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By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1999
A physician named Richard in a polka-dot tie is standing next to the holiday decorations and Christmas tree in County Executive Janet S. Owens' office.It's the county's holiday party, and he's been talking for about 10 minutes about diabetes research, something about presenting information to doctors in Philadelphia.Owens is nodding her head, seemingly engrossed. Is she, though? Her staff members aren't sure. They're shooting looks at each other, wondering whether they should cut in and usher the man along to the punch bowl so other visitors waiting behind him can have their chance.
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NEWS
January 9, 2014
As a good friend of Bishop Robinson, I read with interest Fred Rasmussen 's obituary of the former Baltimore City police chief ( "Bishop Lee Robinson Sr., city's first black police commissioner, dies at 86," Jan. 6). There was another part of Bishop's career that was omitted. For approximately 10 years, from the time he served as secretary of the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services until his 70th birthday, we were privileged to have him serve as a director of Mercantile Bankshares Corp.
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NEWS
October 26, 1994
A political novice when elected four years ago by voters in a throw-out-the-bums mood, Baltimore County Executive Roger Hayden has been largely what he promised to be in the 1990 campaign: a manager who would run the cash-strapped county as though it were an ailing corporation.To his credit, the Baldwin Republican balanced budgets amid huge reductions in state aid, even resorting to the first layoffs and government downsizing in county history. The Hayden administration can also take pride in its sensitivity to the north county preservation areas and its pledge to revitalize Baltimore County's aging urban pockets.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | January 5, 2013
For obvious reasons, the Ravens will be totally psyched to join Ray Lewis on his "last ride" when they take the field at M&T Bank Stadium in the wild-card round of the NFL playoffs on Sunday. The Indianapolis Colts also will show up with hearts afire for head coach Chuck Pagano, whose battle against leukemia has been the inspirational story of the season. If that isn't enough human interest for you, new Ravens offensive coordinator Jim Caldwell will be calling plays against the team he led to the Super Bowl three years ago and - since we never get tired of this - local fans will burn for a little more revenge against the franchise that deserted Baltimore nearly three decades ago. This matchup is so fraught with emotional subplots, it might be a good time to bring in a team of head doctors to figure out just how much all these mind games will impact the action on the field and the chances of either team advancing to the next round of the playoffs.
NEWS
January 9, 2014
As a good friend of Bishop Robinson, I read with interest Fred Rasmussen 's obituary of the former Baltimore City police chief ( "Bishop Lee Robinson Sr., city's first black police commissioner, dies at 86," Jan. 6). There was another part of Bishop's career that was omitted. For approximately 10 years, from the time he served as secretary of the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services until his 70th birthday, we were privileged to have him serve as a director of Mercantile Bankshares Corp.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | January 5, 2013
For obvious reasons, the Ravens will be totally psyched to join Ray Lewis on his "last ride" when they take the field at M&T Bank Stadium in the wild-card round of the NFL playoffs on Sunday. The Indianapolis Colts also will show up with hearts afire for head coach Chuck Pagano, whose battle against leukemia has been the inspirational story of the season. If that isn't enough human interest for you, new Ravens offensive coordinator Jim Caldwell will be calling plays against the team he led to the Super Bowl three years ago and - since we never get tired of this - local fans will burn for a little more revenge against the franchise that deserted Baltimore nearly three decades ago. This matchup is so fraught with emotional subplots, it might be a good time to bring in a team of head doctors to figure out just how much all these mind games will impact the action on the field and the chances of either team advancing to the next round of the playoffs.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2002
Tom McQueen's appearance before the Maryland Racing Commission last month was obscured by the smoke still in the air from the clashes among commission members, executives of the Maryland Jockey Club and leaders of the horsemen's association. It's a good thing for McQueen that his job isn't making peace among the bickering factions involved in Maryland racing. All he has to do is improve morale and customer service at Pimlico and Laurel Park. McQueen is president and chief executive of CorVal Inc., a Florida consulting firm with this motto: Maximizing performance and profit through people.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | February 5, 1993
Carroll Commissioner Elmer C. Lippy was surprised to learn he isn't always lovable, but Commissioner Donald I. Dell knew all along he was a shy guy.The two commissioners tried to figure out their personalities at a seminar Wednesday called "How to Handle Difficult People."Mr. Lippy is inspiring, outgoing, traditional and dependable, but sometimes is pushy, impatient, stubborn and critical.Mr. Dell is practical, reserved, calm and thorough, but can be shy, withdrawn and a perfectionist."As I did my own self-analysis, I found I was a difficult person," Mr. Lippy said with a chuckle.
BUSINESS
By Adriane B. Miller and Adriane B. Miller,Special to The Sun | January 7, 1991
It's a fact of hospital life that patients demand state-of-the-art treatment and care. Even the smallest hospitals offer a dizzying array of sophisticated medical services to patients, using elaborate computerized equipment to help diagnose illness and injury.Maintaining the equipment -- computerized tomography (CT) scanners, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, and other devices that help study body organs -- requires special skills. Not everyone with a socket wrench and knowledge of electronics qualifies as a technician.
BUSINESS
By Mark Skertic and Mark Skertic,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 16, 2003
CHICAGO - Chris Reilly had two reactions when he got a call from a Bank of America Corp. recruiter asking if he was interested in a job: He figured it was either a college buddy playing a joke or a headhunter who had found the wrong guy. But Reilly, an executive with Enterprise Rent-A-Car, quickly learned that he was exactly the sort of person some banks are now looking for. In September, Reilly, 37, was named Bank of America's consumer market executive...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | July 12, 2007
Jeffrey A. Bishop, a St. John's College official who helped enlarge the school's endowment and overhaul its fundraising, died of kidney cancer Saturday at his Arnold home. He was 59. In nearly two decades at the Annapolis liberal arts college, Mr. Bishop became the architect of large capital campaigns that brought the school new dormitories and renovated buildings, including a library. He helped raise more than $140 million and set a goal of having the college's endowment reach $100 million -- which it did in 2006, up from $10 million when he started working in 1987.
BUSINESS
By Carrie Mason-Draffen | April 18, 2004
The retailer I work for holds a mandatory meeting one Sunday a month, even though the timing inconveniences a number of employees. The meeting takes place either at 6 a.m., before the store opens, or at 6:30 p.m., after closing. Employees like me who work Monday through Friday wind up commuting to work on our day off. The company also expects us to cut two hours from our 40-hour workweek to avoid qualifying for overtime because of the two-hour meeting. The worst part is that sometimes we arrive for the meeting only to find out it has been canceled.
NEWS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 4, 2004
Carol Malinowski's ascent to the title of general manager at the Brunswick Zone Normandy Lanes -- a landmark on Baltimore National Pike in Ellicott City -- started quietly enough a little more than 30 years ago. Then, Malinowski often went to the relatively new facility to watch or bowl with her husband, Tony. Malinowski also loved to watch her two children bowl, and slowly, she recalled, she began helping with the kids' programs as a volunteer. But Malinowski quickly was offered the post of program director, a part-time job. That turned into full-time work, and, after about nine years, she found herself becoming general manager in the early 1980s.
BUSINESS
By Mark Skertic and Mark Skertic,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 16, 2003
CHICAGO - Chris Reilly had two reactions when he got a call from a Bank of America Corp. recruiter asking if he was interested in a job: He figured it was either a college buddy playing a joke or a headhunter who had found the wrong guy. But Reilly, an executive with Enterprise Rent-A-Car, quickly learned that he was exactly the sort of person some banks are now looking for. In September, Reilly, 37, was named Bank of America's consumer market executive...
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2003
Billy Parker is just a simulation - an actor on a computer screen pretending to be a depressed and possibly suicidal Army infantryman. But for Army chaplains who counsel thousands of soldiers, a conversation with Billy is as real as it gets. "It's very much like you would sit down with a counselee," said Lt. Col. Byron Simmons, a chaplain who has been testing the program during training sessions for other chaplains. "That's very, very important because it allows you to make mistakes with a virtual counselee rather than make mistakes with a real counselee," Simmons said.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2002
Tom McQueen's appearance before the Maryland Racing Commission last month was obscured by the smoke still in the air from the clashes among commission members, executives of the Maryland Jockey Club and leaders of the horsemen's association. It's a good thing for McQueen that his job isn't making peace among the bickering factions involved in Maryland racing. All he has to do is improve morale and customer service at Pimlico and Laurel Park. McQueen is president and chief executive of CorVal Inc., a Florida consulting firm with this motto: Maximizing performance and profit through people.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2003
Billy Parker is just a simulation - an actor on a computer screen pretending to be a depressed and possibly suicidal Army infantryman. But for Army chaplains who counsel thousands of soldiers, a conversation with Billy is as real as it gets. "It's very much like you would sit down with a counselee," said Lt. Col. Byron Simmons, a chaplain who has been testing the program during training sessions for other chaplains. "That's very, very important because it allows you to make mistakes with a virtual counselee rather than make mistakes with a real counselee," Simmons said.
NEWS
By Donna Koros Stramella and Donna Koros Stramella,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 12, 2000
A HALF-DOZEN AREA teens on a mission trip to the Appalachian hills of West Virginia thought they'd be learning about carpentry skills. But their weeklong visit also taught them to get to know people for who they are, not where they live. The six high school students from Holy Trinity Roman Catholic Church were accompanied on the summer trip by adults Sharon Morgan, director of youth ministries at the parish, and Ken Stanley. The Holy Trinity contingent was part of a larger group from other Catholic parishes and high schools.
NEWS
By Donna Koros Stramella and Donna Koros Stramella,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 12, 2000
A HALF-DOZEN AREA teens on a mission trip to the Appalachian hills of West Virginia thought they'd be learning about carpentry skills. But their weeklong visit also taught them to get to know people for who they are, not where they live. The six high school students from Holy Trinity Roman Catholic Church were accompanied on the summer trip by adults Sharon Morgan, director of youth ministries at the parish, and Ken Stanley. The Holy Trinity contingent was part of a larger group from other Catholic parishes and high schools.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2000
Seven-year-old Harish Lall put a dollar in his account the other day and vowed to keep depositing money until he saved enough to buy a $2,000 laptop computer. Getting to the bank, at least, will be easy: It's at school. Every Friday before class, Harish and other pupils at Swansfield Elementary in Columbia deposit their coins, bills and checks in the school's bank -- an honest-to-goodness, FDIC-insured place to hand over their money. That's because Farmers and Mechanics National Bank is backing the project, and the deposits are transferred to its vaults.
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