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NEWS
September 22, 2014
Last week, Jim Perdue spoke at a Maryland Chamber of Commerce event to complain about the regulatory environment in the state where his company roosts. "The problem is, we have no seat at the table in Maryland," the Perdue Farms chairman said, according to the Baltimore Business Journal. "Even if we have an onerous thing that happens in Virginia or Delaware, we can sit at the table and at least express our opinion. " Wow. Just wow. No doubt there are a lot of corporate CEOs out there who are nodding their heads in agreement at Mr. Perdue's chirping.
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NEWS
September 22, 2014
Last week, Jim Perdue spoke at a Maryland Chamber of Commerce event to complain about the regulatory environment in the state where his company roosts. "The problem is, we have no seat at the table in Maryland," the Perdue Farms chairman said, according to the Baltimore Business Journal. "Even if we have an onerous thing that happens in Virginia or Delaware, we can sit at the table and at least express our opinion. " Wow. Just wow. No doubt there are a lot of corporate CEOs out there who are nodding their heads in agreement at Mr. Perdue's chirping.
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NEWS
By Wenonah Hauter and Robert S. Lawrence | April 5, 2010
S omething's rotten in the state of Maryland, and it's time that a central player in one of the state's biggest industries accepts its fair share of responsibility for the problem. Perdue Farms Inc. is one of the leading poultry integrators operating in the state of Maryland, contracting with hundreds of growers on the Eastern Shore who raise broiler chickens for the company. Perdue controls the production process from start to finish and owns the birds from the hatchery, to the slaughterhouse, to the wholesale distribution and on to the grocery store.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
Salisbury University announced Thursday the receipt of an $8 million donation - tied for the largest in its history - from the Guerrieri Family Foundation. The funds will help develop a new Academic Commons area on the Eastern Shore campus. The $116 million project, which includes a new library and Delmarva research center, will be named after Patricia R. Guerrieri, a Salisbury alumna who studied elementary education in the 1950s. She died in 2010. Her family ran Showell Farms, a poultry processing business with five plants in four states, for decades until Perdue Farms acquired the company in 1995.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
Salisbury University announced Thursday the receipt of an $8 million donation - tied for the largest in its history - from the Guerrieri Family Foundation. The funds will help develop a new Academic Commons area on the Eastern Shore campus. The $116 million project, which includes a new library and Delmarva research center, will be named after Patricia R. Guerrieri, a Salisbury alumna who studied elementary education in the 1950s. She died in 2010. Her family ran Showell Farms, a poultry processing business with five plants in four states, for decades until Perdue Farms acquired the company in 1995.
NEWS
December 18, 2009
A pair of environmental groups said Thursday that they plan to sue Perdue Farms and an Eastern Shore chicken grower for alleged water pollution violations. The Assateague Coastkeeper and the Waterkeeper Alliance filed notice of their intent to seek legal action in 60 days against the Salisbury-based poultry company and the owners of a farm near Berlin that raises 80,000 birds under contract to Perdue. The groups contend that a drainage ditch feeding into the Pocomoke River, a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay, is being polluted with chicken manure washing off the farm.
NEWS
By Richard F. Colburn | November 29, 2011
It is true that there are at least two sides to every story, including the situation of Gov. Martin O'Malley entering into the ongoing case between the University of Maryland Environmental Law Clinic and the Hudson family of Worcester County and Perdue Farms. I have to wonder, has the Environmental Law Clinic only looked at one side of this story? I also have to wonder if the Maryland taxpayer would only look at one side. Since it seems as though only one side of the story is being told, in The Baltimore Sun and elsewhere, let's examine the facts of the other side of the story.
NEWS
January 6, 2012
There is no doubt who actually represents the 1 percent in the case Farrell Keough describes in his recent letter to the editor ("UMD law clinic sues on behalf of the 1 percent," Dec. 30). With more than $4.5 billion in revenue, Perdue Farms is one of the largest chicken and turkey producers in the world, processing and packing more than 3 billion pounds of poultry a year thanks to some 2,200 contracted poultry producers in about 15 states. Despite the benefit of these immense revenues, Perdue claims it bears no responsibility for the waste produced by the chickens it sells; instead, it takes the chickens, makes a profit, and tries to leave the growers with the mess.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | December 23, 2009
A state inspection has determined that the mound on a Berlin chicken farm that environmental groups said was polluting a nearby waterway is treated sewage sludge rather than poultry manure. Maryland Department of the Environment spokesman Jay Apperson e-mailed Tuesday that an inspector found the pile on the Hudson farm was "Class A biosolid," a form of sewage sludge that has been treated to kill harmful bacteria and is only lightly regulated by the state. Jim Parsons, deputy chief of public utilities for Ocean City, said Tuesday that his agency had delivered a load of "biosolids" from Ocean City's wastewater treatment plant to Alan Hudson's farm in August.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler | March 27, 2010
State officials announced Friday that they had fined an Eastern Shore farm couple $4,000 for improperly piling sewage sludge near a drainage ditch. But the Department of the Environment declared it had closed its investigation of the Hudson farm in Berlin with no further action because its inspectors could not say the farm was responsible for pollution found in the ditches draining its land. State inspectors had detected high levels of bacteria and nutrients in the ditches, which ultimately drain into the Pocomoke River.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
Officials in Worcester County are investigating the cause of a fire at a Perdue Farms research facility that destroyed two poultry houses and killed 8,000 chicks. The fire broke out at 3:15 p.m. Wednesday, more than an hour after the four workers on duty to care for the birds had ended their day and left the farm in Pocomoke City, said Julie DeYoung, a Perdue spokeswoman. The fire in the 8-year-old, 22,500-square-foot buildings — two of 15 poultry houses on site — is being investigated by the Worcester County Fire Marshal, DeYoung said.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2012
A dispute that started three years ago when environmentalists accused an Eastern Shore chicken farm and one of the nation's largest poultry companies of polluting a stream that ultimately flows to the Chesapeake Bay comes to a head Tuesday in a Baltimore federal courtroom. The trial, expected to last up to three weeks, begins in the Waterkeeper Alliance's lawsuit against Berlin farmers Alan and Kristin Hudson and Perdue Farms, the Salisbury-based company for whom the Hudsons raised birds.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
With a catch in her throat, Kristin Hudson talks in a video posted online about her young daughter asking if "they" will take away her daddy's farm. The video, featured on SaveFarmFamilies.org rallied farmers and others across the country to the side of an Eastern Shore farm couple fighting an environmental group's lawsuit alleging that the farm polluted a Chesapeake Bay tributary. The Web-based organization has raised more than $200,000 to date from Perdue Farms, agricultural groups and other farmers to help Alan and Kristin Hudson pay legal bills in the 2-year-old case, according to one of the group's leaders.
NEWS
January 6, 2012
There is no doubt who actually represents the 1 percent in the case Farrell Keough describes in his recent letter to the editor ("UMD law clinic sues on behalf of the 1 percent," Dec. 30). With more than $4.5 billion in revenue, Perdue Farms is one of the largest chicken and turkey producers in the world, processing and packing more than 3 billion pounds of poultry a year thanks to some 2,200 contracted poultry producers in about 15 states. Despite the benefit of these immense revenues, Perdue claims it bears no responsibility for the waste produced by the chickens it sells; instead, it takes the chickens, makes a profit, and tries to leave the growers with the mess.
NEWS
By Richard F. Colburn | November 29, 2011
It is true that there are at least two sides to every story, including the situation of Gov. Martin O'Malley entering into the ongoing case between the University of Maryland Environmental Law Clinic and the Hudson family of Worcester County and Perdue Farms. I have to wonder, has the Environmental Law Clinic only looked at one side of this story? I also have to wonder if the Maryland taxpayer would only look at one side. Since it seems as though only one side of the story is being told, in The Baltimore Sun and elsewhere, let's examine the facts of the other side of the story.
NEWS
December 16, 2010
At six weeks of age, the average chicken produces about 5 ounces of waste each day. That may not seem like much, but multiply it by 80,000, which is how many birds may be found in a single commercial chicken house, and it's ankle-deep in short order. For most farmers this has been regarded as a prized asset, not a problem. Poultry litter is periodically spread on fields to fertilize crops and spare farmers the expense of buying expensive commercial fertilizers. It's the proverbial cycle of life.
NEWS
September 20, 2010
Imagine that you live near an industry that you suspect pollutes a river, a bunch of sewage treatment plants perhaps. You ask state government for records of how the plants have been regulated and what standards they must meet. Although the agency is required to provide those public documents, officials hem and haw and, unbeknownst to you, reach out to a trade group that then files a legal challenge to stop the release of information. A local judge agrees to issue a temporary restraining order.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2010
A federal judge has denied a bid by Perdue Farms and an Eastern Shore chicken grower to dismiss a lawsuit accusing them of polluting a Chesapeake Bay tributary, clearing the way for trial on the potentially pioneering legal case. Judge William M. Nickerson of the U.S. District Court in Baltimore ruled Tuesday that the lawsuit brought this year by the Waterkeeper Alliance could go forward, though he struck two environmental groups as plaintiffs on a technicality. The Waterkeeper Alliance, the Assateague Coastal Trust and Assateague Coastkeeper Kathy Phillips filed suit in March alleging that harmful levels of bacteria and nutrient pollution were flowing from a drainage ditch on a Worcester County farm into a branch of the Pocomoke River.
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