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By Philip Wuntch and Philip Wuntch,Dallas Morning News | October 22, 1991
Danny DeVito as "Larry the Liquidator," the gleefully remorseless corporate raider of "Other People's Money," is as perfect casting as Gregory Peck's staunch Atticus Finch in "To Kill a Mockingbird."And the teaming of the actors in "Other People's Money" is felicitous. In one corner: DeVito's diminutive, gargoylelike Lawrence Garfield, devious, shameless and proud of it. In the other corner: Peck's tall, granitelike Andrew Jorgenson -- old-fashioned, virtuous and just as proud as Larry, with more justification.
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NEWS
By Marta Hummel Mossburg | August 25, 2009
At least Maryland is not New Jersey. The recent federal indictment of politicians across that state shows that government contracts there are up for sale to the highest bidder. They hobnob with purveyors of illegal organs. Another bonus: Taxes there are even higher than in the Old Line State. Also, Maryland's landscape is beautiful. But politicians here still behave as if the rules of law and economics do not apply to them. Case one: the betrothal stunt pulled by Del. Jon Cardin, a Baltimore County Democrat and nephew of Democratic U.S. Sen. Benjamin Cardin.
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NEWS
By Clarence Page | March 11, 1996
ONE OF THE most difficult acts for African Americans is to give themselves permission to make money. I don't mean chump change. I mean serious money. White people's money.Instead of honoring those whose enterprise has taken them to somewhere within shouting distance of white people's money, we belittle them for even daring to think they can improve their condition, as if the imperatives of black solidarity precluded any of us from making an honest buck.Few were torn by this conflict more than my first wife, Leanita McClain, an African-American, ghetto-to-Gold-Coast success story whose upward climb was stopped only by the torment of her inner conflicts, made worse by clinical, and ultimately fatal, depression.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | March 17, 2008
Politicians take people's money with a promise to fulfill desires that supposedly can't be attained any other way. Prostitutes do the same, though by reputation they are more reliable in delivering. It's not surprising for people in the same line of work to gravitate toward one another, as Eliot Spitzer and a woman called Kristen reportedly did in a Washington hotel room. I understand why Mr. Spitzer's alleged hiring of a call girl was stupid, selfish, reckless, immoral and a betrayal of his family.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | November 28, 1994
Democrats would be foolish to run Jesse Helms off his chairmanship. His buffoonery is their only hope of getting back on top next time.Arnold pregnant is not half as funny as Arnold the scientist.Blue Cross of Maryland is asking regulators for the God-given, American right to go boom or belly-up with other people's money and lives.
FEATURES
By The Hollywood Reporter | August 18, 1994
Though not as aggressively as last year, CBS will again counter this year's Primetime Emmy telecast on ABC Sept. 11 with programming that targets the award show's core audience of women over age 30.Meanwhile, NBC will bring out the network premiere "Other People's Money," starring Danny DeVito.Adding insult to injury for ABC is the fact that one of the three programming moves CBS will make is the 8 p.m. unveiling of "The Boys Are Back" -- a sitcom produced by ABC Productions.Also in store that night is CBS' season debut of ratings powerhouse "60 Minutes" and a broadcast of Julia Roberts' box-office success "Steel Magnolias."
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | March 11, 1994
You probably don't realize it, but most of us live in a place called "Out There."The land of Out There is huge. It sprawls from the warm tip of Florida to the frigid Canadian border, and from New York to Los Angeles.In fact, it includes everything in this country except Washington, D.C., and the surrounding suburbs where the politicians, federal bureaucrats and news people make their homes.This much tinier community of Washington is known as "Here."I've become aware of this geographic distinction by watching the various Washington-based TV shows that feature big-time news pundits who discuss the great issues of the day.On most of these shows, one of the pundits will say: "Is this something that they care about out there or is it something that only we care about here ?"
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 3, 1994
Owing to a slight case of empty pockets, James is standing at Park Heights and Hayward avenues noontime Sunday, maybe a furlong from Pimlico Racetrack, with great big visions of economic grandeur or temporary solvency, of which he'll settle for either.He wishes to spend the afternoon placing bets on race horses, an act widely considered a long shot because of his complete absence of funds. But he has a plan, based on the subtleties of mathematics and sophistication, which is illustrated thusly:"Hey," he cries the moment he sees an approaching stranger, who happens to be me. "You got a dollar you can spare?"
BUSINESS
By Julie Kaufmann and Julie Kaufmann,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 30, 1990
John McGinniss is a real estate investor who understands the power of using other people's money to make money.When he buys a house he plans to use as a rental, he puts as little of his own money down as possible. But when it came to the house he shares with his family in Woodbridge, N.J., "I paid it off in five years."Why would someone who knows the rules of the real estate game forgo a tax deduction and a chance to let inflation help pay the mortgage in order to own his home outright?"It's one less thing to worry about," says Mr. McGinniss, 30, who wrote a pamphlet called "How to Save Thousands in Interest on Your Home Mortgage."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and By Glenn McNatt,Sun Staff | November 12, 2000
"Magician of the Modern: Chick Austin and the Transformation of the Arts in America," by Eugene R. Gaddis. Knopf. 472 pages. $35. I am continually amazed by how very small the group of people was that introduced modern art to America. Today, of course, we take the genius of Matisse and Picasso for granted. But it wasn't always so. First, someone had to persuade a few very rich people -- museum trustees, philanthropists, corporate moguls -- that the new art deserved their support. Not surprisingly, the most effective advocates were people just like them.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | September 12, 2005
LET'S BEGIN with the premise that this Orioles season is not exactly ending on an upbeat note thus far. Let's also agree that as they stumble toward what looks like an eighth straight losing season, the O's have turned off so many fans that Camden Yards is as empty as a New Orleans street corner most nights. OK, what to do about it? The obvious solution: Put a winning team out there. Winning solves all ills. Win and the fans come back. Win and all is forgiven. This is hu man nature.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2005
The women began to arrive before 9 a.m. yesterday, a full hour before the sign on the door said Martin's Bridal and Formal Shop in Arbutus was set to open -- and, as it turned out, two weeks too late to get in. At the close of business July 2, the shop and its affiliates -- one a national distributor -- closed their doors for good, leaving hundreds of brides and bridesmaids across the country without adequate explanation and without the dresses they'd...
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 5, 2003
WASHINGTON -- Like other hard-core, tax-cutting Republicans, President Bush has long declared that the government should keep its hands away from the people's money -- whenever possible, at least. So Bush caught some of his usual supporters off-guard this week by proposing a budget that asks some individuals and businesses to pony up $16 billion in additional fees to the government over five years. The wide range of targets includes war veterans, visa applicants, poultry producers and drug companies.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | October 7, 2002
WASHINGTON -- OH, WHAT a hero we have lost this day! What a patriot! What a self-denying battler for noble causes! But don't take my word for it, read it yourself in New Jersey Sen. Bob Torricelli's withdrawal announcement. Embark with him on the emotional journey back to his first political race. Chuckle as he recalls that his mother put him on the ballot for county committeeman when he was a mere college tyke -- and revel in how he won "two to nothing." Our knight is modest and self-deprecatory.
TOPIC
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 3, 2002
SAN JOSE DEL RINCON, Argentina - Probably because it is so small, or because too few people here have much money, this riverside town has no banks, no savings and loans, nothing of that sort. We are grateful. We have not had our peace disturbed by those who every day bang cooking pots outside the offices of savings institutions in the provincial capital, Santa Fe, about 10 miles down the road, and everywhere else throughout Argentina. This metallic cacophony is occasionally accompanied by violence, and always by an inventive variety of insults against bankers and politicians, provincial and national.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and By Glenn McNatt,Sun Staff | November 12, 2000
"Magician of the Modern: Chick Austin and the Transformation of the Arts in America," by Eugene R. Gaddis. Knopf. 472 pages. $35. I am continually amazed by how very small the group of people was that introduced modern art to America. Today, of course, we take the genius of Matisse and Picasso for granted. But it wasn't always so. First, someone had to persuade a few very rich people -- museum trustees, philanthropists, corporate moguls -- that the new art deserved their support. Not surprisingly, the most effective advocates were people just like them.
NEWS
By Sean Somerville and Bill Atkinson and Sean Somerville and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1996
To understand the pressure of managing a mutual fund, consider a question posed by Richard Fontaine, an alumnus of T. Rowe Price Associates Inc. who manages two funds:"If you had all your relatives' money and you lost it all, could you ever go to a family gathering again?"Such is the high-stakes grind faced by managers like Jeffrey N. Vinik, who quit yesterday as manager of Fidelity Investment's Magellan Fund; his successor, Robert E. Stansky; and an army of smaller players.Every day the market climbs to a record high, the manager is expected to climb higher.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 5, 2003
WASHINGTON -- Like other hard-core, tax-cutting Republicans, President Bush has long declared that the government should keep its hands away from the people's money -- whenever possible, at least. So Bush caught some of his usual supporters off-guard this week by proposing a budget that asks some individuals and businesses to pony up $16 billion in additional fees to the government over five years. The wide range of targets includes war veterans, visa applicants, poultry producers and drug companies.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 6, 1997
ME PERSONALLY, I don't like to take 15 cents from anybody, although I understand some of our politicians have no problem at all asking for money. My friend Ron Matz lent me $6 so I could get a couple of hot dogs and a soda at Carman's Place on Calvert Street last week, and until I get the money back to him, I'm afraid he thinks I'm blowing town on the $1.18 change I got from lunch.Everybody's not like this, of course. The credit card companies couldn't exist if people were reluctant to go into hock.
NEWS
By Sean Somerville and Bill Atkinson and Sean Somerville and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1996
To understand the pressure of managing a mutual fund, consider a question posed by Richard Fontaine, an alumnus of T. Rowe Price Associates Inc. who manages two funds:"If you had all your relatives' money and you lost it all, could you ever go to a family gathering again?"Such is the high-stakes grind faced by managers like Jeffrey N. Vinik, who quit yesterday as manager of Fidelity Investment's Magellan Fund; his successor, Robert E. Stansky; and an army of smaller players.Every day the market climbs to a record high, the manager is expected to climb higher.
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