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NEWS
July 25, 1999
"My first real, beloved, grown-up books were not the great classics many writers claim they devoured before they could digest solid food. They were the [British] Claudia books, which sucked me into the joy of total immersion when I was going on 15."I'm not even ashamed. I have a feeling that if I re-read this series now, I would still love Claudia, laugh myself sick, fall in love with David and suffer a physical shock and sorrow when their son Bobby is run over and killed."The books you love when you're young build your bones.
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NEWS
February 26, 2010
Contrary to Richard L. Lelonek's opinion ("Gasnler had little choice on gay marriage opinion," Readers respond, Feb. 25), the Full Faith and Credit Clause of the U.S. Constitution does not apply to the determination of the validity of a marriage, and Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler's opinion addressed that very point. While the Supreme Court has upheld the right of a state to full faith and credit in the recognition of judgments (providing that that state had jurisdiction in the first instance)
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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 27, 1991
Consumer confidence took its largest one-month leap in more than 20 years this month, suggesting a rosy outlook for the future, a survey for one of the nation's leading business organizations showed yesterday.But that does not mean that the typical consumer is rushing off to spend money and refloat the nation's economy, according to analysts.While economy watchers are eager to seize on optimistic reports, they cautioned that the end of the six-week war in the Persian Gulf on Feb. 27 might have injected too much optimism into the Conference Board's index.
NEWS
By HILARY E. MACGREGOR and HILARY E. MACGREGOR,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 28, 2006
He smiled when he saw the house. "He likes it," she thought. Then the smile faded, and a string of other thoughts flitted through her mind. "Oh, he thinks it's too modern." "Maybe he hates this part of town." "This is awful. We never agree." "The relationship isn't working." Such reactions - triggered by a simple change of expression - might seem bizarre to the secure and well-adjusted. But overinterpretation of a slight shift in expression can be all too familiar to the hypersensitive.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | July 1, 2004
BOSTON -- Maybe it was because the man on my left was doing a play-by-play when any member of the Bush team came on the screen. Maybe it was because the movie theater was within pitching range of Fenway Park. But halfway through Fahrenheit 9/11, I realized this wasn't an audience, it was a fan club. They weren't watching the movie, they were rooting for it. I saw this movie in a sold-out theater on a Monday night surrounded by people in their 20s. You go, Michael. If Fahrenheit 9/11 preaches to the choir, you could find me in the alto section.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | January 8, 1993
To "You are what you eat" and "You are where you live," a market research company hopes to add this advisory: "You are what you read."In a new survey, Yankelovich Partners concludes that what people read, particularly their choice of magazines, can more accurately forecast their behavior as consumers than demographic factors like residence, age and marital status."
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | February 24, 1994
NOT LONG ago I read that the San Jose Mercury News had published its first electronic edition of the paper on a computer.It is predicted by some that the computer will eventually replace newsprint as the bearer of bad news.As someone who has been working with news on paper for decades, I can only say: "Fie on computers and their information highways. The newspaper as we know it will never die."Let me make my case. Not a day goes by without us reading bad news. The only thing that keeps us from panicking is that we can hold on to the pages with both hands while we scan the grim headlines.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 28, 1994
CLIFTON, N.J. -- He surely felt his own tears, but the Rev. Michael Joly may have been the only one of the 500 people at St. Philip the Apostle Church yesterday who was unaware of the tears on the faces of his family and his parishioners.Father Joly, 28, who was ordained Saturday, has been blind since he was 5 years old. His fellow priests at St. Philip the Apostle say he is the only blind man they know of to become a Roman Catholic priest.Presiding at his first Mass on Sunday was an emotional triumph for Father Joly, a man who could not see, yet took on an education and a calling that are highly dependent on reading.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | December 29, 1996
Here we are again, confronted by the calendar's arbitrary and impossible insistence that we look back and forward at the same moment. I pray your private rituals serve you and yours well. Meanwhile, for public consumption, as a reader and as an editor, I have never been much impressed by the calendar-driven rituals that newspapers and magazines so often do at year's end and other annual landmark points.So on these pages we have avoided the usual clambakes: Christmas gift lists, summer reading inventories, the year's best this and worst that and suchlike.
NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | July 16, 1991
REPORTERS AND editors have traditionally used reader inattention as an excuse to take long vacations during July and August.We have promulgated the fiction that in the summer months, people are available to read only paperback books that can be left out on an Adirondack chair in the rain: books about carnivorous sea creatures, books about serial killings with Satanic overtones, books about the glamorous and cutthroat world of big cosmetics with sentences that...
ENTERTAINMENT
By JESSICA BRANDT and JESSICA BRANDT,SUN REPORTER | April 6, 2006
On Saturday, the CityLit Project will host its third annual literary arts festival at the Enoch Pratt Free Library. The daylong event, which celebrates the culture of literature in Baltimore, will feature three major book debuts and several poetry readings, as well as lectures, writing workshops and an open mike. Chicago-based performance poet Tyehimba Jess, recently named one of the 18 new poets to watch by Poets & Writers Magazine, will head the poetry schedule with a reading from his newest anthology leadbelly.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | July 1, 2004
BOSTON -- Maybe it was because the man on my left was doing a play-by-play when any member of the Bush team came on the screen. Maybe it was because the movie theater was within pitching range of Fenway Park. But halfway through Fahrenheit 9/11, I realized this wasn't an audience, it was a fan club. They weren't watching the movie, they were rooting for it. I saw this movie in a sold-out theater on a Monday night surrounded by people in their 20s. You go, Michael. If Fahrenheit 9/11 preaches to the choir, you could find me in the alto section.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 14, 2004
TBILISI, Georgia - As director of Georgia's National Library, Levan Berdzenishvili is expected to serve as guardian of his nation's culture, keeper of its collective memory and conscience for its political leaders. But each winter, the 50-year-old classics scholar faces an additional challenge: staying warm. He sat in his office recently wrapped in a thick sweater, cradling a hot cup of instant coffee. "It's very difficult to stay here," he admitted. "Sometimes it's impossible to work here."
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | October 13, 2002
Awhile back, I wrote a column complaining that many young people do not read newspapers, and seem to be more interested in Britney Spears than the Middle East. I assumed that this column would not offend anybody, because I was just kidding around. Also, I figured no young person would actually read it. Unfortunately, the column fell into the hands of Debbie Title, a teacher at Crestview Middle School in Ellisville, Mo., who did something unspeakably vicious: She used my column as a classroom assignment.
NEWS
July 25, 1999
"My first real, beloved, grown-up books were not the great classics many writers claim they devoured before they could digest solid food. They were the [British] Claudia books, which sucked me into the joy of total immersion when I was going on 15."I'm not even ashamed. I have a feeling that if I re-read this series now, I would still love Claudia, laugh myself sick, fall in love with David and suffer a physical shock and sorrow when their son Bobby is run over and killed."The books you love when you're young build your bones.
FEATURES
By Melody Holmes and Melody Holmes,SUN STAFF | July 5, 1999
The harsh words of critics, angry e-mails, nasty letters -- nothing seems to be able to unwrap Aaron McGruder's fingers from around the pen he uses to create not only cartoons, but controversy. McGruder, of Columbia, is the creator of "The Boondocks," a new comic strip about two black kids from Chicago, Huey and Riley, who move far from their urban element into a predominantly white suburb. In the 2 1/2 months the strip has been on newspaper comics pages -- including The Sun's -- 24-year-old McGruder has endured a lifetime's worth of criticism.
NEWS
By HILARY E. MACGREGOR and HILARY E. MACGREGOR,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 28, 2006
He smiled when he saw the house. "He likes it," she thought. Then the smile faded, and a string of other thoughts flitted through her mind. "Oh, he thinks it's too modern." "Maybe he hates this part of town." "This is awful. We never agree." "The relationship isn't working." Such reactions - triggered by a simple change of expression - might seem bizarre to the secure and well-adjusted. But overinterpretation of a slight shift in expression can be all too familiar to the hypersensitive.
FEATURES
By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | October 1, 1990
YOU KNOW WHAT'S great about Americans?" asked Slats Grobnik. "We're so cool, that's what."What prompts that proud observation?"Well, just listen to what people are talking about."
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | April 4, 1999
So you want to be a Klingon, a sci-fi warrior of the universe? Here are some fashion tips:Make sure your gruesome, lumpy, latex forehead matches your skin color. (Use grease-paint or powder). Two-tone Klingons are a big no-no.Put hook-and-loop fasteners on the furry sleeves of your vinyl chest armor so you can strip them off. (It can get awfully steamy being a "Star Trek" warrior.)And please, don't wear glasses, at least not for the pictures."The idea is to be believable," explains Brad Graper, 44, an Edgewood computer specialist, otherwise known as BuraD, squadron commander of three spaceships.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | December 29, 1996
Here we are again, confronted by the calendar's arbitrary and impossible insistence that we look back and forward at the same moment. I pray your private rituals serve you and yours well. Meanwhile, for public consumption, as a reader and as an editor, I have never been much impressed by the calendar-driven rituals that newspapers and magazines so often do at year's end and other annual landmark points.So on these pages we have avoided the usual clambakes: Christmas gift lists, summer reading inventories, the year's best this and worst that and suchlike.
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