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By Miguel Bustillo and Miguel Bustillo,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 28, 2003
A laboratory test of 22 types of lettuce bought at Northern California supermarkets found that four were contaminated with perchlorate, a toxic rocket-fuel ingredient that has polluted the Colorado River, the source of the water used to grow most of the nation's winter vegetables. The environmental group that paid for the testing by Texas Tech University conceded that the sample was far too small to draw any definite conclusions about how much perchlorate is in the lettuce Americans eat. But the organization, the Environmental Working Group, said the results were alarming enough to warrant a broad examination by the Food and Drug Administration.
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NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | July 4, 2009
As millions of Americans head out for their annual Fourth of July fireworks, they might not realize the chemical that makes the shows so bright also poses an environmental threat. But researchers are developing new, greener pyrotechnics that already are being used at Disneyland and some indoor concerts. The new fireworks use alternatives to perchlorate, a salt that provides oxygen to the combustible elements in fireworks so they can burn. The chemical is considered particularly harmful to pregnant women and small children because of its ability to block absorption of iodine in the thyroid, a gland that controls metabolism and growth.
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NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2005
Drinking water tainted by an ingredient in rocket fuel and explosives is less dangerous than previously thought, and the chemical might not cause brain damage in babies or thyroid illnesses at trace levels, according to a report yesterday by the National Academy of Sciences. The report said that perchlorate, which has polluted municipal water supplies in Maryland, California and dozens of other states, might be safe at levels at about 20 times the amount suggested by the Environmental Protection Agency in 2002.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2005
Drinking water tainted by an ingredient in rocket fuel and explosives is less dangerous than previously thought, and the chemical might not cause brain damage in babies or thyroid illnesses at trace levels, according to a report yesterday by the National Academy of Sciences. The report said that perchlorate, which has polluted municipal water supplies in Maryland, California and dozens of other states, might be safe at levels at about 20 times the amount suggested by the Environmental Protection Agency in 2002.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | October 4, 2002
The community watchdog group that monitors environmental cleanup at Aberdeen Proving Ground called on the Defense Department yesterday to authorize an immediate cleanup of chemical contamination found in the town of Aberdeen's wells. The call was made after tests this week found perchlorate, a chemical used in rocket fuel and explosives, in the town's treated drinking water at a level of 1 part per billion, the state's maximum allowable level. The test results spurred city officials to shut down one well and halve production at two others.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2003
Concerned Aberdeen residents are meeting tonight to try to educate their neighbors about the city's drinking water, which contains a hazardous rocket-fuel ingredient once used in training exercises at Aberdeen Proving Ground - and which the Army shows no sign of cleaning up soon. Members of a citizens watchdog group say they need more community support to press the Army to clean up the pollutant, a chemical called perchlorate, from the ground water that feeds the city's 11 wells "We have a lot of work to do to educate these people," said Glenda Bowling, a past president of the Aberdeen Proving Ground Superfund Citizens Coalition, which has been pushing the issue for two years.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2002
Aberdeen Proving Ground officials said yesterday that samples taken from Aberdeen's drinking water wells were free of the hazardous industrial chemical found recently in the ground water around the wells. "We didn't find any traces of perchlorate," said proving ground spokesman George Mercer. All 11 city wells were tested this week. "For the moment, [the results] give us some breathing room," he said. "We don't have to make a quick decision. We obviously have to keep talking to the city and to each other and keep reviewing."
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2002
Ground-water samples taken by the Army near Aberdeen's drinking-water wells contain a chemical linked to thyroid cancer, and a top environmental officer at Aberdeen Proving Ground says that discovery makes the area a "high priority" for investigation and treatment. The Army and Environmental Protection Agency stressed that no traces of the chemical, perchlorate, were found in the drinking water or in the 11 wells along the APG boundary. "It's not in city wells, but it's close -- too close for comfort," said University of Maryland toxicologist Cal Baier-Anderson, who works closely with the post on environmental issues.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 7, 2003
The Army's latest tests of Harford County's drinking water supply have turned up a low level of a hazardous chemical in the water, as well as in two of the county's five Perryman production wells, a county official confirmed yesterday. The drinking water was found to have a level of 0.47 parts per billion of perchlorate, said Jackie Ludwig, a water and sewer engineer. That amount is below the state's advisory limit of 1 part per billion for perchlorate in drinking water. Roughly the same amount was found in county wells 8 and 9, which are part of the Perryman well field along the western boundary of Aberdeen Proving Ground.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 3, 2000
Every morning for six months, 100 volunteers in San Bernardino, Calif., are dutifully swallowing pills. But these human volunteers - recruited by Loma Linda University Medical Center and paid $1,000 apiece - are not testing a new medication. The pills contain an industrial pollutant called perchlorate, a chemical found in rocket fuel. The experiment, which is funded by aerospace giant Lockheed Martin, is designed to see whether perchlorate pollution is harmful to human health. The intent is to develop data that could influence the setting of national and state drinking-water standards.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | December 25, 2004
When the news broke recently about federal researchers discovering a rocket fuel chemical in milk sold in Maryland and elsewhere, readers searching the Web sites of The Sun and other newspapers for information about perchlorate were directed to another site, called the "Truth About Perchlorate." This Web site, with its prominently placed link paid for by a group called the Council on Water Quality, reassured readers that the low levels of the pollutant found by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration "have no measurable effect on the body."
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2004
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has released data showing potentially unhealthy levels of a chemical used to manufacture explosives in more than 90 percent of the milk and lettuce sampled nationally, including milk sold in Maryland. Perchlorate - an ingredient in solid rocket fuel, bombs, gunpowder, fireworks and highway flares - is being studied by the FDA because of questions about whether it is contaminating food and water supplies, according to a preliminary agency report released this week.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2003
Concerned Aberdeen residents are meeting tonight to try to educate their neighbors about the city's drinking water, which contains a hazardous rocket-fuel ingredient once used in training exercises at Aberdeen Proving Ground - and which the Army shows no sign of cleaning up soon. Members of a citizens watchdog group say they need more community support to press the Army to clean up the pollutant, a chemical called perchlorate, from the ground water that feeds the city's 11 wells "We have a lot of work to do to educate these people," said Glenda Bowling, a past president of the Aberdeen Proving Ground Superfund Citizens Coalition, which has been pushing the issue for two years.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2003
Soil and groundwater sampling has turned up disturbing results in a boundary area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, where the hazardous chemical perchlorate has leached into the city of Aberdeen's drinking-water supplies. Perchlorate, a rocket fuel additive also used in explosive devices such as grenades, has been found in patchy concentrations thousands of times higher than in previous discoveries - but not in the immediate area of the city's 11 wells - raising new questions about the unregulated contaminant and how it may be spreading.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2003
Soil and groundwater sampling has turned up disturbing results in a boundary area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, where the hazardous chemical perchlorate has leached into the city of Aberdeen's drinking water supplies. Perchlorate, a rocket fuel additive used also in explosive devices such as grenades, has been found in patchy concentrations thousands of times higher than in previous discoveries - but not in the immediate area of the city's 11 wells - raising new questions about the unregulated contaminant and how it may be spreading.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2003
Soil and ground-water sampling has turned up disturbing results in a boundary area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, where the hazardous chemical perchlorate has leached into Aberdeen's drinking water supplies. Perchlorate, a rocket fuel additive used also in explosive devices such as grenades, has been found in patchy concentrations thousands of times higher than in previous discoveries - but not in the immediate area of the city's 11 wells - raising new questions about the unregulated contaminant and how it may be spreading.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2003
Soil and ground-water sampling has turned up disturbing results in a boundary area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, where the hazardous chemical perchlorate has leached into Aberdeen's drinking water supplies. Perchlorate, a rocket fuel additive used also in explosive devices such as grenades, has been found in patchy concentrations thousands of times higher than in previous discoveries - but not in the immediate area of the city's 11 wells - raising new questions about the unregulated contaminant and how it may be spreading.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | December 25, 2004
When the news broke recently about federal researchers discovering a rocket fuel chemical in milk sold in Maryland and elsewhere, readers searching the Web sites of The Sun and other newspapers for information about perchlorate were directed to another site, called the "Truth About Perchlorate." This Web site, with its prominently placed link paid for by a group called the Council on Water Quality, reassured readers that the low levels of the pollutant found by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration "have no measurable effect on the body."
NEWS
By Miguel Bustillo and Miguel Bustillo,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 28, 2003
A laboratory test of 22 types of lettuce bought at Northern California supermarkets found that four were contaminated with perchlorate, a toxic rocket-fuel ingredient that has polluted the Colorado River, the source of the water used to grow most of the nation's winter vegetables. The environmental group that paid for the testing by Texas Tech University conceded that the sample was far too small to draw any definite conclusions about how much perchlorate is in the lettuce Americans eat. But the organization, the Environmental Working Group, said the results were alarming enough to warrant a broad examination by the Food and Drug Administration.
NEWS
March 9, 2003
Maryland prosecutor handles investigation of Harford sheriff The state prosecutor's office has taken over the investigation of Harford County's sheriff, widening the case to include possible criminal misconduct. The move by the state prosecutor, acknowledged last week by law enforcement officials, halts a personnel investigation - referred Feb. 10 to Howard County police by the Sheriff's Office's second in command, Deputy Chief Thomas Golding - involving a complaint against Harford County Sheriff Joseph P. Meadows, 42. Meadows, who was on paid leave for much of last month, returned to work Thursday, saying, "I chose to remain on leave pending the outcome of our internal investigation, but that investigation has been suspended, and it is unclear how long the current investigation will be under way. The Harford County Sheriff's Office has many capable leaders in its Command Staff, but I cannot remain out of office indefinitely.
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