the Maryland Institute College of Art, who's given new meaning to the phrase video on demand. If you go Rebecca Nagel's Fifteen Minutes starts Sunday and runs through April 11 at the Bunting Center, 1401 Mount Royal Ave. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Saturday; noon to 5 p.m. Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2004
Warm weather is here, and with its arrival comes a new season of outdoor festivals. From tiny ethnic celebrations to the annual blowout known as Artscape, these events have for years been a big part of Charm City's spring and summer entertainment calendar. And Sunday, the party tradition - with its classic array of tasty carnival treats, entertainment, and arts and crafts marketplaces - continues at the 19th annual Sowebo Arts Festival. Reliance on the usual festival fare makes this yearly fete much like many other local celebrations.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2002
Duane Howard Butts, a photographer and performance artist who loved his Fells Point neighborhood, died Saturday at Johns Hopkins Hospital of complications from cirrhosis. He was 40. Mr. Butts grew up in the Glen Oaks neighborhood of North Baltimore and graduated with honors from Boys' Latin School in 1980. He attended the University of California at Berkeley for a year and transferred to what is now Towson University, where he studied film. He worked as a waiter at several restaurants in Fells Point and Little Italy and was a free-lance photographer.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 26, 1999
Unlikely as it might sound, Eric Bogosian -- he of the angry, violent, profanity-strewn monologues -- has written a comedy of manners."Griller," which is making its East Coast debut at Center Stage under David Warren's direction, is Bogosian's take on morality, family and society in suburban America in the late 1990s.Compared to his monologues, "Griller," in which Bogosian does not appear, is surprisingly tame and ultimately affirmative. Bogosian, a counterculture performance artist and product of the anti-establishment late 1960s and early 1970s, has written a play promoting -- of all things -- family values.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 30, 1999
Eclecticism will be the rule at the Theatre Project for 1999-2000. The new season's offerings range from a gay film festival to two installments of "Danceteria" to a new work by controversial New York performance artist Holly Hughes."
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2002
Duane Howard Butts, a photographer and performance artist who loved his Fells Point neighborhood, died Saturday at Johns Hopkins Hospital of complications from cirrhosis. He was 40. Mr. Butts grew up in the Glen Oaks neighborhood of North Baltimore and graduated with honors from Boys' Latin School in 1980. He attended the University of California at Berkeley for a year and transferred to what is now Towson University, where he studied film. He worked as a waiter at several restaurants in Fells Point and Little Italy and was a free-lance photographer.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff Writer | August 29, 1994
After all these years on planet Earth, it would appear a routine matter: mounting a stage and telling stories about your life.You would explain what it's like to be gay and shunned, to watch your friends die by the bushel, to continue in lust and love. You would toss your vital statistics in the faces of cringing gay-bashers and complacent pols who just don't understand: We are all human, we all bleed, we all seek love. And slowly, the walls might crumble, and your differences accepted, yea celebrated.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson and Jill Hudson,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1998
Picture this: You're an artist of the storyteller/musician/flamenco-dancer sort, and you've got 10 minutes to show the audience everything you've got.That's 10 measly minutes to step out onto an empty stage, stare into the faces of a couple-dozen PTA members and special events coordinators, and hope they like what you do enough to hire you later.About three dozen area artists are taking their turns during the two-day Performing Arts Showcase in Ellicott City, competing for gigs at area elementary and middle schools, fairs, festivals and summer-stock performances -- anything they can get, just so they can perform.
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | September 14, 1997
Jeffrey N. Babcock, the man behind the cultural and entertainment programs of the Centennial Olympic Games, has been named executive director of the new Maryland Center for the Performing Arts in the College of Arts and Humanities at the University of Maryland, College Park.Babcock, a 25-year veteran arts-management executive, started in his new position Sept. 1.He envisions the performing arts center, scheduled to open in 1999, as a collaborative village where performing artists from different disciplines can train and create together and reach out to enrich the cultural life of the community.
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