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By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | June 15, 2008
Will was the model student, lacrosse captain, student president at school. The Harford Technical High School whiz landed a four-year scholarship to the Johns Hopkins University. Everyone who knew William Garrett said the intelligent, affable teenager would one day be the president. Soon after arriving at college, he started hearing voices. Will accused his father of poisoning their dog. His grades in college began to falter. And he began seeing things, said his younger sister, Nicole Kanyuch.
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NEWS
November 10, 2013
In response to a recent article in The Sun on the Maryland Center for Excellence on Early Intervention for Serious Mental Illness, Rene Muller suggests that murder may be an understandable response to overwhelming anxiety and trauma and efforts to treat these people with medications may be misguided. In the process of putting forth this argument in his commentary, "Mental health profession falls short in stopping violence" (Oct. 28), Mr. Muller reduces the treatment of mental illnesses with psychotic symptoms to the choice between pharmacological and psychosocial intervention and does his readers a further disservice by inaccurately portraying the mission of Maryland's Center for Excellence on Early Intervention for Serious Mental Illness.
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NEWS
By Mark K. Shriver | April 20, 2001
JOHN PAUL Penry has an IQ of 54. Ernest McCarver has an IQ of 67. Both men sit on death row, in Texas and North Carolina, respectively. Each man is mentally retarded. The U.S. Supreme Court will consider constitutional questions related to both cases this year. The McCarver case may well determine whether the Constitution permits the execution of criminals with mental retardation at all. Should the court make this decision, it would mark one of the most significant reversals in the law on capital punishment since the reinstitution of the death penalty in 1976.
NEWS
December 26, 2012
Horrific as the crime was, the fact that a Baltimore judge last week accepted Alexander Kinyua's plea of "guilty but not criminally responsible" in connection with the brutal beating of a classmate last May doesn't come completely as a surprise. Although successful insanity pleas are rare, Circuit Judge Gale E. Rasin said she accepted Mr. Kinyua's after finding "overwhelming" evidence he was suffering from a serious mental illness at the time of his offense. What the judge's ruling did not resolve, however, was why no one else seemed to notice Mr. Kinyua was going off the rails, or if they did, why they apparently did not get him help or warn others.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Mehren and Elizabeth Mehren,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 26, 2004
KEENE, N.H. - Until her first breakdown, Pat was trim and active, even playing on a volleyball team in college. But deep scars on her forearms attest to a lifetime of self-abuse. Pat, 53, grew sedentary, obese and reclusive. She says she has been hospitalized 25 times. "The sicker I got, and the more doped up I became, the more I tended to become isolated," she said. This year, Pat enrolled in a program called In Shape, designed to provide regular structured exercise for people with mental illness.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 3, 1992
BOSTON -- Alma Singleton, 73, once played cards every evening in the community room at the Codman Apartments, a six-story public housing complex for the elderly."
NEWS
By Paul Singer and Bryan A. Keogh and Paul Singer and Bryan A. Keogh,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 23, 2003
WASHINGTON - A presidential commission concluded yesterday that mental illness affects nearly every American family, but the nation's mental health care system is fundamentally flawed and needs a complete overhaul to focus on recovery instead of long-term treatment. The report stated that millions of people with mental illnesses in the United States get no treatment, and that many who do receive services get care that is irregular, substandard and far short of what they would receive for a physical illness.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1998
Medical ethicists meeting in Baltimore yesterday unveiled a 20-point national proposal aimed at better protecting people with mental disorders who take part in medical research.The draft report, which will be formally considered Tuesday by the National Bioethics Advisory Commission at a meeting in Miami, calls for a raft of new regulations as well as a standing federal panel to weigh in on research involving individuals with impaired decision-making skills.Although the plan may undergo some last-minute revisions this week, it is expected to be approved.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2001
When Howard County police encounter a person acting strangely, it's sometimes tough for an officer to tell if he or she is drunk, drugged or mentally ill, and possibly dangerous. "It's awful for someone to see a family member taken away in handcuffs if they're psychotic," said Donna Wells, executive director of the county's Mental Health Authority. Now, at least three nights a week, help is at hand. A county-funded Mobile Crisis Team consisting of two on-call social workers started Feb. 1. Craig Lea, 43, who works days at the county detention center, and Lisa Boettner, 39, who has a private practice and a background in law enforcement, are ready to help for five to six hours Thursday, Sunday and Monday nights.
NEWS
February 20, 1994
For years the nation's health insurance industry has discriminated against people suffering from mental illnesses. These unfortunate people had higher co-payments on doctor visits, shorter hospital stays and lower lifetime limits for hospitalization for their illnesses. Health insurers justified their discriminatory practices by claiming that mental illness was different from cancer, diabetes or multiple sclerosis.As a result, patients with schizophrenia, manic depression, obsessive-compulsive disorders or chronic depression had to dig into their pockets to pay for medicine, hospitalization or therapy visits that would have been covered if they had heart disease.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | June 15, 2008
Will was the model student, lacrosse captain, student president at school. The Harford Technical High School whiz landed a four-year scholarship to the Johns Hopkins University. Everyone who knew William Garrett said the intelligent, affable teenager would one day be the president. Soon after arriving at college, he started hearing voices. Will accused his father of poisoning their dog. His grades in college began to falter. And he began seeing things, said his younger sister, Nicole Kanyuch.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman and Steve Chapman,Chicago Tribune | May 7, 2007
CHICAGO -- In the aftermath of the Virginia Tech massacre, there was the usual debate between supporters and opponents of gun control. On one thing, though, everyone seemed to be in agreement: Seung-Hui Cho, whom a judge had found a danger to himself, never should have been allowed to buy a gun. But now that legislation has been introduced to keep deranged people from getting firearms, we find not quite everyone is on board. Under federal law, Mr. Cho was legally barred from gun possession.
NEWS
July 26, 2006
Mental illness isn't linked to violence The Sun's article "Hospitals face intrusion of violent world into facilities" (July 17) highlighted a violent event that took place in the Howard County General Hospital's Emergency Department. The article suggests a link between violent incidents and people with mental illness, despite the fact that there are no indications that those involved in the violence are or were mentally ill. As a forensic psychiatrist and former director of the psychiatric emergency service at University of Maryland Medical System, I recognize that one must always be concerned about the risk posed by individuals with cognitive, mood or psychotic disorders, especially in an emergency setting where little may be known about the patient.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Mehren and Elizabeth Mehren,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 26, 2004
KEENE, N.H. - Until her first breakdown, Pat was trim and active, even playing on a volleyball team in college. But deep scars on her forearms attest to a lifetime of self-abuse. Pat, 53, grew sedentary, obese and reclusive. She says she has been hospitalized 25 times. "The sicker I got, and the more doped up I became, the more I tended to become isolated," she said. This year, Pat enrolled in a program called In Shape, designed to provide regular structured exercise for people with mental illness.
NEWS
By Paul Singer and Bryan A. Keogh and Paul Singer and Bryan A. Keogh,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 23, 2003
WASHINGTON - A presidential commission concluded yesterday that mental illness affects nearly every American family, but the nation's mental health care system is fundamentally flawed and needs a complete overhaul to focus on recovery instead of long-term treatment. The report stated that millions of people with mental illnesses in the United States get no treatment, and that many who do receive services get care that is irregular, substandard and far short of what they would receive for a physical illness.
NEWS
By Jean Leslie and Jean Leslie,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 8, 2002
It's Thursday at 7 p.m., which means the Rev. Sang Hee Lee is holding an intimate service in the scenic Wesley Chapel in Jessup. The service starts with the congregation taking turns reading a difficult Bible passage in Numbers 16. Then Lee, pastor of Hallelujah Church, which is housed in the chapel, discusses it. "In this passage, the Levites tell Moses that they are angry with him," Lee says. "And what did Moses do when they attacked him? He fell to the ground and prayed. Instead of getting angry at the Levites, he prayed to God."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 23, 1991
A federal law that takes effect in July will provide far-reaching employment rights to the mentally ill, requiring most businesses to alter hiring practices and workplace conditions.Psychologists and government officials say they expect the law and the recently issued regulations explaining it to diminish the stigma of mental illness and reduce discrimination involving millions of Americans.At least 60 million Americans between the ages of 18 and 64 will experience a mental disorder during their lifetimes, government economists say.The Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990, which applies to all businesses with 25 or more employees, forbids employers from asking job applicants questions such as whether they have a history of mental illness.
NEWS
By Newsday | December 14, 1994
NEW YORK -- A simple, one-page patient questionnaire that provides an extraordinarily fast diagnosis of mental illness can help keep internists and family physicians from missing the first important signals that their patient may need help, researchers say.Testing of the questionnaire, conducted at four sites around the country, found that 26 percent of the 1,000 study participants had a diagnosable mental illness and an additional 13 percent had sufficient symptoms...
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 8, 2001
PEG BRIDGE'S son is 46 years old, lives in Howard County and suffers from mental illness. Perhaps it's no surprise that she's reluctant to share his name and other details about his life. Despite years of effort, a stigma clings to mental illness. But Bridge and others like her are working to erase that perception. Bridge, 74, of Elkridge was honored recently by Howard County for her work with the Howard County chapter of the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill, an advocacy and support group.
NEWS
By Mark K. Shriver | April 20, 2001
JOHN PAUL Penry has an IQ of 54. Ernest McCarver has an IQ of 67. Both men sit on death row, in Texas and North Carolina, respectively. Each man is mentally retarded. The U.S. Supreme Court will consider constitutional questions related to both cases this year. The McCarver case may well determine whether the Constitution permits the execution of criminals with mental retardation at all. Should the court make this decision, it would mark one of the most significant reversals in the law on capital punishment since the reinstitution of the death penalty in 1976.
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