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By Anne Farrow and Anne Farrow,HARTFORD COURANT | October 28, 2006
What looks good in snow? Many perennials have what gardeners identify as "winter interest," because their stems turn a lovely color or the seed head dries on the stem and stays. Some plants need to be cut back so that future growth is protected, but these "winter interest" candidates are not harmed by carrying that interesting dried pod or leaf into cold weather. "Grasses!" says Dawn Pettinelli when asked for recommendations. Among favorites mentioned by the extension educator at the University of Connecticut Home & Garden Education Center are varieties of Miscanthus sinensis, especially "Flame grass," which has pinkish plumes and reddish stems.
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NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2014
As Nathan Reid wandered around his Canton neighborhood, he saw threats everywhere. Empty tree wells, weedy window boxes and flowers that bloomed and died before the end of summer - unkind conditions for the fuzzy, buzzing set. "I want homeowners to become more conscientious gardeners," he told a room full of his neighbors Sunday afternoon. "Honeybees depend on it. " The honeybee enthusiast - or honeybee steward, as he prefers to be called - gathered about 30 people in the basement of a church to emphasize the need to save the insects, which not only produce honey, but also pollinate plants and help in the growing of close to a third of the world's crops.
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NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 4, 2001
Q. We are planning to remove some lawn area and plant a bed of shrubs and perennials. How should we prepare the area for planting? A. In spring, the lawn area can be treated with a herbicide like Roundup and then tilled under after it has died in one to two weeks. Or, you can remove, or strip, the lawn. Whether you strip the lawn by hand or machine, you should take about 1 inch of soil and roots along with the top of the grass. I prefer to prepare beds in late fall; however, herbicides are less effective at this time and it is often necessary to strip the sod. After the lawn is killed or removed, the soil should be amended with organic matter and then tilled.
NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2013
The performing arts scene is revved up for another holiday season. In addition to the usual flurry of such perennial favorites as Handel's "Messiah" and Tchaikovsky's "The Nutcracker," this year's lineup gains fresh spice from several new-to-Baltimore productions, including a play about the last Christmas of the Civil War and stage adaptations of popular holiday movies. Here's a look at some of these novel attractions. 'A Civil War Christmas' In 1997, just before the premiere of "How I Learned to Drive," the powerful play about child abuse that would earn her a Pulitzer Prize, Paula Vogel got the inspiration for a very different work.
NEWS
January 17, 1999
Q. I recently noticed that some of the new perennials I planted in September were lying on their sides with the roots exposed. I replanted them as soon as I saw what happened. Will they survive?A. Your plants were heaved out of the ground by the freezing and thawing action of the soil they were planted in. The plants may be dead if the roots dried out. Pull some extra soil up around the crowns and gently push down on the soil around the plants to anchor them more firmly. Then cover the ground with a 3-inch layer of leaves or straw.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | October 10, 2004
My youngest child has left for college and friends keep asking how things are in the empty nest, and I tell them that my garden is getting better every day. My flowerbeds had been on their own this summer. There had been the illness and death of my children's grandmother, and their departures for college had turned my house for weeks into what looked like the staging area for a military campaign. I vaguely remember sprinkling some coffee grounds around the roses in early June, but nothing after that.
NEWS
August 20, 2000
Q. Is it OK to divide perennials now? My perennial borders grew like gangbusters this summer with all the rain we had. I'll be away from home in the fall and won't get a chance to tend my garden until next spring. A. Fall and spring are the best times to divide and replant, but if you are careful you can be successful at this time. Cut back plant foliage before digging and dividing plants and be sure to keep the root system of each division moist through the late summer and fall. Q. I have six peach trees that are 4 years old and starting to bear fruit this summer.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | September 29, 2002
Q. Should we continue to water perennials through the fall to help them survive the drought? Or does watering not matter as much when plants are beginning to go dormant? A. Most of your plants will surely benefit from some early fall watering. While it is true that most plants slow their growth during periods of extended heat and drought, most perennials will not enter winter dormancy until late fall. I would definitely discontinue watering at that time. Between now and then, you will have to balance the needs or your perennials with both your desire to conserve water and the requirements of the state water restrictions.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 17, 1993
Awell-designed perennial garden is a work of art, and people spend a lot of time racing around England to see the world's best -- at Hampton Court, Sissinghurst and Hidcote Manor, to name just three great ones.But you can have one, too. Yours will be a lot smaller and much simpler, but the variety and beauty can be wonderful.Most perennials demand sunshine; a few of the best ones -- Lenten roses, hostas and hardy ferns -- perform well in the shade.The location must be well-drained to suit most perennials.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and By Nancy Taylor Robson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 31, 2004
While annuals look the same -- only more so -- as they progress through summer, perennials change over the course of a seasonal life. This is one big reason to plant them in the first place. "It's the changes -- from the first folding out of the leaves to the blooms, then the seed heads and the last fall color -- that make them exciting," says Paul Babikow, owner of Babikow Greenhouses, a wholesale grower in Rosedale. Yet not all stages of growth are attractive on all perennials. Some start out as ugly ducklings.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
The purple band on Kyle Schmitt's wrist shows just how much the new Archbishop Spalding football coach respects the Cavaliers' past as he shapes their future. Schmitt, who left a strong Atholton program to take over the rising Cavaliers, has made a lot of changes on the field since Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association football practice began Aug. 5. Off the field, he's letting the players take the lead. He wants them to be as comfortable as possible with the transition from interim coach Brian Propst, who successfully carried on the program after Mike Whittles lost his 16-month battle with pancreatic cancer last summer.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2012
Torrey Smith was convinced that Anquan Boldin was still in the building. He didn't see him in the Ravens' locker room, but he heard his voice, first coming from the equipment area and then from the training room. But as Smith pulled on his uniform and prepared for a recent practice, Boldin's voice became more distant. So Smith did what he has become known for in his two seasons in the NFL: he broke into a full sprint. The wide receiver ran down the hallway outside the locker room, pushed open a back door at the Under Armour Performance Facility and glided down the sidelines of the practice field as if a cornerback was chasing him. "I can't let Anquan beat me out to practice," Smith explained a couple of days later.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | April 25, 2012
As far as downloadable content goes, "Fifa 12's" add-on “UEFA Euro 2012” leaves plenty to be desired. Released yesterday, the expansion to the hit game suffers from a lack of officially licensed teams, lackluster presentation and no support for online play. At $22.50 worth of Microsoft Points, frankly it's a rip-off.  Still, it represents a model that has better potential for customer satisfaction than the current method EA and 2K use to release their sports games. Logically, in the year 2012, the annually released sports franchise should not exist.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2012
Timothy S. Reuwer, an artist who was the co-owner of the Happy Hollow plant nursery, died of cancer Friday at St. Joseph Medical Center. The Cockeysville resident was 59. Born in Baltimore and raised in Hunt Valley, he attended the Boys' Latin School and Baltimore County public schools. Nearly 30 years ago, he and Sue Bloodgood, who would become his wife, founded Happy Hollow Nursery in Cockeysville. They cultivated and sold numerous varieties of day lilies and hostas, among other perennials.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2011
Wolfgang Oehme, a renowned landscape architect and a founder of the New American Garden movement, which incorporated windblown ornamental grasses and massed perennial plantings, died of cancer Thursday at his Towson home. He was 81. "He was a consummate landscape architect," said his business partner, Carol Oppenheimer of Pikesville. "He was a plant genius whose intellect is recognized all over the world. " In the 1970s, he became known as the "Grass Pope" because of the plants he introduced in this country.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2011
The dramatic turnaround for the Towson University football team this season will be punctuated by the school's first playoff appearance since becoming a I-AA program in 1987. While many not familiar with the program's history look at it as if the Tigers have come from nowhere, those who were part of the their early days as a small-college Eastern power wonder if the current success can be sustained. When Towson (9-2) hosts Lehigh (10-1) in the second round of the NCAA Football Championship Subdivision playoffs Saturday at Johnny Unitas Stadium, it will bring back faded snapshots for those who remember when the Tigers were a perennial playoff team.
FEATURES
By Nancy Brachey and Nancy Brachey,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 1997
She has the irises color-coded with bread-bag twists. She has the day lilies grouped by color. She has a map with the locations of daffodils and crocuses, wildflowers and daisies.Come the heat of July or the cold of January, Becky Weaner will be ready to move her garden to her new home.And move it she will.Weaner has been developing her garden of trees, shrubs, wildflowers, perennials and bulbs since she moved into her rented house 20 years ago.She has collected, bought and been given plants for years.
NEWS
By Megan Sexton and Megan Sexton,Knight Ridder / Tribune | October 12, 2003
It's always near the top of any list of fall gardening chores: divide perennials. Why? Large clumping plants -- Such as cannas, black-eyed Susans and day lilies -- end up competing with one another and other things in the garden, meaning fewer blooms. Plus, when there's more room between plants, there's better air flow -- and less chance for disease to spread. An added benefit? Dividing perennials gives you more plants to share with friends and neighbors. Why in the fall? Because plants tend to transplant better when the weather is cool.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2011
Standing alone at a podium in the sixth-floor conference room at Camden Yards on Tuesday morning, new Orioles executive vice president Dan Duquette proclaimed why he is the right man for such a challenging — some might say perilous — job. "I'm a builder," said Duquette, 53, who helped turn around the Montreal Expos and Boston Red Sox franchises but hasn't been in major league baseball since being fired by the Red Sox in 2002. "This is right up my alley, frankly — turning around a ballclub and building a farm and scouting system.
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