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NEWS
November 23, 2010
Behind Perdue's "home sweet home" facade is a vast, multinational corporation that for decades has kept the Chesapeake Bay on life support ("Perdue woos consumers with home, sweet home," Nov. 22). Perdue is an industrial-scale polluter of our cherished waterways. Governments should therefore impose industrial-scale clean-up requirements on Perdue and similar companies. Perdue owns many of the 568 million chickens raised every year on the Delmarva Peninsula. These half-billion birds generate 1.1 billion pounds of manure every year, which contributes to the annual dead zones in the Chesapeake Bay. Unfortunately, Perdue is not alone.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 22, 2014
Last week, Jim Perdue spoke at a Maryland Chamber of Commerce event to complain about the regulatory environment in the state where his company roosts. "The problem is, we have no seat at the table in Maryland," the Perdue Farms chairman said, according to the Baltimore Business Journal. "Even if we have an onerous thing that happens in Virginia or Delaware, we can sit at the table and at least express our opinion. " Wow. Just wow. No doubt there are a lot of corporate CEOs out there who are nodding their heads in agreement at Mr. Perdue's chirping.
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NEWS
January 6, 2006
On January 4, 2006, JACK, beloved husband of Betty Perdue (nee Loftis), devoted father of Jack L. Perdue and his wife Denise, Mark Perdue and his wife Mary; dear brother of Bob Perdue, loving grandfather of David, Chuck, Mellisa, Logan and Emma. Friends may call at the CONNELLY FUNERAL HOME OF DUNDALK, P.A., 7110 Sollers Point Road, on Friday, 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral Services will be held on Saturday, 9:30 A.M. Interment Oak Lawn Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to Community Hospice of Maryland, 9940 Franklin Square Drive, Baltimore, MD 21236.
NEWS
June 19, 2014
Regarding the recent article, "Phosphorus reduction in bay losing steam in places " (June 15), it is important to note that legislation addressing the issues exposed has already been drafted. Farmers are often attacked for problems that stem beyond their control. The corporations that create (and monopolize) the massive poultry industry in Maryland must be held accountable for the pollution of our Chesapeake Bay. These large companies not only own the birds raised at many of the farms in question but they also leave the responsibility of the waste to their own contract farmers.
NEWS
April 8, 2010
The public deserves clean, safe water. Clean water in our food and drinks, clean water in our streams, and clean water in the Chesapeake Bay. Perdue contributes significantly to water pollution in Maryland, and therefore Perdue should pay its fair share to help restore our waterways and the bay ("Perdue: Chicken waste handled in environmentally responsible manner", April 6). The key problem with manure is that there's too much of it. According to a recent analysis by Water Stewardship Inc., the poultry industry in Maryland generates 300,000 tons of surplus manure with 4,000 more tons of phosphorus than needed to grow all the crops in the major poultry producing counties.
NEWS
March 3, 1992
For animal rights activists, throwing a pie at a business leader while he is serving the state in a voluntary capacity is a minor piece of mischief, calculated to make headlines and to cause pTC embarrassment. No doubt Frank Perdue, the target of a pie tossed at a University of Maryland Board of Regents meeting Friday, found the incident messy and inconvenient. For the rest of us, the incident was an example of activists who don't bother to distinguish between silly and serious.We have our problems with the animal rights agenda since we believe the life of a human being carries more inherent value than that of a chicken or a pig or a dog. We also believe that vegetarianism, a cardinal tenet of many animal rights groups, should not be forced on people.
NEWS
November 25, 2011
It is about time that people become aware about how secrets hidden by animal agriculture detrimentally affect us all. Animal waste disposal from farms supplying animals for slaughter to large meat factories such as Perdue is not inspected responsibly. At the same time, when the farming operations of their suppliers is questioned, the big company leaves the small farmers alone to fend for themselves. It is appalling how large agribusinesses protect their operations from being open to the public and are allowed to inspect and regulate themselves.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Broiler Industry magazineSun Staff Writer | November 17, 1994
Perdue Farms Inc., the nation's fourth-largest chicken processor, is engaged in merger talks with Showell Farms Inc., one of its oldest and closest competitors.Officials in both Maryland-based companies yesterday described the talks as preliminary, but insiders and industry analysts said a merger would make sense.And if the companies merge, it may set off a wave of consolidation among poultry processors, some predicted.Perdue Chairman James A. Perdue said in a prepared statement that he has long known the Guerrieri family, which founded and runs Showell Farms near the Perdue operation.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Kim Clark contributed to this article | January 6, 1995
Perdue Farms said yesterday that it has completed the acquisition of Eastern Shore-based competitor Showell Farms, creating the nation's third-largest poultry company, processing more than 11 million chickens each week.The acquisition also provides Perdue a bigger presence in Florida, where Showell has operated for 20 years. Perdue, a 75-year-old company with processing plants in six states, has sold its products there only since January 1994."The acquisition provides a tremendous opportunity for all who work for the two companies," said James A. Perdue, chairman of the Salisbury-based firm.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
The lawsuit may be over, but the bitter legal battle continues. Lawyers for poultry producer Perdue and an Eastern Shore farmer are asking a federal judge to award them more than $3 million in attorneys' fees and expenses from the Waterkeeper Alliance, the New York-based environmental group that failed to prove they were polluting a Chesapeake Bay tributary. Pointing to written comments by the deciding judge that were critical of the plaintiffs' motives and the strength of their case, the successful defendants contend they're justified in seeking reimbursement for a case they argued should never have gotten that far. "It's only fair," said Julie DeYoung, spokeswoman for the Salisbury-based company.
SPORTS
By Jonathan Munshaw, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Dawn Perdue has been following racing for as long as she can remember. When she was 9, Perdue watched a drag race with her father. Immediately after seeing a jet dragster go down the track, she turned to her father and told him her dream was to race in one. Perdue moved closer to that dream on her 16th birthday, when her parents bought her her first racecar, a Ford Pinto. Although she grew up in Pennsylvania near the Maryland border, Perdue's racing career blossomed in Cecil County and at Maryland International Raceway at Budds Creek Motocross Park in Mechanicsville.
NEWS
February 23, 2014
Once again, Gov. Martin O'Malley has tried to show that he can be a player on the national stage and a potential presidential candidate. At a recent "Taste of Maryland" dinner, Mr. O'Malley tried to show Republican voters that he can move to the right by evoking memories of President George H.W. Bush's "read my lips" promise not to raise taxes and by threatening to veto the Poultry Fair Share Act, which would require large poultry producers to help...
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | February 12, 2014
Even though the " Poultry Fair Share Act " stands no chance of becoming law, the sponsor of the controversial bill to tax Maryland's chickens refuses to give up, saying he wants to have a public discussion on who should pay to control polluted farm runoff fouling the Cheapeake Bay. Sen. Richard S. Madaleno Jr. said Wednesday that despite a veto threat from Gov. Martin O'Malley and the withdrawal of a companion House bill, he doesn't plan...
NEWS
November 20, 2013
Phosphorus is a huge problem in the Chesapeake Bay, and its source is known ( "Farm pollution rule withdrawn," Nov. 15). It is an outrage that Perdue, for whom the farmers are essentially sub-contractors, can veto the effort to employ best available technology to reduce phosphorus runoff into the bay's waters. Dan Watson - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
While Butterball, the nation's largest turkey producer, said it was facing a shortage of fresh, large birds weeks before Thanksgiving, Maryland's poultry giant Perdue said it would have no trouble meeting demand. "Perdue is not experiencing any shortage of turkeys for Thanksgiving," said spokeswoman Julie DeYoung. "Our customers place their turkey orders well in advance of the holiday, and we have sufficient supply to meet those orders. " Butterball said its poultry had trouble gaining weight on some of its farms but did not explain why. The company still has ample supplies of its frozen large varieties, which are birds 16 pounds and heavier.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
Farming advocates are pressing Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski to reverse a little-noticed measure approved by Congress last month that rescinded tough new rules on the poultry industry - a move that has strained the already rocky relationship between mom-and-pop chicken farmers on the Eastern Shore and Salisbury-based Perdue. Under lobbying from the poultry industry, Congress quietly rolled back U.S. Department of Agriculture regulations that required chicken companies to give contract farmers 90 days' notice before yanking their business, mandated independent testing of scales used to weigh certain birds, and prohibited unfair or discriminatory business practices.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2010
The Humane Society of the United States filed a class action lawsuit Monday in New Jersey against Maryland-based Perdue Farms, accusing the nation's third-largest poultry producer of falsely advertising its chickens as "humanely raised. " The suit was brought on behalf of a New Jersey woman who bought chicken at a BJ's Wholesale Club bearing the Harvestland label, a trade name used by Perdue for birds raised in Kentucky and marketed as "purely all-natural" and "humanely raised. " The suit alleges that the poultry producer's marketing violates New Jersey's consumer fraud law. The complaint seeks unspecified compensatory and punitive damages against Perdue, as well as an injunction barring it from making claims that it treats its birds humanely.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | June 26, 1991
Perdue Farms Inc. in Salisbury is offering a free recipe booklet for use with its "Perdue Done It!" line of barbecued and oven-roasted half chickens, breasts, thighs and drumsticks.The booklet is available by writing "Perdue Easy Does It!" P.O. box 2417 E, Salisbury, Md. 21802.7+ Here are some recipes from the booklet:Creole Dip2/3 cup bottled chili sauce1 tablespoon prepared horseradish, optional1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley1 tablespoon minced scallion1 tablespoon minced celeryIn small bowl, combine all ingredients.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
Officials in Worcester County are investigating the cause of a fire at a Perdue Farms research facility that destroyed two poultry houses and killed 8,000 chicks. The fire broke out at 3:15 p.m. Wednesday, more than an hour after the four workers on duty to care for the birds had ended their day and left the farm in Pocomoke City, said Julie DeYoung, a Perdue spokeswoman. The fire in the 8-year-old, 22,500-square-foot buildings — two of 15 poultry houses on site — is being investigated by the Worcester County Fire Marshal, DeYoung said.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | March 23, 2013
Nobody asked me, but here are my six recommendations in the matter of the highly publicized, closely watched, widely criticized, rift-causing lawsuit brought by the Waterkeeper Alliance against the Hudson family poultry farm over alleged pollution in a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay on Maryland's Eastern Shore: •Everybody calm down, starting with the Maryland General Assembly. Already, the House of Delegates has authorized $300,000 — taxpayer dollars — for the legal fees of Alan Hudson, the farmer.
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