Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPercival
IN THE NEWS

Percival

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2002
ANAHEIM, Calif. - The anger comes from deep within, though Anaheim Angels closer Troy Percival doesn't really know how it got there. Maybe it's his competitive fire. Maybe it's a deep-seated resentment of opposing hitters. Maybe it's something beyond any explanation. The only thing he knows for sure is that there are two Troy Percivals - the nasty, malevolent presence that strikes fear into anyone in the batter's box and the easygoing regular guy who charms just about everyone who comes in contact with him away from the mound.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,Sun Reporter | March 29, 2008
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- New Tampa Bay Rays closer Troy Percival played golf once all spring. Percival has spent 12-plus seasons in the majors, and each spring he and a bunch of his baseball buddies hit the links after practice. But now he's in a new role: aging veteran amid players 15 years younger. "There's a pretty good generation gap," Percival, 38, said. "I'm used to coming into spring training and you golf four or five times a week. And here they play video games. They go back to each other's houses and they have the Internet and they play each other over the Internet.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2002
ANAHEIM, Calif. - Not much separates the two teams in the American League Championship Series beyond the cities they represent. Players are home-grown, drafted and developed in organizations that don't have the cash flow to spend recklessly on outsiders. Talent and runs are manufactured at an almost deliberate pace. So what will be the deciding factor that enables the Anaheim Angels or Minnesota Twins to crash the next round of baseball's October party? Where's the edge? Try looking in the Angels' bullpen, where closer Troy Percival, his blue eyes hidden by the brim of his cap, holds both a ball and the key to this series.
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2003
ANAHEIM, Calif. - Orioles second baseman Brian Roberts is trying to prove he belongs in the big leagues this time, and last night he made one heck of a case. Roberts came up with the bases loaded in the ninth inning against All-Star closer Troy Percival and hit his first career grand slam, lifting the Orioles to a 7-4 victory over the Anaheim Angels at Edison International Field. After looking lousy for two weeks against the Detroit Tigers, Chicago White Sox, Kansas City Royals and Tampa Bay Devil Rays, the Orioles took two of three games from the World Series champion Angels.
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2003
ANAHEIM, Calif. - Orioles second baseman Brian Roberts is trying to prove he belongs in the big leagues this time, and last night he made one heck of a case. Roberts came up with the bases loaded in the ninth inning against All-Star closer Troy Percival and hit his first career grand slam, lifting the Orioles to a 7-4 victory over the Anaheim Angels at Edison International Field. After looking lousy for two weeks against the Detroit Tigers, Chicago White Sox, Kansas City Royals and Tampa Bay Devil Rays, the Orioles took two of three games from the World Series champion Angels.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2002
NEW YORK - A strange sense of calm filled the visitor's clubhouse at Yankee Stadium after the opening game of the American League Division Series. Nobody panicked or cursed his fate. One defeat wasn't going to leave the Anaheim Angels shaken, even with the history of their opponent and quality of the stakes. "There's no such thing as a loss that's easy," said Angels manager Mike Scioscia. "It's how you respond to them that's important." The Angels gave Scioscia the proper response last night.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,Sun Reporter | March 29, 2008
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- New Tampa Bay Rays closer Troy Percival played golf once all spring. Percival has spent 12-plus seasons in the majors, and each spring he and a bunch of his baseball buddies hit the links after practice. But now he's in a new role: aging veteran amid players 15 years younger. "There's a pretty good generation gap," Percival, 38, said. "I'm used to coming into spring training and you golf four or five times a week. And here they play video games. They go back to each other's houses and they have the Internet and they play each other over the Internet.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2002
NEW YORK - His first chance to manage in the playoffs has brought all the second-guessers to Mike Scioscia's doorstep. Scioscia knew what was coming yesterday as he entered the interview room at Yankee Stadium before Game 2 of the American League Division Series. He reached into Anaheim's bullpen three times the previous night, but never touched closer Troy Percival. Left-hander Scott Schoeneweis gave up the tying single to Jason Giambi in the eighth inning, Bernie Williams followed with a three-run homer off Brendan Donnelly, and New York celebrated an 8-5 victory.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2002
ANAHEIM, Calif. - The Anaheim Angels weren't satisfied with ending their curse yesterday. They buried it beneath a pile of runs and danced on top of it. Adam Kennedy homered three times, his last giving Anaheim the lead, and the Angels stormed to their first World Series with a 13-5 victory over the Minnesota Twins before 44,835 screaming fanatics at Edison International Field. The Angels won the best-of-seven American League Championship Series, 4-1, with their only loss coming in the opener in Minnesota.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | September 13, 1998
As long as the numbers say the Orioles aren't out of playoff contention, Ray Miller won't listen to anything else, including reason. It's his job to push for the improbable, to keep stoking the fire even as the flames are reduced to a mere flicker.For eight innings yesterday, the embers were barely warm to the touch. Who could have imagined that the Anaheim Angels would wind up getting burned?Mike Bordick hit a two-run homer off closer Troy Percival in the ninth to tie the score, and Eric Davis singled in Brady Anderson to complete the rally and give the Orioles a 3-2 victory before an announced crowd of 48,038 at Camden Yards that appeared much smaller but sounded twice as loud as the comeback took shape.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2002
ANAHEIM, Calif. - The anger comes from deep within, though Anaheim Angels closer Troy Percival doesn't really know how it got there. Maybe it's his competitive fire. Maybe it's a deep-seated resentment of opposing hitters. Maybe it's something beyond any explanation. The only thing he knows for sure is that there are two Troy Percivals - the nasty, malevolent presence that strikes fear into anyone in the batter's box and the easygoing regular guy who charms just about everyone who comes in contact with him away from the mound.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2002
ANAHEIM, Calif. - The Anaheim Angels weren't satisfied with ending their curse yesterday. They buried it beneath a pile of runs and danced on top of it. Adam Kennedy homered three times, his last giving Anaheim the lead, and the Angels stormed to their first World Series with a 13-5 victory over the Minnesota Twins before 44,835 screaming fanatics at Edison International Field. The Angels won the best-of-seven American League Championship Series, 4-1, with their only loss coming in the opener in Minnesota.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2002
ANAHEIM, Calif. - Not much separates the two teams in the American League Championship Series beyond the cities they represent. Players are home-grown, drafted and developed in organizations that don't have the cash flow to spend recklessly on outsiders. Talent and runs are manufactured at an almost deliberate pace. So what will be the deciding factor that enables the Anaheim Angels or Minnesota Twins to crash the next round of baseball's October party? Where's the edge? Try looking in the Angels' bullpen, where closer Troy Percival, his blue eyes hidden by the brim of his cap, holds both a ball and the key to this series.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2002
NEW YORK - His first chance to manage in the playoffs has brought all the second-guessers to Mike Scioscia's doorstep. Scioscia knew what was coming yesterday as he entered the interview room at Yankee Stadium before Game 2 of the American League Division Series. He reached into Anaheim's bullpen three times the previous night, but never touched closer Troy Percival. Left-hander Scott Schoeneweis gave up the tying single to Jason Giambi in the eighth inning, Bernie Williams followed with a three-run homer off Brendan Donnelly, and New York celebrated an 8-5 victory.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2002
NEW YORK - A strange sense of calm filled the visitor's clubhouse at Yankee Stadium after the opening game of the American League Division Series. Nobody panicked or cursed his fate. One defeat wasn't going to leave the Anaheim Angels shaken, even with the history of their opponent and quality of the stakes. "There's no such thing as a loss that's easy," said Angels manager Mike Scioscia. "It's how you respond to them that's important." The Angels gave Scioscia the proper response last night.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | September 13, 1998
As long as the numbers say the Orioles aren't out of playoff contention, Ray Miller won't listen to anything else, including reason. It's his job to push for the improbable, to keep stoking the fire even as the flames are reduced to a mere flicker.For eight innings yesterday, the embers were barely warm to the touch. Who could have imagined that the Anaheim Angels would wind up getting burned?Mike Bordick hit a two-run homer off closer Troy Percival in the ninth to tie the score, and Eric Davis singled in Brady Anderson to complete the rally and give the Orioles a 3-2 victory before an announced crowd of 48,038 at Camden Yards that appeared much smaller but sounded twice as loud as the comeback took shape.
SPORTS
April 26, 1996
Angels: Lee Smith, major-league baseball's career saves leader, says he will ask to be traded or retire before accepting less than a closing role. "I don't think I could help the team in a non-closing role," Smith told the Los Angeles Times. "It would be like asking [cleanup hitter] Chili Davis to hit ninth. Do you think he'd be happy with that? You'd be taking a guy out of a position he's been pretty successful in for 15 years. If I can't do the job, I wouldn't want to be here anymore." Smith, a 38-year-old right-hander who has 471 career saves, was activated Tuesday.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | August 2, 1998
Who can blame Chuck Finley's Anaheim teammates if they're a bit leery of getting too close to him? Wander over to say hello and take a chance of being run over by a train or hit by a falling safe.This guy's luck is so bad, it's frightening. For Finley, it has been excruciating.He managed to get through Thursday's start against the Yankees without ending up in a hospital, which was a victory in itself. The occasion should have been marked by some sort of on-field ceremony. Still, he couldn't catch a break where results count, getting a no-decision despite pitching eight shutout innings in New York's 3-0, 10-inning win.Finley's superb performance, which included nine strikeouts, came six nights after he was struck just above the left elbow by a line drive from Kansas City's Jeff King, the latest in a bizarre series of mishaps.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.