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BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | March 23, 1993
NEW YORK -- Investor Ronald O. Perelman, through his MacAndrews & Forbes Holdings Inc. holding company, plans to boost his stake in Marvel Entertainment Group Inc. through a $25-a-share cash tender offer for up to 11 million common shares.Mr. Perelman, who originally sold 30 percent of the company in an initial public offering in 1991, plans to purchase the additional 20 percent-stake through his New Marvel Holdings Inc. subsidiary. The unit currently owns about 60 percent of Marvel.James T. Conroy, special counsel for MacAndrews and Forbes, declined to comment on why Mr. Perelman was acquiring the additional stake except to say that "Marvel is an excellent investment."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 24, 2006
What would cause someone to take a pass on fame, honors, a lot of money and everything he worked toward in life? After years of work, Grigory Perelman of St. Petersburg, Russia, solved one of mathematics' most tantalizing challenges - the century-old Poincare conjecture - and at the age of 40 he has apparently decided that that was enough. At the 25th International Congress of Mathematicians, meeting in Madrid, Spain, he was announced as one of the winners of the Fields Medal, considered as great an honor in its field as the Nobel.
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BUSINESS
By Susan Harrigan and Susan Harrigan,NEWSDAY | May 17, 2005
Billionaire financier Ronald O. Perelman stands to become even richer after a jury verdict yesterday in his fraud case against Morgan Stanley, the nation's second-largest securities firm. A jury in a Florida state court awarded $604.3 million in compensatory damages to Perelman, chairman of Manhattan-based Revlon Inc., whose net worth was estimated at $4.9 billion by Forbes magazine in a recent report on the world's wealthiest people. Perelman accused Morgan Stanley of defrauding him for the sake of earning investment banking fees when it advised him to sell his 82 percent stake in camping-gear maker Coleman Co. Inc. to Sunbeam Corp.
BUSINESS
By Susan Harrigan and Susan Harrigan,NEWSDAY | May 17, 2005
Billionaire financier Ronald O. Perelman stands to become even richer after a jury verdict yesterday in his fraud case against Morgan Stanley, the nation's second-largest securities firm. A jury in a Florida state court awarded $604.3 million in compensatory damages to Perelman, chairman of Manhattan-based Revlon Inc., whose net worth was estimated at $4.9 billion by Forbes magazine in a recent report on the world's wealthiest people. Perelman accused Morgan Stanley of defrauding him for the sake of earning investment banking fees when it advised him to sell his 82 percent stake in camping-gear maker Coleman Co. Inc. to Sunbeam Corp.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 22, 1998
PHILADELPHIA - Nearly 30 years after its last major construction project added dormitories, the student bookstore and a new research center, the University of Pennsylvania is in the midst of two major building and renovation projects that will again reshape its campus.One of them, called Sansom Common, will include in its first phase a 250-room hotel, shops and a new bookstore at an estimated cost of $73 million. The site is at the heart of the campus on a block bounded by Walnut, Sansom, 36th and 37th streets that for years has been a 2-acre parking lot.The second phase will include the creation of a new north-south street linking the hotel entrance to Chestnut Street, a major artery leading to downtown Philadelphia.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 19, 2004
MOSCOW - In his office overlooking the faded pastel mansions along a St. Petersburg canal, a young Russian mathematician spent eight solitary years grappling with the Poincare Conjecture, one of the most famous and frustrating conundrums in math. Now, colleagues say, Grigori Y. Perelman may not only have solved the century-old riddle. He may have helped advance many areas of math and physics, and made it possible to better understand the shape of the universe. "It seems like a very beautiful idea," one American colleague said.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2005
In the Region McCain threatens Lockheed subpoena over C-130 expenses Sen. John McCain said yesterday that he might seek to subpoena Lockheed Martin Corp. documents if the company doesn't provide paperwork that details cost increases since 1995 on the C-130J transport aircraft. The transport, one of Lockheed's top three military aircraft programs, has increased in price to $67 million per plane last year from $33 million each in 1995, when the Air Force started buying the aircraft. "We may have to ask the committee to subpoena Lockheed Martin," the Arizona Republican said at a hearing by the Senate Armed Services subcommittee, of which he is chairman.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 29, 1997
NEW YORK -- Marvel Entertainment Group Inc. Chairman Ronald Perelman yesterday unveiled a second proposal to get the comic-book company out of bankruptcy court, drawing criticism from bondholders who succeeded in blocking the first plan.Under the proposal, Marvel would combine its comic book and character-licensing businesses with Toy Biz Inc., which makes toys modeled on Marvel characters. Marvel then would auction the combined company, mainly to repay secured creditors.Bondholders said the plan is Perelman's latest effort to hamper their recovery on $894 million of bonds.
NEWS
August 24, 2006
What would cause someone to take a pass on fame, honors, a lot of money and everything he worked toward in life? After years of work, Grigory Perelman of St. Petersburg, Russia, solved one of mathematics' most tantalizing challenges - the century-old Poincare conjecture - and at the age of 40 he has apparently decided that that was enough. At the 25th International Congress of Mathematicians, meeting in Madrid, Spain, he was announced as one of the winners of the Fields Medal, considered as great an honor in its field as the Nobel.
NEWS
January 13, 2004
IN THE WORLD of topology, the science of surfaces, the difference between a doughnut and an apple can be explained with a rubber band. The rubber band can be removed from an apple without breaking; that's not the case if it is wrapped in, around and through a doughnut. That's why the surface of an apple is "simply connected" and the doughnut's is not. Are you with us? About 100 years ago, the French mathematician Jules Henri PoincarM-i wondered if this same property of connectivity pertained to the geometry of a three-dimensional space, such as the north-south-east-west-up-down area through which an airplane flies.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2005
In the Region McCain threatens Lockheed subpoena over C-130 expenses Sen. John McCain said yesterday that he might seek to subpoena Lockheed Martin Corp. documents if the company doesn't provide paperwork that details cost increases since 1995 on the C-130J transport aircraft. The transport, one of Lockheed's top three military aircraft programs, has increased in price to $67 million per plane last year from $33 million each in 1995, when the Air Force started buying the aircraft. "We may have to ask the committee to subpoena Lockheed Martin," the Arizona Republican said at a hearing by the Senate Armed Services subcommittee, of which he is chairman.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 19, 2004
MOSCOW - In his office overlooking the faded pastel mansions along a St. Petersburg canal, a young Russian mathematician spent eight solitary years grappling with the Poincare Conjecture, one of the most famous and frustrating conundrums in math. Now, colleagues say, Grigori Y. Perelman may not only have solved the century-old riddle. He may have helped advance many areas of math and physics, and made it possible to better understand the shape of the universe. "It seems like a very beautiful idea," one American colleague said.
NEWS
January 13, 2004
IN THE WORLD of topology, the science of surfaces, the difference between a doughnut and an apple can be explained with a rubber band. The rubber band can be removed from an apple without breaking; that's not the case if it is wrapped in, around and through a doughnut. That's why the surface of an apple is "simply connected" and the doughnut's is not. Are you with us? About 100 years ago, the French mathematician Jules Henri PoincarM-i wondered if this same property of connectivity pertained to the geometry of a three-dimensional space, such as the north-south-east-west-up-down area through which an airplane flies.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 22, 1998
PHILADELPHIA - Nearly 30 years after its last major construction project added dormitories, the student bookstore and a new research center, the University of Pennsylvania is in the midst of two major building and renovation projects that will again reshape its campus.One of them, called Sansom Common, will include in its first phase a 250-room hotel, shops and a new bookstore at an estimated cost of $73 million. The site is at the heart of the campus on a block bounded by Walnut, Sansom, 36th and 37th streets that for years has been a 2-acre parking lot.The second phase will include the creation of a new north-south street linking the hotel entrance to Chestnut Street, a major artery leading to downtown Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 29, 1997
NEW YORK -- Marvel Entertainment Group Inc. Chairman Ronald Perelman yesterday unveiled a second proposal to get the comic-book company out of bankruptcy court, drawing criticism from bondholders who succeeded in blocking the first plan.Under the proposal, Marvel would combine its comic book and character-licensing businesses with Toy Biz Inc., which makes toys modeled on Marvel characters. Marvel then would auction the combined company, mainly to repay secured creditors.Bondholders said the plan is Perelman's latest effort to hamper their recovery on $894 million of bonds.
FEATURES
By Douglas Martin and Douglas Martin,New York Times News Service | August 21, 1994
In the beginning, there were five troubled teen-agers -- Cyclops, Angel, Beast, Iceman and Marvel Girl -- all normal until they turned 13. Suddenly they could do superhuman things -- fly, shoot energy from their eyes and much, much more.Called the X-Men, "the strangest superheroes of all," they promptly went to war against Magneto, the master of magnetism and a real bad guy.It was a rebellious style, only slightly masked by the jackets and ++ ties the X-Men then wore. An early issue has Iceman, whose frigid rays cool any situation, exclaiming: "Here's a quick-freezing icy sweatshirt for you, Stretch!
FEATURES
By Douglas Martin and Douglas Martin,New York Times News Service | August 21, 1994
In the beginning, there were five troubled teen-agers -- Cyclops, Angel, Beast, Iceman and Marvel Girl -- all normal until they turned 13. Suddenly they could do superhuman things -- fly, shoot energy from their eyes and much, much more.Called the X-Men, "the strangest superheroes of all," they promptly went to war against Magneto, the master of magnetism and a real bad guy.It was a rebellious style, only slightly masked by the jackets and ++ ties the X-Men then wore. An early issue has Iceman, whose frigid rays cool any situation, exclaiming: "Here's a quick-freezing icy sweatshirt for you, Stretch!
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen | March 17, 1991
The forthcoming sale of Maryland collector Tom Anderson's estate is the most eclectic to come along in some time.Mr. Anderson, a Rockville attorney who died suddenly last September, had the energy, the means and the eye to assemble an extraordinary collection of country furniture, toys, coin-operated machines, pop-up books, Crackerjack prizes, sulphide marbles, Christmas ornaments and Santa Claus figures, trade signs, syrup dispensers, figural lawn sprinklers...
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | March 23, 1993
NEW YORK -- Investor Ronald O. Perelman, through his MacAndrews & Forbes Holdings Inc. holding company, plans to boost his stake in Marvel Entertainment Group Inc. through a $25-a-share cash tender offer for up to 11 million common shares.Mr. Perelman, who originally sold 30 percent of the company in an initial public offering in 1991, plans to purchase the additional 20 percent-stake through his New Marvel Holdings Inc. subsidiary. The unit currently owns about 60 percent of Marvel.James T. Conroy, special counsel for MacAndrews and Forbes, declined to comment on why Mr. Perelman was acquiring the additional stake except to say that "Marvel is an excellent investment."
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen | March 17, 1991
The forthcoming sale of Maryland collector Tom Anderson's estate is the most eclectic to come along in some time.Mr. Anderson, a Rockville attorney who died suddenly last September, had the energy, the means and the eye to assemble an extraordinary collection of country furniture, toys, coin-operated machines, pop-up books, Crackerjack prizes, sulphide marbles, Christmas ornaments and Santa Claus figures, trade signs, syrup dispensers, figural lawn sprinklers...
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