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Perennial Candidate

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NEWS
January 8, 1997
Monroe Cornish, who gained attention as a perennial candidate for public office, died Thursday of undisclosed causes at Liberty Medical Center. He was 62 and a resident of Ridgewood Avenue.Mr. Cornish, whose family declined to comment on his death, was a former city police officer, postal worker and teacher with a history of mental problems. He was convicted in 1980 of threatening a U.S. district judge and, in 1989, abducted a federal public defender at gunpoint.Services will be held at noon today at March Funeral Home, 4300 Wabash Ave., Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | September 6, 2007
They're outsiders, and they know it. Just don't call them underdogs. In a crowded field of seven mayoral hopefuls, these five candidates are the ones sending an anti-establishment, down-with-the-status-quo message in criticizing the two frontrunners in the Baltimore mayor's race. None has garnered more than 5 percent support in either of two polls conducted for The Sun this summer, and their campaign coffers are tiny compared with those of the leading candidates, interim Mayor Sheila Dixon and Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. Still, they remain undaunted.
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NEWS
By JENNIFER SKALKA and JENNIFER SKALKA,SUN REPORTER | January 4, 2006
It's going to take more than a crowbar to the skull and a brutal stabbing to stop perennial candidate A. Robert Kaufman from launching a campaign for political office. Kaufman - who survived a violent attack last year by a tenant who refused to pay an overdue security deposit - filed his papers for U.S. Senate yesterday in Annapolis. With a "Vote Socialist" button on his jacket, Kaufman, 74, announced he will run as a Democrat, saying he's willing to swallow his disdain for the two-party political system so that his anti-war, anti-capitalism message might have a better shot at reaching the masses.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | December 8, 2006
A web of misfortune seems only to deepen for Baltimore's best-known Socialist, A. Robert Kaufman. The perennial candidate - who has never won an election - was nearly knifed to death last year by a tenant in his West Baltimore boarding house, and suffered kidney failure as a result of the injuries. Since then, he hasn't been shy about asking just about anyone - even his imprisoned attacker - for a kidney that might turn around his health. And now, like deja vu, he's been attacked again, by another tenant.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2000
An eccentric political gadfly who was evicted two weeks ago from her Annapolis apartment is staying at a local hotel after friends, neighbors, legislators and even the governor stepped in to help her find shelter. Louise Beauregard, a perennial candidate for city and county office and a regular presence at the State House, said she was evicted from her Maryland Avenue apartment after her landlord stopped accepting her Section 8 federal assistance voucher. "The gadfly is not flitting around," Beauregard said of herself.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTER | October 2, 2005
Dr. Ross Z. Pierpont, a general surgeon and a perennial candidate who ran and lost 16 times for offices including Baltimore mayor and U.S. senator, died Friday at his home in Homeland. He was 88. The cause of death was not immediately known, said his daughter, Christine Von Klencke. Her father died shortly after waking up in the morning, she said. Dr. Pierpont was former chief of surgery at Maryland General Hospital and also operated at Harford Memorial Hospital in Havre de Grace. Holding office would have cost him a fortune in lost income from his medical practice and real estate and consulting businesses, he said.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | June 29, 1997
Sylvanus B. Jones doesn't have a storefront campaign office. He doesn't have a campaign committee. He doesn't have the money to finance a race for the highest office in the city of Annapolis against two formidable candidates.His critics call him the "perennial candidate." Some call him the "noncandidate." Some just laugh, never mentioning his name in a growing list of mayoral hopefuls in this election year.So why does Syl Jones, as he likes to be called, believe with all his heart that he will be the next mayor of Annapolis?
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | December 8, 2006
A web of misfortune seems only to deepen for Baltimore's best-known Socialist, A. Robert Kaufman. The perennial candidate - who has never won an election - was nearly knifed to death last year by a tenant in his West Baltimore boarding house, and suffered kidney failure as a result of the injuries. Since then, he hasn't been shy about asking just about anyone - even his imprisoned attacker - for a kidney that might turn around his health. And now, like deja vu, he's been attacked again, by another tenant.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers JoAnna Daemmrich, Michael Dresser and William F. Zorzi Jr. contributed to this article | September 16, 1998
Maryland voters handed Gov. Parris N. Glendening and Republican Ellen R. Sauerbrey landslide victories in yesterday'sgubernatorial primary, clearing the way for a November rematch four years in the making.On a day of low voter turnout, former Gov. William Donald Schaefer won the Democratic nomination in the race for state comptroller, but the Republican race among six candidates was too close to call.Anti-abortion voters, meanwhile, showed their strength in parts of Maryland as the state Senate's two ranking Republicans -- both abortion rights advocates -- were defeated by more conservative challengers.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1999
William E. Roberts, 72, a former insurance salesman and cabdriver, and a perennial candidate, has quietly joined the Baltimore mayor's race.He is among the first candidates to officially file paperwork to run for the office.Roberts filed as a candidate in late December without fanfare. He said he didn't publicize his candidacy because he didn't want to get caught up in the political posturing that he said is diverting attention from the issues."I was trying to be as quiet as possible so I wouldn't be tagged as a perennial candidate, a candidate muddying up the waters," he said.
NEWS
By JENNIFER SKALKA and JENNIFER SKALKA,SUN REPORTER | January 4, 2006
It's going to take more than a crowbar to the skull and a brutal stabbing to stop perennial candidate A. Robert Kaufman from launching a campaign for political office. Kaufman - who survived a violent attack last year by a tenant who refused to pay an overdue security deposit - filed his papers for U.S. Senate yesterday in Annapolis. With a "Vote Socialist" button on his jacket, Kaufman, 74, announced he will run as a Democrat, saying he's willing to swallow his disdain for the two-party political system so that his anti-war, anti-capitalism message might have a better shot at reaching the masses.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTER | October 2, 2005
Dr. Ross Z. Pierpont, a general surgeon and a perennial candidate who ran and lost 16 times for offices including Baltimore mayor and U.S. senator, died Friday at his home in Homeland. He was 88. The cause of death was not immediately known, said his daughter, Christine Von Klencke. Her father died shortly after waking up in the morning, she said. Dr. Pierpont was former chief of surgery at Maryland General Hospital and also operated at Harford Memorial Hospital in Havre de Grace. Holding office would have cost him a fortune in lost income from his medical practice and real estate and consulting businesses, he said.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2000
An eccentric political gadfly who was evicted two weeks ago from her Annapolis apartment is staying at a local hotel after friends, neighbors, legislators and even the governor stepped in to help her find shelter. Louise Beauregard, a perennial candidate for city and county office and a regular presence at the State House, said she was evicted from her Maryland Avenue apartment after her landlord stopped accepting her Section 8 federal assistance voucher. "The gadfly is not flitting around," Beauregard said of herself.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1999
William E. Roberts, 72, a former insurance salesman and cabdriver, and a perennial candidate, has quietly joined the Baltimore mayor's race.He is among the first candidates to officially file paperwork to run for the office.Roberts filed as a candidate in late December without fanfare. He said he didn't publicize his candidacy because he didn't want to get caught up in the political posturing that he said is diverting attention from the issues."I was trying to be as quiet as possible so I wouldn't be tagged as a perennial candidate, a candidate muddying up the waters," he said.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1998
Another leading hopeful in Baltimore's mayoral race announced yesterday that he will not seek the post in the 1999 election, increasing the likelihood that a flurry of other candidates will enter the race.Daniel P. Henson III, the city's housing commissioner, said he has received a steady stream of calls from people urging him to run since Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke announced two weeks ago that he would not seek re-election.Henson described himself as a "mechanic" who goes about helping to fix problems rather than standing in the forefront in a job such as mayor.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers JoAnna Daemmrich, Michael Dresser and William F. Zorzi Jr. contributed to this article | September 16, 1998
Maryland voters handed Gov. Parris N. Glendening and Republican Ellen R. Sauerbrey landslide victories in yesterday'sgubernatorial primary, clearing the way for a November rematch four years in the making.On a day of low voter turnout, former Gov. William Donald Schaefer won the Democratic nomination in the race for state comptroller, but the Republican race among six candidates was too close to call.Anti-abortion voters, meanwhile, showed their strength in parts of Maryland as the state Senate's two ranking Republicans -- both abortion rights advocates -- were defeated by more conservative challengers.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Sun Staff Writer | May 11, 1994
Seven gubernatorial candidates squared off last night on a host of family issues that ranged from welfare reform to spanking school children, but offered few specific remedies.The candidates, Democrats and Republicans, wrestled with the complex issues of government's role in protecting and providing for children and families, and spurring the state economy with the hope of more and better-paying jobs.The two-hour forum at the University of Maryland Baltimore County was sponsored by the MarylandCommittee for Children Inc., a private, nonprofit advocacy group.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1997
Annapolis voters head to the polls today to choose candidates for mayor and alderman in an election that will radically alter the face of the city council.Four incumbents are running for nine slots, and two-term Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins is prohibited from running for re-election by the City Charter.In the mayoral race, Democratic voters will choose among a former mayor, a city council member and a former federal employee. Republicans will choose from two city council members and a perennial candidate for their nominee.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1997
Annapolis voters head to the polls today to choose candidates for mayor and alderman in an election that will radically alter the face of the city council.Four incumbents are running for nine slots, and two-term Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins is prohibited from running for re-election by the City Charter.In the mayoral race, Democratic voters will choose among a former mayor, a city council member and a former federal employee. Republicans will choose from two city council members and a perennial candidate for their nominee.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1997
Who's in, who's out?Those aren't such easy questions when it comes to the Annapolis city elections -- not when four aldermanic candidates have been disqualified, one has bowed out and two new ones have jumped in all within a month.And it isn't just the aldermanic candidates who are livening things up in tomorrow's primary voting. Give credit, too, to the three city council members, a former mayor, a former federal employee and a perennial candidate who are running for mayor."I've been in Annapolis for a quarter of a century now, and I'd have to say this is the most interesting local election we've had in years," said former Mayor Dennis M. Callahan, who is running again after two unsuccessful attempts to retake the office.
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