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By Diana Schaub | March 24, 2010
S hould Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and the Supreme Court join Judge Judy and "The People's Court" on television? In a recent opinion poll, 61 percent of the respondents supported televising Supreme Court proceedings as good for democracy. The New York Times seconded that opinion, lamenting that the court, which has consistently and unanimously resisted such a move, "seems determined to keep its work out of the public's eye." First, a point of clarification. What would be televised, were it ever to happen, would be a very small slice of the court's proceedings; namely the oral argument phase.
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NEWS
By Diana Schaub | March 24, 2010
Should Chief Justice John Roberts Jr. and the Supreme Court join Judge Judy and "The People's Court" on television? In a recent opinion poll, 61 percent of the respondents supported televising Supreme Court proceedings as good for democracy. The New York Times seconded that opinion, lamenting that the court, which has consistently and unanimously resisted such a move, "seems determined to keep its work out of the public's eye." First, a point of clarification. What would be televised, were it ever to happen, would be a very small slice of the court's proceedings; namely the oral argument phase.
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NEWS
By DeWitt Bliss and DeWitt Bliss,Sun Staff Writer | March 3, 1995
John P. Zebelean Jr., a retired lawyer and former judge of the Baltimore County People's Court, died Tuesday at St. Agnes Hospital of an infection centered on the heart valves. He was 80 and had lived on Wilkens Avenue in Catonsville since 1925.Mr. Zebelean, who was an advocate of establishing a District Court in the county, served on the People's Court in Catonsville from 1959 until 1963 and from 1967 until 1971. The court heard minor civil cases.In 1965, he was named to the Baltimore County Bar Association's committee on the courts of limited jurisdiction.
TOPIC
By Michael Milleman and Michael Milleman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 1, 2003
William H. Murphy Sr., who died 10 days ago, will be remembered for many extraordinary achievements. But, the people of Baltimore will miss him most as a judge. For more than three decades, Judge Murphy was the people's judge. I use the term "people's judge" reluctantly because the television caricatures of "people's court" judges - anti-judges, really - have corrupted the term. In its true sense, "people's judge" describes Judge Murphy. In 1970, the people elected him to Baltimore's Municipal Court, the predecessor of today's District Court.
NEWS
August 3, 1993
THE following report comes from a Harford County father:The running debate in our family for weeks may have been similar to one raging this summer in many households with young children, especially boys: Could the kids see "Jurassic Park?"We thought our son, 6, should see it. He'd been particularly mature about the way he'd asked and, like many youngsters, reads a lot about dinosaurs. He knows that some of them ate other creatures and that they're long extinct. We tried to rationalize that dinosaurs seemed explainable, while, say, the bizarre criminality in the "Batman" movies, which we didn't let him see, did not.But plenty of fierce opposition to our son's seeing the movie surfaced from sources such as his maternal grandmother and aunts who had seen the movie.
NEWS
By Diane Mullaly | May 12, 1996
25 years ago (week of May 9-15, 1971):The Judicial Selection Committee of the 5th Judicial District was seeking applicants for District Court judges. The District Court system would be implemented July 1, replacing the People's Court. The two Howard County People's Court judges, Thomas Nissel and Charles Wehland, were automatically candidates for Howard County's District Court.More than 700 students and faculty members at Mount Hebron High School signed a petition protesting the proposed transfer of Patapsco Middle School eighth graders to Mount Hebron.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 5, 2000
SOMETHING happened. Once upon a time, Baltimore was a shot-and-a-beer kinda town. But not much anymore. This reality hit like an Absolut bottle to the head when TJI reader William "Wild Bill" Kautz stopped for lubrication at a tavern on South Bentalou Street in West Baltimore recently. The bartender, a woman who looked as if she'd been around the block a few times, asked what he wanted. "A Natty Boh would be great," Kautz said. "I'm sorry, hon," she apologized, "but I don't know how to make that one."
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 29, 1999
BEIJING -- Several years ago, police in North China's Hebei Province tried to extort money from a farmer by beating him until he confessed to an assault for which he hadn't even been present.After he spent two years in jail, the man's family hired a Beijing attorney, who won a reversal and then sued local police. The department settled last year, paying the man more than $3,600 -- a huge sum by the standards of rural China.With the help of new laws and increasingly sophisticated attorneys, more and more Chinese people are doing something that a decade ago would have been impossible: taking the government to court and winning.
NEWS
By JAY APPERSON and JAY APPERSON,Staff writer | September 16, 1990
He looks like a tough old bird, this Judge Curley.Leaning forward, he glares over the specs perched near the end of his narrow nose. Sixty-seven-year-old Tom Curley's hair, mostly gray with a few stubborn streaks of black, is wet-combed back. Mark Twain eyebrows climb toward the ceiling while he cocks his head.The look says: "Don't play games with me, friend." In fact, that's a favorite expression, an attention-getter delivered in a booming baritone with an accent born in Medford, Mass.Hearing the lamest of excuses, he rolls his eyes, sighs, shakes his head, glares again.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,Sun Staff Writer | March 20, 1995
Not long ago, people dressed for court the way they dressed for church. Now they dress for court the way they dress for a ballgame.Throughout Baltimore County's District Courts, defendants in dingy, torn jeans, T-shirts, baseball caps, tattered sweat pants and sunglasses wait for judges to decide their guilt or innocence. With even warmer weather on the way, tank tops, cutoff shorts and flip-flops will be much in evidence.Many judges, defense attorneys and prosecutors call the new mode of dress outrageous but no longer surprising.
NEWS
April 20, 2002
Rusty Burrell 76, a retired sheriff's deputy who later served as bailiff on the reality television show The People's Court, died Monday at his home in Rosemead, Calif. Mr. Burrell, who spent 25 of his 31 years in law enforcement in the court system, was suffering from lung cancer, according to the Los Angeles Times. The white-haired lawman was a real-life bailiff during a number of high- profile trials, including cult-killer Charles Manson and Patty Hearst, the newspaper heiress kidnapped by radicals who was later accused of joining their crimes.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 5, 2000
SOMETHING happened. Once upon a time, Baltimore was a shot-and-a-beer kinda town. But not much anymore. This reality hit like an Absolut bottle to the head when TJI reader William "Wild Bill" Kautz stopped for lubrication at a tavern on South Bentalou Street in West Baltimore recently. The bartender, a woman who looked as if she'd been around the block a few times, asked what he wanted. "A Natty Boh would be great," Kautz said. "I'm sorry, hon," she apologized, "but I don't know how to make that one."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 14, 1999
The state Court of Appeals disbarred a one-time Prince George's County prosecutor and People's Court judge yesterday due to his pattern of domestic violence and probation violation -- the first time the state's highest court has stripped a lawyer of his license because of domestic abuse.The action was taken against Richard E. Painter, who was convicted in 1994 of battery and illegally transporting a handgun in connection with family violence in Montgomery County, and had violated his probation.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 29, 1999
BEIJING -- Several years ago, police in North China's Hebei Province tried to extort money from a farmer by beating him until he confessed to an assault for which he hadn't even been present.After he spent two years in jail, the man's family hired a Beijing attorney, who won a reversal and then sued local police. The department settled last year, paying the man more than $3,600 -- a huge sum by the standards of rural China.With the help of new laws and increasingly sophisticated attorneys, more and more Chinese people are doing something that a decade ago would have been impossible: taking the government to court and winning.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1997
Ed Koch has tackled plenty in his 72 years, most notably during his three terms as mayor of New York. Which means he's hardly daunted by the prospect of taking over from the esteemed Joseph Wapner as judge of a new version of that '80s TV staple, "The People's Court.""I think Judge Wapner was a wonderful role model," the 72-year-old Koch says over the phone from his New York office, home base for a career that today includes lawyering, authoring, lecturing and -- beginning at 9 a.m. tomorrow on WMAR, Channel 2 -- judging.
NEWS
By Diane Mullaly from the files of the Howard County Historical Society's library | July 7, 1996
25 years ago (week of July 4-10, 1971):Judge J. Thomas Nissel was sworn in as the first judge for Howard County's District Court. The statewide District Court system is replacing the People's Court.50 years ago (week of June 30-July 6, 1946):Howard County residents are reminded that dog taxes are now to be paid at the Office of the County Treasurer, at the courthouse in Ellicott City, the same as real estate taxes and personal property taxes. The dog taxes were due after July 1.Pub Date: 7/07/96
NEWS
February 13, 1993
Statement of John S. ArnickSenate Executive Nominations CommitteeFeb. 12, 1993Mr. Chairman, Members of the Committee:First, let me thank you for allowing me an opportunity to appear today and present testimony to you to demonstrate that I deserve your support and confidence, that I have the experience, the temperament, the knowledge and integrity to serve as a judge of the District Court of Maryland for Baltimore County.I have served alongside each of you -- known some of you for the better part of our lifetimes -- we have fought many battles -- sometimes side by side and sometimes as opponents, but always with the best interests of the people of Maryland in our hearts.
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