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Perestroika

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By Paul Abelsky | March 16, 2005
AS RUSSIA becomes embroiled in ever-more-contentious disputes with its neighbors, subdued discussion and articles in the Russian press marked a monumental date this month - the 20th anniversary of perestroika. In March 1985, Mikhail S. Gorbachev assumed the post of general secretary of the Communist Party, and he soon initiated a set of incremental political and economic reforms. These policies unleashed a process that brought about the disintegration of the Soviet Union and a new chapter of world history.
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NEWS
By JOHN C. BERSIA | October 21, 2005
ORLANDO, Fla. -- With the specter of extremism in all directions, accentuated by last week's attacks in Nalchik, Russia, and the recent Bali bombings, the world of the 21st century appears as violent and conflict-oriented as ever - if not worse. Add to those events the genocide in Darfur, Sudan; the surge in human trafficking; wars in Iraq and Afghanistan; the spread of weapons of mass destruction; disruption from unresolved self-determination issues; friction between the Koreas; narco-terrorism in the Americas; the Arab-Israeli crisis; multiple civil conflicts - the list goes on. How did it happen?
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NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | October 16, 1990
MOSCOW -- Mikhail S. Gorbachev, saying his Nobel Peace Prize is a recognition of perestroika's impact on the world, basked in international accolades yesterday but received ambivalent reviews in his deeply troubled homeland."
NEWS
By Paul Abelsky | March 16, 2005
AS RUSSIA becomes embroiled in ever-more-contentious disputes with its neighbors, subdued discussion and articles in the Russian press marked a monumental date this month - the 20th anniversary of perestroika. In March 1985, Mikhail S. Gorbachev assumed the post of general secretary of the Communist Party, and he soon initiated a set of incremental political and economic reforms. These policies unleashed a process that brought about the disintegration of the Soviet Union and a new chapter of world history.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | June 13, 1995
"Millennium Approaches," the first half of Tony Kushner's epic "Angels in America," is about things coming apart. The second half, "Perestroika," begins the difficult task of bringing them back together in new and unexpected ways.The most unexpected commingling is a remarkable scene in the last act in which the ghost of Ethel Rosenberg, the convicted and executed spy, says Kaddish, the Hebrew prayer for the dead, for the man who claimed to have been most responsible for sending her to the electric chair -- Roy Cohn.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | September 8, 1993
Peace between Israel and the Arabs is the most devastating news for the American weapons industry since perestroika.Compared to Jerusalem and the West Bank, the Golan problem is a piece of cake.Bill figured out how to balance the budget. Keep Congress home every other year.Noureddine Morceli runs the mile like it was all downhill.
NEWS
January 4, 1992
It's hard to be a puppet without a master, a believer whose god died, a follower with no leader, a bloc with no center, a copy whose role model renounced the role. While there are Communists who boast of new philosophies, it is harder for governments to do so.China's official Xinhua News Agency bitterly denounced reform in the former Soviet Union. It said that Mikhail S. Gorbachev's " 'new thinking,' 'glasnost,' and 'political pluralism' have brought political chaos, ethnic strife and economic crisis."
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 7, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Secretary of State James A. Baker III warned the Soviet Union yesterday that "perestroika cannot succeed at gunpoint" and said that its Foreign Ministry may have lost the clout to make lasting arms control deals."
NEWS
March 16, 1993
A few years ago, Mikhail S. Gorbachev's effort to revitalize the Soviet Union came to naught because so few could agree on the meaning of perestroika.Many people around Mr. Gorbachev understood the term as a mandate to modernize communism and give it a human face. But a sizable portion of the party bureaucracy disagreed, wanting perestroika [restructuring] to be a policy that would make the Soviet empire work again through Marxist-Leninist purism and harsh discipline.In the end, neither of those camps triumphed, of course.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | May 17, 1994
Three romantic musicals -- "Passion," "Beauty and the Beast" and a revival of "She Loves Me" -- racked up the largest number of Tony Award nominations yesterday in a season characterized by a paucity of new shows.Ten nominations went to "Passion" -- Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine's adaptation of a 19th-century Italian novel about obsessive love -- which opened on Broadway eight days ago. Nine each went to "Beauty and the Beast," the live-action version of the animated Disney film, and to "She Loves Me," based on a Hungarian play about a romance between two perfume store employees.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 21, 1999
MOSCOW -- In the days leading to her death yesterday, the Russian people finally granted Raisa Maximova Gorbachev what they had long denied her in life: their respect, their admiration, their sympathy.Raisa Gorbachev, who once annoyed the citizens of the Soviet Union as much as she charmed those of the West, died at 3 a.m. in a hospital in Muenster, Germany, where she was being treated for acute leukemia. She was 67.Her husband, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, who opened the Soviet Union to the rest of the world, was at her side -- as always.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 24, 1998
MOSCOW -- In his 97 years, Boris Yefimov has lived in the czarist-ruled Russian Empire, the Soviet dictatorship of the proletariat and democratic Russia. He has witnessed various revolutions, civil war, two world wars, Stalinist terror, a Cold War and one putsch.Boris Yefimov has watched it all, and he has not allowed his journey through time and history to proceed unremarked. For much of the century, he turned the great events and leaders of the day into political cartoons."I never expected it would be such a turbulent and cruel century," he says.
NEWS
By Hal Piper | June 23, 1996
AND IN SEVENTH place, with half a percent of the vote . . . Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev.Seventh place? Half a percent?Six years ago Gorbachev was master of the world's second superpower and of a nuclear arsenal capable of ending human life on the planet. He won the Nobel Peace Prize and was Time magazine's Man of the Decade. And now 199 out of every 200 voters want someone else for president. Gorbachev has become an Unperson -- just like all those people who were written out of history by Stalin's purges.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | June 13, 1995
"Millennium Approaches," the first half of Tony Kushner's epic "Angels in America," is about things coming apart. The second half, "Perestroika," begins the difficult task of bringing them back together in new and unexpected ways.The most unexpected commingling is a remarkable scene in the last act in which the ghost of Ethel Rosenberg, the convicted and executed spy, says Kaddish, the Hebrew prayer for the dead, for the man who claimed to have been most responsible for sending her to the electric chair -- Roy Cohn.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | May 17, 1994
Three romantic musicals -- "Passion," "Beauty and the Beast" and a revival of "She Loves Me" -- racked up the largest number of Tony Award nominations yesterday in a season characterized by a paucity of new shows.Ten nominations went to "Passion" -- Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine's adaptation of a 19th-century Italian novel about obsessive love -- which opened on Broadway eight days ago. Nine each went to "Beauty and the Beast," the live-action version of the animated Disney film, and to "She Loves Me," based on a Hungarian play about a romance between two perfume store employees.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | September 8, 1993
Peace between Israel and the Arabs is the most devastating news for the American weapons industry since perestroika.Compared to Jerusalem and the West Bank, the Golan problem is a piece of cake.Bill figured out how to balance the budget. Keep Congress home every other year.Noureddine Morceli runs the mile like it was all downhill.
NEWS
By Ernest B. Furgurson | December 30, 1990
Washington--.FIVE YEARS later, those who doubted Mikhail Gorbachev's ambitious plans for perestroika could be real are LTC feeling less embarrassed about their skepticism.Most Americans who would be entitled to say ''I told you so'' if Mr. Gorbachev failed are starting 1991 rooting for him. But what's happening in Moscow now raises questions of whether the United States has been wise to base its policy so completely on perestroika's success.Mr. Gorbachev is besieged. Foreign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze's resignation 10 days ago deprived him of his closest ally.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | May 17, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Mikhail Gorbachev should feel distinctly unflattered."I cannot even imagine it," said Masha Kalinina, 19, as she waited backstage before an appearance yesterday on the Los Angeles television show "AM LA." "He is as old as my father. It is not ## possible."Kalinina, a tall, dark-eyed young woman who became the first Soviet beauty queen in 1988, has been accused in a Soviet tabloid of an ongoing affair with the 60-year-old Soviet president. The "Mish-Mash Affair," it was called after Gorby's nickname, Misha.
NEWS
March 16, 1993
A few years ago, Mikhail S. Gorbachev's effort to revitalize the Soviet Union came to naught because so few could agree on the meaning of perestroika.Many people around Mr. Gorbachev understood the term as a mandate to modernize communism and give it a human face. But a sizable portion of the party bureaucracy disagreed, wanting perestroika [restructuring] to be a policy that would make the Soviet empire work again through Marxist-Leninist purism and harsh discipline.In the end, neither of those camps triumphed, of course.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | March 9, 1992
Louisville, Kentucky -- Here's a community, in the midst of a biting national recession, that thinks it's fixed some of its bad old habits and found a way to keep its head above water -- maybe even grow some.Reversing a dramatic loss in manufacturing jobs in the early '80s, the Louisville market area in the last five years has been gaining an average of 10,000 jobs a year. Residents' real earnings have grown 9 percent in the last three years.In the mid-'70s there was public uproar over school busing; in the early '80s, Louisville got dubbed ''Strike City'' for its contentious labor relations.
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