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By DAN BERGER | March 24, 1993
The press conference was fun, Bill. We must do this agai some time.Chairman Zorkin of Constitutional Court urges compromise. Philologists in Congress of People's Deputies say Russian language has no such word.There's going to be one North American beer made in Mexico, one Euro-American car made in Belgium, one chip made in Japan and the rest of us are going back to the craft of broom-making that made this country great.
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NEWS
March 30, 1993
Although Russia's president and its congress agreed not to depose each other, their struggle leaves that country without orderly government. The congress did more mischief yesterday before adjourning, leaving ordinary Russians confused about what has been decided.The two sides are going to the people on April 25 in referendums that are supposed to straighten out this mess. But President Boris Yeltsin and the Congress of People's Deputies differ on what those referendums will ask. The administration of the election is in confusion, with the prospect of rival referendums raised by Yeltsin supporters.
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NEWS
March 27, 1993
The idea of a constitution survived this week in Russia. So did President Boris Yeltsin. Absolutism, a great tradition in Russia, lost.Mr. Yeltsin did not get to scrap the Congress of People's Deputies and its creature, the Supreme Soviet. The Congress did not get to depose Mr. Yeltsin. (The word used was "impeach," but it did not mean accuse and try; it meant kick out.)On the surface, Mr. Yeltsin appears a winner. His legend as a heroic politician facing down an armed coup or hostile Congress is burnished.
NEWS
March 27, 1993
The idea of a constitution survived this week in Russia. So did President Boris Yeltsin. Absolutism, a great tradition in Russia, lost.Mr. Yeltsin did not get to scrap the Congress of People's Deputies and its creature, the Supreme Soviet. The Congress did not get to depose Mr. Yeltsin. (The word used was "impeach," but it did not mean accuse and try; it meant kick out.)On the surface, Mr. Yeltsin appears a winner. His legend as a heroic politician facing down an armed coup or hostile Congress is burnished.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | December 5, 1992
MOSCOW -- A crucial measure that would strike a direct blo at President Boris N. Yeltsin's power is scheduled for a vote today in the Russian Congress of People's Deputies.The same measure had been scheduled for a vote three different times yesterday and was put off each time.Yesterday's session of the powerful but unwieldy Russian Congress saw Mr. Yeltsin's conservative opponents appearing to gain the upper hand. But it was also a day full of intrigue, private meetings, threats and deal-making -- and when it ended nothing had quite been resolved.
NEWS
March 30, 1993
Although Russia's president and its congress agreed not to depose each other, their struggle leaves that country without orderly government. The congress did more mischief yesterday before adjourning, leaving ordinary Russians confused about what has been decided.The two sides are going to the people on April 25 in referendums that are supposed to straighten out this mess. But President Boris Yeltsin and the Congress of People's Deputies differ on what those referendums will ask. The administration of the election is in confusion, with the prospect of rival referendums raised by Yeltsin supporters.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Staff Writer | April 15, 1992
MOSCOW -- A compromise preserving Boris N. Yeltsin's reform program was worked out between the Congress of People's Deputies and the Cabinet yesterday, averting a crisis that appeared to threaten the Russian president's government.By yesterday, the political turbulence that had looked so threatening turned out to be more like a thunderstorm that clears the air, in the words of one official.It was the Congress, after all, that did most of the compromising as the realization spread throughout the day that at this point there is not much of an alternative to Mr. Yeltsin's headlong plunge toward a market economy.
NEWS
By BONNIE ERBE and KATE WALSH O'BEIRNE | September 23, 1991
MORE than 15 percent of the members of the just-dissolved Soviet Congress of People's Deputies were women. Yet women constitute less than 5 percent of the U.S. Congress. Are we really as advanced as we think we are when it comes to male-female equality?*BONNIE ERBE: The long-awaited last gasps of communism provoked many stirring speeches on the floor of the Congress of People's Deputies this month. One of the most vivid, and least noticed, was delivered by Marina Rakhmanova, a pediatrician.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | March 14, 1993
MOSCOW -- Rejecting reconciliation, the Russian Congress flaunted its disdain for President Boris N. Yeltsin as it ended a turbulent four-day emergency session yesterday.Several members, including the speaker, Ruslan Khasbulatov, derided the president as the Congress voted to thwart Mr. Yeltsin's plans to hold a nationwide referendum before adjourning.The end of the session brought to a close a chapter in the bitter struggle for power between Mr. Yeltsin and his anti-reform opponents. And now those opponents clearly have the upper hand.
NEWS
April 17, 1992
Last summer, hard-line communists and Russian chauvinists fumbled in a coup attempt. This week, this same coalition proved too timid and disorganized to clip the wings of President Boris N. Yeltsin, making lots of noise but then surrendering without a fight. The reform movement won a respite of sorts -- until this summer.The summer will be crucial. Money from the recently announced $24 billion Western aid package should be flowing by then, enabling the Russian government to curtail some of the rampant inflation and chaos in the economy.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 24, 1993
The press conference was fun, Bill. We must do this agai some time.Chairman Zorkin of Constitutional Court urges compromise. Philologists in Congress of People's Deputies say Russian language has no such word.There's going to be one North American beer made in Mexico, one Euro-American car made in Belgium, one chip made in Japan and the rest of us are going back to the craft of broom-making that made this country great.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | March 14, 1993
MOSCOW -- Rejecting reconciliation, the Russian Congress flaunted its disdain for President Boris N. Yeltsin as it ended a turbulent four-day emergency session yesterday.Several members, including the speaker, Ruslan Khasbulatov, derided the president as the Congress voted to thwart Mr. Yeltsin's plans to hold a nationwide referendum before adjourning.The end of the session brought to a close a chapter in the bitter struggle for power between Mr. Yeltsin and his anti-reform opponents. And now those opponents clearly have the upper hand.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | December 5, 1992
MOSCOW -- A crucial measure that would strike a direct blo at President Boris N. Yeltsin's power is scheduled for a vote today in the Russian Congress of People's Deputies.The same measure had been scheduled for a vote three different times yesterday and was put off each time.Yesterday's session of the powerful but unwieldy Russian Congress saw Mr. Yeltsin's conservative opponents appearing to gain the upper hand. But it was also a day full of intrigue, private meetings, threats and deal-making -- and when it ended nothing had quite been resolved.
NEWS
April 17, 1992
Last summer, hard-line communists and Russian chauvinists fumbled in a coup attempt. This week, this same coalition proved too timid and disorganized to clip the wings of President Boris N. Yeltsin, making lots of noise but then surrendering without a fight. The reform movement won a respite of sorts -- until this summer.The summer will be crucial. Money from the recently announced $24 billion Western aid package should be flowing by then, enabling the Russian government to curtail some of the rampant inflation and chaos in the economy.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 17, 1992
MOSCOW -- Bucking President Boris N. Yeltsin's advice, the Russian Congress voted to rename the country simply "Russia," in an outburst of nationalist fervor that threw minority groups into panic over their future status."
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Staff Writer | April 15, 1992
MOSCOW -- A compromise preserving Boris N. Yeltsin's reform program was worked out between the Congress of People's Deputies and the Cabinet yesterday, averting a crisis that appeared to threaten the Russian president's government.By yesterday, the political turbulence that had looked so threatening turned out to be more like a thunderstorm that clears the air, in the words of one official.It was the Congress, after all, that did most of the compromising as the realization spread throughout the day that at this point there is not much of an alternative to Mr. Yeltsin's headlong plunge toward a market economy.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | December 25, 1990
MOSCOW -- The Soviet Congress of People's Deputies risked confrontation with the 15 republics by voting overwhelmingly yesterday for preserving the U.S.S.R. as a socialist country and for holding referendums on the union's future and on private ownership of land.Even President Mikhail S. Gorbachev -- still general secretary of the Communist Party -- previously had proposed substituting "sovereign" for "socialist" in the country's name to stress the republics' rights.Several republics already have dropped "socialist" from their names.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 17, 1992
MOSCOW -- Bucking President Boris N. Yeltsin's advice, the Russian Congress voted to rename the country simply "Russia," in an outburst of nationalist fervor that threw minority groups into panic over their future status."
NEWS
By BONNIE ERBE and KATE WALSH O'BEIRNE | September 23, 1991
MORE than 15 percent of the members of the just-dissolved Soviet Congress of People's Deputies were women. Yet women constitute less than 5 percent of the U.S. Congress. Are we really as advanced as we think we are when it comes to male-female equality?*BONNIE ERBE: The long-awaited last gasps of communism provoked many stirring speeches on the floor of the Congress of People's Deputies this month. One of the most vivid, and least noticed, was delivered by Marina Rakhmanova, a pediatrician.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | December 25, 1990
MOSCOW -- The Soviet Congress of People's Deputies risked confrontation with the 15 republics by voting overwhelmingly yesterday for preserving the U.S.S.R. as a socialist country and for holding referendums on the union's future and on private ownership of land.Even President Mikhail S. Gorbachev -- still general secretary of the Communist Party -- previously had proposed substituting "sovereign" for "socialist" in the country's name to stress the republics' rights.Several republics already have dropped "socialist" from their names.
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