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By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | September 11, 2009
The Archdiocese of Baltimore released standardized test scores Thursday for the first time, showing that students who attend Catholic schools in the region score significantly above the national average. Middle-school students had the highest scores. Seventh-graders scored in the 73rd percentile nationally, meaning they scored better than 72 percent of other students on the math and reading portions of the Stanford 10, a nationally recognized test given to thousands of students across the nation.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
Are Howard County's speed limits too low or too high? That's one question some county officials hoped to answer when they reviewed a report of speed camera data from their vendor, Xerox State & Local Solutions. Traffic engineers have attempted for decades to set reasonable speed limits by analyzing traffic flow, setting the limit at the 85th percentile speed of vehicles on the road - meaning 15 percent of drivers travel faster than the limit. The thinking goes that drivers set a natural limit based on perceived risk.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2002
State education officials are expected to release the results of Maryland's rigorous new high school tests this week, giving parents their first chance to compare the performances of all public high schools. The new exams, which could become a graduation requirement, were given mostly to ninth-graders last winter and spring in five subjects. As the state ushers in the new batch of tests for high school students, it will also release the scores of the final round of Maryland School Performance Assessment Program exams, which have been given to all children in third, fifth and eighth grades for the past decade.
NEWS
March 7, 2014
Why would The Sun wish to keep safety lower than could be the case with artificially-low posted limits on the safest types of roads, the interstates and equivalent freeways, when the number of fatalities on those roads averages one per year ( "Sixty-five (still) saves lives," March 4)? The Sun must be in the financial pocket of the groups that make money from speed traps on safe roads where the posted limits are set far below the 85th percentile speeds of free-flowing traffic under good conditions.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2010
Baltimore City's first- and second-graders improved for the sixth year in a row on a standardized test of math and reading, with students scoring better than 50 percent of their peers around the country, school officials said Tuesday. Scores on the Stanford 10 have increased from the 38th percentile in first-grade reading in 2004 to the 55th percentile this year. Math scores rose during the same period from the 44th percentile to the 67th percentile in first grade. In second grade, scores rose from the 36th percentile to the 51st percentile in reading and from the 40th to the 61st percentile in math.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2002
Anne Arundel County sixth-graders posted a significant gain on reading tests in the spring after the first year of an intensive language arts program, while county pupils continued to score above the national median in all subjects tested. Scores went up in all subjects except science on the Terra- Nova, formerly called the Comprehensive Test of Basic Skills. For the most part, the gains were slight - a point or two - but officials said the county's efforts to improve instruction are paying off. "Anytime you show improvement you're pleased, because it's an indication that students are performing better and teachers are being more successful," said Interim Superintendent Kenneth P. Lawson.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2002
Anne Arundel County sixth-graders posted a significant gain on reading tests in the spring after the first year of an intensive language arts program, while county pupils continued to score above the national median in all subjects tested. Scores went up in all subjects except science on the Terra- Nova, formerly called the Comprehensive Test of Basic Skills. For the most part, the gains were slight - a point or two - but officials said the county's efforts to improve instruction are paying off. "Anytime you show improvement you're pleased, because it's an indication that students are performing better and teachers are being more successful," said Interim Superintendent Kenneth P. Lawson.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2002
Anne Arundel County sixth-graders posted a significant gain on reading tests this spring after the first year of an intensive language arts program, while county pupils continued to score above the national median in all subjects tested. Scores went up in all subjects except science on the TerraNova, formerly called the Comprehensive Test of Basic Skills. For the most part, the gains were slight - just a point or two - but officials said the county's efforts to improve instruction are paying off. "Anytime you show improvement you're pleased, because it's an indication that students are performing better and teachers are being more successful," said interim Superintendent Kenneth P. Lawson.
NEWS
By SARA NEUFELD and SARA NEUFELD,SUN REPORTER | June 13, 2006
First- and second-graders in Baltimore public schools showed gains on a national test administered by the school system this spring, officials announced yesterday. In reading, first-graders scored on average in the 46th percentile of the Stanford 10 standardized test, meaning they outscored 46 percent of children in a national sample. That's up from the 41st percentile last year. Second-graders scored in the 43rd percentile, up from the 41st last year. Math scores were higher still. First-graders scored in the 53rd percentile, up from the 46th.
NEWS
By Sam Stringfield | June 3, 2001
LESS THAN a year after the Edison Schools took over three Baltimore City schools, the State Board of Education had awarded it the right to expand each school from K-5 to K-6. The state board also permitted Edison to recruit out-of-zone students to its schools. After examining Edison's Comprehensive Test of Basic Skills (CTBS) data, a state board member was quoted in The Sun as saying, "I think we have to reward success" and "I hope Baltimore City will watch this very carefully." Let's examine each Edison school's CTBS scores.
FEATURES
October 30, 2013
Q: How do I know if I need to put my child on a weight-loss diet? What is appropriate for a 9-year-old? A: Interestingly, 20 years ago, there was little interest in weight loss in a 9-year-old child. It was assumed that this was the “husky” age and that he would slim down with the impending start of pubertal height gain. We have regrettably learned that is too often a false assumption. You begin with a visit to your health care provider to document the true weight, weight percentile, height percentile and the Basal Metabolic Index (BMI)
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2011
The performance of Baltimore's first- and second-grade pupils fell significantly in reading and math on a national standardized test, mirroring the drops on statewide assessments this year. The results show that the academic performance of even the city's youngest students has declined, in some cases by as much as 6 percentage points in a single grade and subject. While a news release sent late Friday emphasized that students are still performing above the national average in some subjects, the system acknowledged that the test scores are a "call to action.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2010
Baltimore City's first- and second-graders improved for the sixth year in a row on a standardized test of math and reading, with students scoring better than 50 percent of their peers around the country, school officials said Tuesday. Scores on the Stanford 10 have increased from the 38th percentile in first-grade reading in 2004 to the 55th percentile this year. Math scores rose during the same period from the 44th percentile to the 67th percentile in first grade. In second grade, scores rose from the 36th percentile to the 51st percentile in reading and from the 40th to the 61st percentile in math.
HEALTH
By Mary Carole McCauley | mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | February 25, 2010
It's enough to give even the most unflappable wife, mother and career woman a bad case of the blues. Last fall, University of Pennsylvania researchers Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers caused a stir when they published a paper in the American Economic Journal bearing the ominous title, "The Paradox of Declining Female Happiness." The pair, both faculty members at the Wharton School of business, found that women in the U.S. are less satisfied with their lives than they were 30 years ago, while men report feeling more contented - findings that were consistent across racial, economic and age groups.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | September 11, 2009
The Archdiocese of Baltimore released standardized test scores Thursday for the first time, showing that students who attend Catholic schools in the region score significantly above the national average. Middle-school students had the highest scores. Seventh-graders scored in the 73rd percentile nationally, meaning they scored better than 72 percent of other students on the math and reading portions of the Stanford 10, a nationally recognized test given to thousands of students across the nation.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,Sun reporter | July 1, 2008
The Knowledge is Power Program, which operates the highest-performing middle school in Baltimore, is seeking approval to open a new charter elementary school in the city next year, officials announced yesterday. The city school board has approved the creation of a second KIPP middle school for 2009. But KIPP is revising its proposal and asking to open an elementary school instead because of concerns that many students are unprepared for middle school. The program will have to submit a new application.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2011
The performance of Baltimore's first- and second-grade pupils fell significantly in reading and math on a national standardized test, mirroring the drops on statewide assessments this year. The results show that the academic performance of even the city's youngest students has declined, in some cases by as much as 6 percentage points in a single grade and subject. While a news release sent late Friday emphasized that students are still performing above the national average in some subjects, the system acknowledged that the test scores are a "call to action.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2002
The Anne Arundel County school board heard its staff deliver a glowing report yesterday on the first-year success of the expanded sixth-grade reading program - then heard parents call it a load of hooey. School officials said the program, which gives sixth-graders two periods of language arts daily, has improved the test scores of all pupils - black and white, male and female, good readers and struggling readers - except for Hispanics. Sixth-grade Hispanic reading scores have declined for two years running, and system officials were at a loss to explain why. They said they would look into it. But otherwise, staffers praised the program.
NEWS
June 10, 2007
John Carroll announces awards Emily Bates was named the Laura Pellegrini Award winner at the recent foreign language honors assembly at John Carroll School. The $250 award is presented annually to the junior French student who maintains a high grade average, demonstrates a love of French and intends to pursue French during senior year. The annual Annie Cumpston Memorial Scholarships, presented annually to three students who demonstrate leadership, academic excellence and love of school and community, were presented to Gabriella Denu, Class of 2010; Andrea Boyer, Class of 2009; and Eric Sneddon, Class of 2008.
NEWS
By SARA NEUFELD and SARA NEUFELD,SUN REPORTER | June 13, 2006
First- and second-graders in Baltimore public schools showed gains on a national test administered by the school system this spring, officials announced yesterday. In reading, first-graders scored on average in the 46th percentile of the Stanford 10 standardized test, meaning they outscored 46 percent of children in a national sample. That's up from the 41st percentile last year. Second-graders scored in the 43rd percentile, up from the 41st last year. Math scores were higher still. First-graders scored in the 53rd percentile, up from the 46th.
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