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Perfect Balance

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SPORTS
By Victoria Lee, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
For senior running back Jonathan Rigaud, the decision to attend Johns Hopkins was easy. Having first heard in his junior year of high school about the winning combination of strong football and pre-medical programs that Hopkins offered, Rigaud saw the school as "the best of both worlds. " When the Blue Jays offered him the opportunity to play Division III football, Rigaud jumped at it. "I was considering going to Michigan or Miami just for academics, but when Hopkins came into the picture, I decided to come here.
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SPORTS
By Victoria Lee, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
For senior running back Jonathan Rigaud, the decision to attend Johns Hopkins was easy. Having first heard in his junior year of high school about the winning combination of strong football and pre-medical programs that Hopkins offered, Rigaud saw the school as "the best of both worlds. " When the Blue Jays offered him the opportunity to play Division III football, Rigaud jumped at it. "I was considering going to Michigan or Miami just for academics, but when Hopkins came into the picture, I decided to come here.
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SPORTS
By Glenn Graham and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
When twin brothers Jeremy and Michael DeGraffenreidt decided to pick musical instruments when they were younger, nobody close to them was surprised which ones they chose. Jeremy, brash and outgoing, wanted to bang on drums. Michael, laid back and analytical, was determined to master the saxophone. Their contrasting personalities can also be found at different ends of the soccer field at Loyola this season, making the No. 2 Dons a prime contender for this year's Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference championship.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2012
On the ride home from Gilman football practice one afternoon last fall, Henry Poggi listened to his father, Greyhounds coach Biff Poggi, go on and on about every little thing that had gone wrong that day with the linebackers. Finally, Henry said, "But Dad, I'm not a linebacker. " Those scenes weren't all that unusual until this year when Henry, now a senior, started driving himself home from practice. At home, however, things are different. Coach and player become simply father and son. There's not much talk about Gilman football.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2012
On the ride home from Gilman football practice one afternoon last fall, Henry Poggi listened to his father, Greyhounds coach Biff Poggi, go on and on about every little thing that had gone wrong that day with the linebackers. Finally, Henry said, "But Dad, I'm not a linebacker. " Those scenes weren't all that unusual until this year when Henry, now a senior, started driving himself home from practice. At home, however, things are different. Coach and player become simply father and son. There's not much talk about Gilman football.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | March 15, 2000
1998 Santa Barbara Winery Chardonnay, Santa Barbara County ($14). This brisk yet substantial white wine is a glowing example of a chardonnay that emphasizes freshness and fruit instead of passing off oak as character. The green apple, pear and nut flavors are vivid, punctuated by refreshing acidity. All is in perfect balance in this delicious wine from the cool climate of Santa Barbara County, which is rapidly becoming my favorite region for California chardonnay.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2011
There are many California chardonnays whose producers fancy that they've made a wine worth $30. Most are dead wrong. Many are hardly drinkable. But this rich white wine from Matanzas Creek is the real deal — a perfect balance of fruit and oak that almost restores my faith in this category. The flavors are no surprise — apple, pear, vanilla, lemon, toast — but they come with layer upon layer of complexity. Yes, this may be a bit of a splurge, but it would hold its own with wines twice its price.
NEWS
By Michael Hill | February 11, 1992
When Daniel Botkin looks at nature, he doesn't see a delicate, self-regulating structure that would be in perfect balance but for the presence of humanity. His vision is more that of a pinballmachine that people -- whether they know it or not -- are always playing, with balls that bounce in seemingly unpredictable directions as the warning flashes "TILT.""We look at the environment and think that if we would just leave it alone it would go to the best possible condition and remain there," said Dr. Botkin, a professor at the University of California at Santa Barbara who will speak tonight at the University of Maryland Baltimore County.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,tim.smith@baltsun.com | January 15, 2009
The recession - or is it the Great Depression II? - continues to take its toll on the local arts scene. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra laid off five of its 67 administrative employees and changed one full-time position to part-time yesterday in an effort to reduce expenditures. Those moves, along with a decision not to fill certain open staff positions, will save the BSO about $500,000. "We can see that the economic downturn is going to be a lot more prolonged than we had expected," president/CEO Paul Meecham said.
FEATURES
October 7, 1990
When F. David Holloway's Easton-based financial plannin firm expanded to Timonium, it meant at least three days every week in Baltimore. He found the perfect two-bedroom pied-a-terre at the Towers at Harbor Court. He envisionedstimulating evenings entertaining business associates in a sophisticated setting. His wife, Judy, had other ideas.Delighted with the romance of a harbor view and a home away from home, she imagined candlelit dinners for two and a cozy New Year's Eve with their two young sons enjoying a front-row seat for the fireworks.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
When twin brothers Jeremy and Michael DeGraffenreidt decided to pick musical instruments when they were younger, nobody close to them was surprised which ones they chose. Jeremy, brash and outgoing, wanted to bang on drums. Michael, laid back and analytical, was determined to master the saxophone. Their contrasting personalities can also be found at different ends of the soccer field at Loyola this season, making the No. 2 Dons a prime contender for this year's Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference championship.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2011
There are many California chardonnays whose producers fancy that they've made a wine worth $30. Most are dead wrong. Many are hardly drinkable. But this rich white wine from Matanzas Creek is the real deal — a perfect balance of fruit and oak that almost restores my faith in this category. The flavors are no surprise — apple, pear, vanilla, lemon, toast — but they come with layer upon layer of complexity. Yes, this may be a bit of a splurge, but it would hold its own with wines twice its price.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,tim.smith@baltsun.com | January 15, 2009
The recession - or is it the Great Depression II? - continues to take its toll on the local arts scene. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra laid off five of its 67 administrative employees and changed one full-time position to part-time yesterday in an effort to reduce expenditures. Those moves, along with a decision not to fill certain open staff positions, will save the BSO about $500,000. "We can see that the economic downturn is going to be a lot more prolonged than we had expected," president/CEO Paul Meecham said.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,special to the sun | June 1, 2008
Students at Rolling Knolls Elementary have designed a spot to seek inner peace. Or at least a spot to get away from it all. A group of 16 fifth-graders in the Gifted and Talented Program at the Annapolis-area school have built a 20-foot-by-20-foot labyrinth on one side of the property. Students had to learn about the history of labyrinths, surveying and grading land, drawing to scale, and creating a site plan. A labyrinth is not a maze, said Moira Plantier, a member of the labyrinth club.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | March 15, 2000
1998 Santa Barbara Winery Chardonnay, Santa Barbara County ($14). This brisk yet substantial white wine is a glowing example of a chardonnay that emphasizes freshness and fruit instead of passing off oak as character. The green apple, pear and nut flavors are vivid, punctuated by refreshing acidity. All is in perfect balance in this delicious wine from the cool climate of Santa Barbara County, which is rapidly becoming my favorite region for California chardonnay.
NEWS
By Michael Hill | February 11, 1992
When Daniel Botkin looks at nature, he doesn't see a delicate, self-regulating structure that would be in perfect balance but for the presence of humanity. His vision is more that of a pinballmachine that people -- whether they know it or not -- are always playing, with balls that bounce in seemingly unpredictable directions as the warning flashes "TILT.""We look at the environment and think that if we would just leave it alone it would go to the best possible condition and remain there," said Dr. Botkin, a professor at the University of California at Santa Barbara who will speak tonight at the University of Maryland Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,special to the sun | June 1, 2008
Students at Rolling Knolls Elementary have designed a spot to seek inner peace. Or at least a spot to get away from it all. A group of 16 fifth-graders in the Gifted and Talented Program at the Annapolis-area school have built a 20-foot-by-20-foot labyrinth on one side of the property. Students had to learn about the history of labyrinths, surveying and grading land, drawing to scale, and creating a site plan. A labyrinth is not a maze, said Moira Plantier, a member of the labyrinth club.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | January 19, 2000
1998 Chateau Ste. Michelle Chardonnay, Columbia Valley ($11). The 1998 chardonnay from this ultra-reliable Washington state winery is a worthy successor to the excellent 1997, also a Wine-of-the-Week selection. It's not a humongous chardonnay, and that's part of its magic. It's a crisp wine that's in perfect balance, with a certain zing that its California counterparts seldom achieve (at least for this remarkable price). The flavors are a moderately complex mix of apple, pear, light oak, nuts, yeast, lemon and white pepper.
FEATURES
October 7, 1990
When F. David Holloway's Easton-based financial plannin firm expanded to Timonium, it meant at least three days every week in Baltimore. He found the perfect two-bedroom pied-a-terre at the Towers at Harbor Court. He envisionedstimulating evenings entertaining business associates in a sophisticated setting. His wife, Judy, had other ideas.Delighted with the romance of a harbor view and a home away from home, she imagined candlelit dinners for two and a cozy New Year's Eve with their two young sons enjoying a front-row seat for the fireworks.
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