Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPercussion Instruments
IN THE NEWS

Percussion Instruments

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 16, 1995
"STOMP," the show that turns household objects into percussion instruments, opens a one-week run at the Lyric Opera House on Tuesday. The eight-member cast performs with brooms, garbage cans, matchboxes -- everything including the kitchen sink.Show times at the Lyric, 140 W. Mount Royal Ave., are 8 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday; 8:30 p.m. Saturday and 7 p.m. Sunday, with matinees at 3 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Tickets are $19-35. Call (410) 494-2712.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
With a name as, um, loaded as Loadbang , you just know you're in for something different from the musicians who perform under that moniker. The make-up of the New York-based ensemble is unusual enough -- voice, bass clarinet, trumpet and trombone. The group has inspired an unusual repertoire to match. I only heard the first half of Loadbang's concert for valuable Evolution Contemporary Music Series at An die Musik , but that contained a full dose of intriguing, not to mention challenging, scores.
Advertisement
NEWS
By EILEEN SOSKIN and EILEEN SOSKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 10, 2006
An excellent and early Valentine's Day musical bouquet can be enjoyed at 8 p.m. Saturday when the Candlelight Concert Society presents the New York Chamber Soloists at Smith Theatre on the campus of Howard Community College. Music of the 19th century is labeled Romantic music as a reflection, in part, of the late 18th- century German Romantic movement in literature and the visual arts initiated by writers such as Goethe and Schiller and visual artists such as Caspar David Friedrich and Philipp Otto Runge.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Aaron Chester and Aaron Chester,Sun reporter | October 4, 2007
Mickey Hart considers himself to be in the transportation business. The purpose of his music was not to entertain during his 25 years or so as the Grateful Dead's drummer, nor is it now, he says. Instead, the percussionist said his album, Global Drum Project, is meant to transcend consciousness and transport people to positive planes of existence. "It's about moving into another state of mind," Hart said. "You think differently. It's the neurology of rhythm, and we're master `trancers.
NEWS
By Dr. Gregory A. McPherson | June 5, 2005
As a fourth-grader growing up in Alabama, I was challenged, as were most kids those days, to participate in school fund-raisers. Our class was given the task of helping to raise money so we could visit the state capital, to learn more about our Alabama heritage. Ironically, it was still during a time of deep-rooted segregation and racism -- 1968 to be exact. Our teachers chose a fund-raiser requiring us to sell items with biblical themes -- framed pictures, watercolors and a vast number of little figurines.
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | March 13, 1991
THANKING THE CROWD for coming to the show is standard fare at any concert. It is the right and polite thing to do. But it isn't very often that you hear a performer say "it was my pleasure."When Paul Simon walked off the stage at the Baltimore Arena last night, it was hard to tell who was happier with the show -- he or his adoring audience of more than 10,000.Unlike 1987's overwrought "Graceland" production, there were no troupes of African dancers, no long-winded breaks in the sounds of Simon and no walking away with a feeling of unfulfillment.
NEWS
By Christy Kruhm and Christy Kruhm,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 16, 1996
STUDENTS at Mount Airy Elementary School embarked on a world tour Monday. They didn't have to board planes or boats for their trip; instead, they traveled around the world of music. More specifically, they took a world tour of percussion music.The vibrating sounds of drums beating, bells ringing and cymbals crashing echoed off the cafeteria walls as the Barry Dove Percussion Trio presented "Global Percussion" to students.Performers Barry Dove, Jon Seligman and Donna DiStefano kept the children entertained by demonstrating unusual sounds and music on strange-looking instruments that filled the school's stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
With a name as, um, loaded as Loadbang , you just know you're in for something different from the musicians who perform under that moniker. The make-up of the New York-based ensemble is unusual enough -- voice, bass clarinet, trumpet and trombone. The group has inspired an unusual repertoire to match. I only heard the first half of Loadbang's concert for valuable Evolution Contemporary Music Series at An die Musik , but that contained a full dose of intriguing, not to mention challenging, scores.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 15, 1999
Dmitri Kitaenko made his Baltimore Symphony conducting debut Friday night in Meyerhoff Hall with a program entirely made up of familiar-sounding music.Two of the pieces were indeed repertory chestnuts -- Bruch's Violin Concerto No. 1 in G Minor (with Evgeni Bushkov as the soloist) and Stravinsky's "Firebird" Suite (in the 1913 version). But the third piece, which contained the most familiar-sounding music of all, was probably new to most listeners.Composer Rodion Shchedrin's "Carmen" Ballet, which opened the program, was written for his wife, Maya Plisetskaya, the Bolshoi Ballet's most celebrated dancer during the 1960s and '70s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Aaron Chester and Aaron Chester,Sun reporter | October 4, 2007
Mickey Hart considers himself to be in the transportation business. The purpose of his music was not to entertain during his 25 years or so as the Grateful Dead's drummer, nor is it now, he says. Instead, the percussionist said his album, Global Drum Project, is meant to transcend consciousness and transport people to positive planes of existence. "It's about moving into another state of mind," Hart said. "You think differently. It's the neurology of rhythm, and we're master `trancers.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Reporter | February 25, 2007
To watch Savion Glover dance to Vivaldi's Four Seasons is to see a man trying to turn himself into a violin. SAVION GLOVER WITH THE BSO / / 8 p.m. Thursday and Saturday, Meyerhoff Symphony Hall / / 8 p.m. Friday, Strathmore Hall / / 410-783-8000 or balti moresymphony.org; 877-276-1444 or bsoatstrathmore.org Savion Glover Age: 33 Birthplace: Newark, N.J. Residence: New York Stage: Won eight major awards, including a 1996 Tony Award for choreography for Bring in 'Da Noise, Bring in 'Da Funk.
NEWS
By EILEEN SOSKIN and EILEEN SOSKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 10, 2006
An excellent and early Valentine's Day musical bouquet can be enjoyed at 8 p.m. Saturday when the Candlelight Concert Society presents the New York Chamber Soloists at Smith Theatre on the campus of Howard Community College. Music of the 19th century is labeled Romantic music as a reflection, in part, of the late 18th- century German Romantic movement in literature and the visual arts initiated by writers such as Goethe and Schiller and visual artists such as Caspar David Friedrich and Philipp Otto Runge.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | June 9, 2005
Talk about one man's trash being another man's treasure. Scrap Arts Music builds unorthodox musical instruments from materials salvaged from construction sites, metalworking shops, junk heaps and plumbing boneyards. The group has used old artillery shells, bicycle spokes, marine bilge hose, pots and pans (who knew they could be tuned?) - even submarine ballast. Their colorful creations, fancifully named the Mojo, or the Plankophone, are integral to their shows, which combine original music with choreographed movement.
NEWS
By Dr. Gregory A. McPherson | June 5, 2005
As a fourth-grader growing up in Alabama, I was challenged, as were most kids those days, to participate in school fund-raisers. Our class was given the task of helping to raise money so we could visit the state capital, to learn more about our Alabama heritage. Ironically, it was still during a time of deep-rooted segregation and racism -- 1968 to be exact. Our teachers chose a fund-raiser requiring us to sell items with biblical themes -- framed pictures, watercolors and a vast number of little figurines.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 8, 2001
New or recent music, of varying types and quality, cropped up this week at two venues. On Tuesday evening at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County's Fine Arts Recital Hall, pianist Paul Hoffmann and percussionist Tom Goldstein offered a program of works from the last decade or so - with one exception. That exception was an excerpt from Olivier Messiaen's gargantuan piano piece Vingt regards sur l'enfant Jesus, which has lost none of its bracing, individualistic quality since 1944.
NEWS
By Laura Dreibelbis and Laura Dreibelbis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 24, 2001
Sounds of drumbeats mingled with musical notes from piccolos, clarinets and brass instruments at Centennial High School for the first Howard County Music in Motion band festival in Ellicott City. With Atholton, Centennial, Hammond and Long Reach high schools serving as noncompeting hosts, the event Saturday featured performances by 11 high school marching bands and color guards from Maryland, Virginia and New Jersey. An exhibition by West Virginia's Shepherd College Marching Band told the legend of Billy the Kid through songs by Billy Joel.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 8, 2001
New or recent music, of varying types and quality, cropped up this week at two venues. On Tuesday evening at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County's Fine Arts Recital Hall, pianist Paul Hoffmann and percussionist Tom Goldstein offered a program of works from the last decade or so - with one exception. That exception was an excerpt from Olivier Messiaen's gargantuan piano piece Vingt regards sur l'enfant Jesus, which has lost none of its bracing, individualistic quality since 1944.
NEWS
By Laura Dreibelbis and Laura Dreibelbis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 24, 2001
Sounds of drumbeats mingled with musical notes from piccolos, clarinets and brass instruments at Centennial High School for the first Howard County Music in Motion band festival in Ellicott City. With Atholton, Centennial, Hammond and Long Reach high schools serving as noncompeting hosts, the event Saturday featured performances by 11 high school marching bands and color guards from Maryland, Virginia and New Jersey. An exhibition by West Virginia's Shepherd College Marching Band told the legend of Billy the Kid through songs by Billy Joel.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 15, 1999
Dmitri Kitaenko made his Baltimore Symphony conducting debut Friday night in Meyerhoff Hall with a program entirely made up of familiar-sounding music.Two of the pieces were indeed repertory chestnuts -- Bruch's Violin Concerto No. 1 in G Minor (with Evgeni Bushkov as the soloist) and Stravinsky's "Firebird" Suite (in the 1913 version). But the third piece, which contained the most familiar-sounding music of all, was probably new to most listeners.Composer Rodion Shchedrin's "Carmen" Ballet, which opened the program, was written for his wife, Maya Plisetskaya, the Bolshoi Ballet's most celebrated dancer during the 1960s and '70s.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1997
On the field outside Atholton High School in Columbia this week, Henry Mesias, a member of the Raiders Marching Band, shouldered a tuba and marched in curving patterns, in step with the other 100 musicians, color guard members and clowns.Some of his band-mates stumbled while lugging trombones. The color guard did one-legged jumps holding silk flags. Drummers sidestepped to sonorous trumpets and saxophones, marching with confidence.The band has spent 10 hours every week since summer going over its show, note by note, step by step, in preparation for the Tournament of Bands, which pulls together thousands of students from the East Coast today.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.