Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPepper Sauce
IN THE NEWS

Pepper Sauce

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | September 1, 1993
Do chefs really eat when they go home? Do they cook?Steve Sappe, executive chef of Truffle's Catering at the Belvedere Hotel, actually does continue to practice his skills at home, but makes sure the dishes are fast. One of his favorites is tortellini filled with cheese, garlic and herbs, coated with a quick red bell pepper sauce and dotted with slices of sausage.Although the creamy sauce would seem to very high in calories, there are clever ways to imitate richness. In this case, nonfat ricotta is thinned with regular or skimmed milk and added to a puree of jarred roasted red bell peppers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By SANDRA PINCKNEY | August 3, 2008
When my family migrated north from South Carolina, they brought with them precious culinary traditions passed from one generation to the next. Take rice, for example: It was rare not to find a pot of this starchy Southern staple on the back burner of my grandmother's stove. Another was the scrumptious vegetable stew that we called "granddaddy's soup," consisting of fresh corn, fresh tomatoes, fresh limas and fresh okra. And then, greens - mustards, turnips, collards or any combination of the three, served with hot pickled peppers on the side.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | April 7, 1993
It was spring and I wanted to enjoy some shad. I tried three times. I baked it at home, first in a bath of olive oil and lemon juice, then with bread crumbs. I didn't like it. In both cases the fish flavor was too strong for me.This was disappointing.Eating a plate of springtime shad was one of the Baltimore traditions I had wanted to appreciate. Over the years the popularity of the custom has diminished as spawning shad have all but disappeared from Maryland waters. Now, dinner-table shad have to be "imported" from other East Coast states whose river systems support a healthy shad run.There also seems to be a diminishing supply of shad eaters.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | September 7, 2005
AND THE PEPPERS trembled before me. Not only did I love the sound of that phrase, I was also wild about the aromas that accompanied the experience. It happened recently when I was grilling peppers, charring their skins until they turned black and their walls collapsed in a submissive heap. For reasons I don't fully understand, I found that both the sweet perfume of the roasting peppers and their collapse pleased me. Peppers are a fickle crop. Sometimes they are plentiful, sometimes not. This year the ones in my garden turned out to be thicker than thieves.
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2004
ST. MICHAELS - Pink flamingos, off-color drinking glasses and silly greeting cards lure tourists into a wacky store in a converted gas station here called Flamingo Flats. The kick they get when they see what's inside - 1,000 different kinds of hot pepper sauce - is like the kick some people get the first time they try some of these sauces. It's not what they expected. Weekends in St. Michaels, when the heat reaches 100 degrees and strains of Jimmy Buffett escape through an open doorway, some people seek shelter in spoonfuls of salsa so hot they carry warnings.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | September 23, 1998
THERE ARE A PECK of peppers in Boog Powell's back yard. There are more than 30 pots of pepper plants, each serviced by an automatic drip watering system.In Boog's refrigerator there are jars and jars of pepper sauces. The jars have handwritten labels that give a brief description and the vintage of the contents. "Chocolate Thunder 9/19/91" reads one label. "Trinidad Coffee, '98," reads another. "Cayenne 8/26/98" reads a third. Some guys have a wine cellar, Boog has a pepper-sauce cellar.A visitor to Boog's kitchen is likely to leave with not one, not two, but half a dozen jars and bottles of his pepper products.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 2, 2005
Jamie Short from Greensburg, Pa., misplaced a recipe for a crab-cake sandwich that he and his wife had so enjoyed at the Mad Batter restaurant in Cape May, N.J. Thelma Morningstar of Elkridge sent us the very recipe Short was looking for. She had clipped it from the recipe-request column in Ladies' Home Journal. Once you taste this sandwich, it is easy to see why so many people are so fond of it. It calls for just the right combination of seasonings and breading, and the red pepper sauce that accompanies it is a delicious addition.
FEATURES
By McClatchy News Service | November 3, 1993
Up to now, if you've wanted to order hot sauces, barbecue sauces, jerk marinades and other spicy foods by mail, Mo Hotta -- Mo Betta in San Luis Obispo, Calif., was where you turned.But now it's got competition. Javier "Papo" Muniz, a musician with a degree in sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, and Warren "Willy" Rosen, an artist and chef from Minneapolis, have teamed up to produce the Blazing Chile Bros. catalog.Based in Aptos, Santa Cruz County, they've assembled some 120 products, including Devil Drops, a rare sauce made from the datil pepper in St. Augustine, Fla.; Capital Punishment pepper sauce ("Once the bottle is opened, not even a call from the governor can save you")
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | December 22, 2002
For more than a decade I invited friends to our house for New Year's Eve dinner. But last year, feeling burnt out, I suggested to my husband that we forgo entertaining on Dec. 31 and eat out instead. We did, and I confess that I was disappointed. Although we had a lovely meal, I missed creating the menu, setting a festive table and inviting others to our home to enjoy this special night. This year I've decided to reinstate my annual celebration and plan to share the cooking with another couple.
NEWS
By Elinor Klivans and Elinor Klivans,Special to the Sun | May 23, 2004
Beach-house weekends call for no-cook meals that let you wind down after a long, hard day of sun and sand. Icy-cold gazpacho, thick with just-picked summer vegetables and "beefed" up with fresh crab meat, is a perfect choice. It is salad and seafood in one dish. Friends dropping in? Just double or even triple this expandable recipe. No food processor or blender? All you need is a knife to chop the vegetables and a big bowl to hold the soup. Need something do-ahead? Make the soup anytime during the day and add the crab meat when serving it. A lightly stocked pantry is the norm for any beach house, so it is a good idea to make a list of what you will need to bring along and what to forage along the way. From home, take a quart of tomato juice or V8 (that quantity will give you enough to add to the soup pot if your crowd grows)
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 2, 2005
Jamie Short from Greensburg, Pa., misplaced a recipe for a crab-cake sandwich that he and his wife had so enjoyed at the Mad Batter restaurant in Cape May, N.J. Thelma Morningstar of Elkridge sent us the very recipe Short was looking for. She had clipped it from the recipe-request column in Ladies' Home Journal. Once you taste this sandwich, it is easy to see why so many people are so fond of it. It calls for just the right combination of seasonings and breading, and the red pepper sauce that accompanies it is a delicious addition.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and By Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | January 16, 2005
Well, here we are again. Didn't I just review this place? No, that was last year, when it was Center City. Now it's Dionysus, an appropriate name for a restaurant and bar now owned by two bartenders, James Haf-ner, formerly of Brewer's Art, and his wife, Lynn, formerly of Club Charles. The setup is the same as it was a year ago, a handsome little business located on a really crummy block. Down a flight of stairs is a bar and lounge; upstairs is a good-looking dining room. What's different this time around, says Hafner, is that he and his wife have a clientele that they brought with them, they've made the restaurant's menu more accessible and affordable, and they've been doing some serious advertising.
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2004
ST. MICHAELS - Pink flamingos, off-color drinking glasses and silly greeting cards lure tourists into a wacky store in a converted gas station here called Flamingo Flats. The kick they get when they see what's inside - 1,000 different kinds of hot pepper sauce - is like the kick some people get the first time they try some of these sauces. It's not what they expected. Weekends in St. Michaels, when the heat reaches 100 degrees and strains of Jimmy Buffett escape through an open doorway, some people seek shelter in spoonfuls of salsa so hot they carry warnings.
NEWS
By Elinor Klivans and Elinor Klivans,Special to the Sun | May 23, 2004
Beach-house weekends call for no-cook meals that let you wind down after a long, hard day of sun and sand. Icy-cold gazpacho, thick with just-picked summer vegetables and "beefed" up with fresh crab meat, is a perfect choice. It is salad and seafood in one dish. Friends dropping in? Just double or even triple this expandable recipe. No food processor or blender? All you need is a knife to chop the vegetables and a big bowl to hold the soup. Need something do-ahead? Make the soup anytime during the day and add the crab meat when serving it. A lightly stocked pantry is the norm for any beach house, so it is a good idea to make a list of what you will need to bring along and what to forage along the way. From home, take a quart of tomato juice or V8 (that quantity will give you enough to add to the soup pot if your crowd grows)
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | December 22, 2002
For more than a decade I invited friends to our house for New Year's Eve dinner. But last year, feeling burnt out, I suggested to my husband that we forgo entertaining on Dec. 31 and eat out instead. We did, and I confess that I was disappointed. Although we had a lovely meal, I missed creating the menu, setting a festive table and inviting others to our home to enjoy this special night. This year I've decided to reinstate my annual celebration and plan to share the cooking with another couple.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | June 3, 2001
As a cook, I love the transition from the cold of one season to the warmth of the next because it demands a change in my style of cooking and entertaining. In my outdoor "kitchen," juicy steaks, lightly charred chops and ribs brushed with piquant barbecue sauce are grilled over hot embers. They replace my cold-weather menu anchors of roasted chickens, braised beef stews and baked casseroles. I like the casual ambience and the leisurely pace of backyard cooking and dining, too. For our first grill meal I plan to try a dish created by my good friend and talented cook, Jim Budros.
NEWS
By Jody Vilschick and Jody Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 15, 2001
Don't let Hunan Diamond's modest seating area fool you about what to expect from this Chinese restaurant. "We choose the name `Hunan Diamond' because women always like diamonds," says Melody Chen, who owns the restaurant with her husband - he's also the chef. "And, of course, `Hunan' came from an area in China with good, spicy food." It is worth noting that there are as many or more entrees with asterisks noting "hot and spicy" as not. Look beyond the egg rolls and the like for unusual appetizers such as Jumbo Shrimp Tempura, Hunan Spicy Tangy Wontons or cold Sesame Noodle with Cucumber and Peanut Sauce.
FEATURES
By MARY MAUSHARD and MARY MAUSHARD,The Evening Sun Turning Point Inn The Sun Sam's Waterfront Cafe The Sunday Sun | February 8, 1992
Brass Elephant924 N. Charles St., (410) 547-8480. The Brass Elephant, housed in an elegant Charles Street rowhouse, enjoys a widespread reputation as one of Baltimore's best special-occasion restaurants. Indeed, it is special -- pretty and comfortably formal without being stuffy. Service and food are generally good, occasionally excellent. The menu, reflecting the restaurant's Northern Italian leanings, includes pastas such as spaghetti carbonara ($10.50) and fusilli with crab and shrimp ($13)
NEWS
By Jody Vilschick and Jody Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 15, 2001
Don't let Hunan Diamond's modest seating area fool you about what to expect from this Chinese restaurant. "We choose the name `Hunan Diamond' because women always like diamonds," says Melody Chen, who owns the restaurant with her husband - he's also the chef. "And, of course, `Hunan' came from an area in China with good, spicy food." It is worth noting that there are as many or more entrees with asterisks noting "hot and spicy" as not. Look beyond the egg rolls and the like for unusual appetizers such as Jumbo Shrimp Tempura, Hunan Spicy Tangy Wontons or cold Sesame Noodle with Cucumber and Peanut Sauce.
FEATURES
By Tracy Sahler and Tracy Sahler,Special to the Sun | February 10, 1999
OCEAN CITY -- A former restaurant cook who grudgingly decided that a career in the food business wasn't for him beat five chefs and other competitors in the second annual Maryland Rockfish Cooking Contest here.Don L. Young of Chester, a self-employed certified water and waste-water facility operator who as recently as two years ago was considering a career in the kitchen, took home the $500 first prize for his Rock in the Rough. Judges tasted 10 entries before awarding the top prize to Young's dish, which matched grilled rockfish fillets with a tart relish; vibrantly colored, roasted red-pepper sauce; and crunchy leek strips.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.