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By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2010
Thirty-three years after an endangered peregrine falcon named Scarlett was released from her breeding facility and raised foster chicks and later her own hatchlings on a 33rd-floor ledge of a Baltimore skyscraper, the bird's heirs are still bringing more peregrines into the world. The latest young falcon, or eyas, hatched earlier this spring and is expected to test her wings next month. She is the youngest in a nearly unbroken succession of close to 100 young peregrines to fledge from the same aerie on the former USF&G and later Legg Mason tower, at 100 Light St. Craig Koppie, a raptor biologist with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, is keeping watch over the family.
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By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2010
Thirty-three years after an endangered peregrine falcon named Scarlett was released from her breeding facility and raised foster chicks and later her own hatchlings on a 33rd-floor ledge of a Baltimore skyscraper, the bird's heirs are still bringing more peregrines into the world. The latest young falcon, or eyas, hatched earlier this spring and is expected to test her wings next month. She is the youngest in a nearly unbroken succession of close to 100 young peregrines to fledge from the same aerie on the former USF&G and later Legg Mason tower, at 100 Light St. Craig Koppie, a raptor biologist with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, is keeping watch over the family.
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NEWS
January 6, 1991
Since its creation in 1980, the North Harford Middle School's literary magazine "Ink Blot" -- now called "Peregrine" -- has had a winningtradition.And now North Harford High's "Peregrine" and the school's newspaper, "Falcon's Eye," have received Medalist/First Place honors from the Columbia Scholastic Press Association.The 1990 edition of "Peregrine" earned 955 out of a possible 1,000 points.Three All-Columbian awards also were given for superior achievement in content, design and creativity.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2004
They live in a ritzy high-rise with a sweeping view of the Inner Harbor and regularly dine on the city's choice fowl. But for one young peregrine falcon roosting on the 33rd floor of the Legg Mason building, this avian dream came to a halt yesterday morning. Craig Koppie, a biologist at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Chesapeake Bay field office, arrived for his annual visit to the 26-year-old peregrine roost to band three chicks, or eyases, hatched late last month in a gravel-filled box that serves as their nest.
NEWS
By Sascha Segan and Sascha Segan,Contributing Writer | June 9, 1994
Peregrine falcons Felicity and Beauregard are taking care of two new hatchlings on a 33rd-floor ledge of the USF&G building in Baltimore.The 52nd and 53rd eyases born at the USF&G site are a week old. Two other eggs did not hatch.This is the third successful mating season for Felicity and Beauregard, whose offspring have been have been identified as far away as Dayton, Ohio, said John Barber, a USF&G employee and former Smithsonian ornithologist.Endangered 20 years ago, peregrines are returning to thriving numbers.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 27, 1996
STANFORDVILLE, N.Y. -- No one doubts that Dona Tracy loves birds. It is just that some people believe she loves them too well.In the rolling fields behind her farmhouse here in Dutchess County, Tracy has built a wildlife sanctuary with vast aviaries and cages, as big as those at any zoo, where she treats and rehabilitates injured raptors.Though she has no formal veterinary training, Tracy, 49, with the help of 52 volunteers, runs the largest raptor sanctuary in the state, where 120 owls, hawks, falcons, vultures and other wild and endangered birds dwell on 91 acres.
FEATURES
By Judith Dunford and Judith Dunford,Newsday | February 7, 1995
Anyone who publishes anything had better be prepared to have it ranked against previous work, his own included. Still, Robert James Waller is an extreme case.In 1992, he loosed upon the world "The Bridges of MadisonCounty," the love story of an itinerant outdoor photographer and an Iowa farm wife. Slim, a mere 171 small-format pages, it was as unlikely a hit as its spiritual predecessor, "Jonathan Livingston Seagull." To the discerning eye, the writing seemed, even at its best, no more than neighborhood workshop level, and the plot a heavy-breathing refugee from Harlequin.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Staff Writer | June 25, 1992
Three 10-day-old peregrine falcons made their media debut yesterday from the 33rd-floor ledge of the United States Fidelity & Guaranty building.Covered with snow-white down, they huddled in a corner of their nest box and dozed. The male, snuggled between the two larger females, raised his head briefly.Felicity, their mother, sensed the camera crews and others inside behind the one-way window and screamed a succession of sharp, hoarse distress calls.Peregrines, still endangered in the United States because of past poisoning by the now-banned pesticide DDT, have been raising young above the Inner Harbor since 1979.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Staff Writer | April 1, 1992
A pair of endangered peregrine falcons appears to be trying to nest on a tall building in Ocean City. By itself, that would be more good news for the species once wiped out in the East by the pesticide DDT.However, the birds have posed a difficult question for state wildlife managers: What if the falcons, which are not native to the Eastern Shore, start preying on declining numbers of native terns and other species state biologists are trying to protect?Eirik...
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Staff Writer | May 14, 1993
A great drama of nature is taking place again, high above Baltimore's Inner Harbor -- the revival of a bird of prey nearly wiped out just three decades ago by the pesticide DDT.Baltimore's peregrine falcons, Beauregard and Felicity, hatched four robust chicks, known as eyases, this week on their 33rd-floor "cliff" at the USF&G Building.Hatchings have become an annual occurrence at the falcon "scrape," or nest, but it is the commonplace nature of the event that is so impressive. This year's clutch of eggs brings to 51 the number of peregrine young produced there -- accounting for more than any other known nesting site for the comeback of the species east of the Mississippi.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 24, 2002
SAN DIEGO - Peregrine Systems Inc. said yesterday that it will erase about $100 million in sales for most of the past three years, and that the Securities and Exchange Commission has started a formal investigation of the business-software maker's financial practices. Peregrine, whose software lets businesses track assets such as computers and vehicles, will restate results for most of the past three years. The company said it might cut jobs and seek "financing alternatives." Company officials couldn't be reached for comment.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2001
HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. - Three peregrine falcons completed their journey yesterday from the Chesapeake Bay to a perch overlooking this historic town - without flying an inch. Too young to take flight, the baby birds instead were plucked from their nest near Hart-Miller Island and ferried to a rocky cliff that was last patrolled by their ancestors half a century ago. Park rangers and federal and state naturalists hope the rare falcons take to their new home - and establish what would be the only known mountain nesting site for Maryland's peregrines.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1998
The peregrine falcon will be removed from the endangered species list, according to a proposal to be announced today by Bruce Babbitt, secretary of the Department of the Interior."
NEWS
By Daniel Diamond and Daniel Diamond,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | June 11, 1998
Baltimore's oldest peregrine falcon has a new brood of chicks in his nest high atop the downtown skyline, and some new jewelry on his leg -- thanks to a lucky grab.Beauregard -- in residence on the former USF&G Building since 1983 -- and his mate of two springs, Artemis, hatched one male and three female chicks, or eyases, at the beginning of May.Their official caretaker, John Barber, said each of the eyases was given an identification band on May 20. And remarkably, after so many years of ruling over the 33rd-floor ledge without being caught, so was Beau.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 27, 1996
STANFORDVILLE, N.Y. -- No one doubts that Dona Tracy loves birds. It is just that some people believe she loves them too well.In the rolling fields behind her farmhouse here in Dutchess County, Tracy has built a wildlife sanctuary with vast aviaries and cages, as big as those at any zoo, where she treats and rehabilitates injured raptors.Though she has no formal veterinary training, Tracy, 49, with the help of 52 volunteers, runs the largest raptor sanctuary in the state, where 120 owls, hawks, falcons, vultures and other wild and endangered birds dwell on 91 acres.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1996
A family of peregrine falcons was reunited yesterday when a fledgling bird that had fallen into the Chesapeake Bay a week ago and was cared for at the Baltimore Zoo was returned to her nest on the Bay Bridge.One lane of bridge traffic was closed for 15 minutes yesterday morning while the bird was returned to the nest below the roadway in the center of the westbound span of the bridge.The bird, a 49-day-old female, was one of two young falcons born to the nesting pair at the bridge this year.
NEWS
By Daniel Diamond and Daniel Diamond,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | June 11, 1998
Baltimore's oldest peregrine falcon has a new brood of chicks in his nest high atop the downtown skyline, and some new jewelry on his leg -- thanks to a lucky grab.Beauregard -- in residence on the former USF&G Building since 1983 -- and his mate of two springs, Artemis, hatched one male and three female chicks, or eyases, at the beginning of May.Their official caretaker, John Barber, said each of the eyases was given an identification band on May 20. And remarkably, after so many years of ruling over the 33rd-floor ledge without being caught, so was Beau.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Staff Writer | April 1, 1992
The caption for a photo of a peregrine falcon published yesterday should have said that the picture was taken near Chincoteague, Va., by a staff member of the Daily Press of Newport News, Va.The Sun regrets the error.A pair of endangered peregrine falcons appears to be trying to nest on a tall building in Ocean City. By itself, that would be more good news for the species once wiped out in the East by the pesticide DDT.However, the birds have posed a difficult question for state wildlife managers: What if the falcons, which are not native to the Eastern Shore, start preying on declining numbers of native terns and other species state biologists are trying to protect?
FEATURES
By Judith Dunford and Judith Dunford,Newsday | February 7, 1995
Anyone who publishes anything had better be prepared to have it ranked against previous work, his own included. Still, Robert James Waller is an extreme case.In 1992, he loosed upon the world "The Bridges of MadisonCounty," the love story of an itinerant outdoor photographer and an Iowa farm wife. Slim, a mere 171 small-format pages, it was as unlikely a hit as its spiritual predecessor, "Jonathan Livingston Seagull." To the discerning eye, the writing seemed, even at its best, no more than neighborhood workshop level, and the plot a heavy-breathing refugee from Harlequin.
NEWS
By Sascha Segan and Sascha Segan,Sun Staff Writer | June 10, 1994
At first, all you see is a fuzz ball. It's bigger than a tennis ball, slightly smaller than a softball, and quivering.Then one little beaked head pokes up, surveys the glorious view of the Inner Harbor and decides it's not all that interesting. The bird that makes up the other half of the fuzzball ruffles its wings, and the two siblings snuggle back together.The pair of week-old peregrine falcons, in their gravel box on a 33rd floor ledge of the USF&G building in downtown Baltimore, are the 52nd and 53rd chicks to come from the mid-Atlantic's most celebrated nest.
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