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By Molly Ivins | February 25, 1992
Austin, Tex. -- AND THE herd of presidential candidates rounds that first curve and heads south -- thundering into Dixie prepared to eat grits and talk down to the populace. We are about to witness the quadrennial political effects of the popular assumption that a southern accent is the equivalent of a low I.Q.One might hope that the enduring stereotype of Southerners as a collection of slope-browed ridge-runners would have been shaken by the results the last time out. You remember 1988, when all the candidates came south and carried on obligingly about the need for a strong national defense, daringly endorsed traditional family values and courageously committed to no-new-taxes.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 13, 2003
WASHINGTON - New government figures show a profound change in welfare spending, money shifted from cash assistance into child care, education, training and other services intended to help poor people get jobs and stay off welfare. Cash assistance payments now account for less than half of all spending under the nation's main welfare program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, federal officials say. The proportion has been declining steadily since 1996, when Congress revamped welfare and abolished the guarantee of cash assistance for the nation's poorest children.
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NEWS
September 6, 1992
Focus on values is financial issueFrom: Robert Ryan TouseyEllicott CityAccording to statistics compiled by the House Ways and Means Committee, a return to family values could dramatically reduce the number of people going on welfare. These statistics demonstrate that three quarters of our nation's welfare recipients are on welfare as a direct result of the decline in family values (45 percent because of divorce and separation and 30 percent due to a child born out of wedlock).Our nation would be a better place if people took the commitment to marriage more seriously and if fathers stayed around to support their children both emotionally and financially.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2003
While traditional cash payments to welfare recipients continue to drop in Maryland overall - especially in Baltimore - prosperous Howard and Harford counties are seeing sharply higher numbers of people going on assistance rolls. Disturbed by the trend - a 94 percent increase in Howard and a 59 percent jump in Harford over two years and lesser increases in other suburbs - state Department of Human Resources officials commissioned a study by the Regional Economic Studies Institute at Towson University, which blamed recession-related unemployment intensified by the terrorist attacks of 9/11.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 19, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Millions of people have left the welfare rolls since Congress overhauled the federal program two years ago, but what happened to them has been a puzzle for policy-makers.Now, the most comprehensive study of the new system says more and more are going to work.The General Accounting Office, a nonpartisan arm of Congress, said yesterday that there had been sharp increases in the proportion of welfare recipients being placed in jobs.Since President Clinton took office, the number of people on welfare has fallen 37 percent, to 8.9 million in March 1998 from 14.1 million in January 1993.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 19, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Under attack by Sen. Bob Dole for having twice vetoed welfare legislation, President Clinton gave his blessing yesterday to the most radical of all state welfare experiments, which would abolish the federal guarantee of cash assistance for poor children in Wisconsin and replace it with wage subsidies for single mothers who work.The program, which has been hailed as an innovative way to move people from welfare to work, was devised mainly by Gov. Tommy G. Thompson of Wisconsin, a Republican often mentioned as a possible running mate for Dole in this year's presidential election.
NEWS
By Bob Herbert | November 17, 1994
TROUBLED TIMES require the comforting presence of scapegoats. I remember an incident many years ago in which a thin, bespectacled, awkward and dim-witted recruit at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., was beaten up by fellow soldiers who blamed him for a blizzard that had confined everybody to the base.A delighted roar arose when the hapless recruit was tossed out of the barracks and into the snow. The scapegoat had done his job. He had made everybody feel better, even though nothing had changed.The Republican Party, delirious with its recent successes but lacking any solutions to the very serious problems that underlie the voters' unease, has accelerated its cruel tactic of demonizing people on welfare.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | November 13, 1991
Washington -- GOV. BILL CLINTON of Arkansas has good reason to be delighted by the thrust taken at him by Gov. Mario Cuomo of New York. But Democrats who have been waiting breathlessly for Cuomo to save the day may have reason for uneasiness.In Clinton's case, the episode is pure political gold. Since Cuomo would be the instant frontrunner if he entered the competition for the Democratic presidential nomination, the imperative for each of the six already in the field is to get himself juxtaposed against Cuomo as his principal adversary.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 16, 1993
RIVERSIDE, Calif. -- After a decade of nationa experimentation, no program has done as much to raise the earnings of people on welfare as one here in Riverside County, and its workings can be seen in the gains, losses and dish-worn hands of Janice McClung.The philosophy here is unromantic: Get a job, any job, even a low-paying, unpleasant job. That cuts across the more prevalent national practice, which stresses education and training first, in the hope that people on welfare can earn more later.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 8, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Billions of dollars in federal welfare money is piling up in the Treasury, unused by state officials, who won control of the money in 1996 by arguing that they knew best how to spend it for the benefit of poor people.More than half the states failed to use the full amounts of their federal welfare grants last year, federal and state officials say. Data compiled by the Department of Health and Human Services show that states had an unused balance of $3 billion, out of $12 billion made available in the first nine months of last year.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2000
Although Maryland has been sending welfare recipients off the rolls and into work in dramatic numbers, its progress in reducing caseloads is starting to slow, mirroring a trend across the country. Among those who remain are faces both new and known to the system - an illustration, officials say, that even though President Clinton promised three years ago to "end welfare as we know it," welfare in some form likely will always be with us. Between January and May last year, for example, Maryland's assistance rolls fell by nearly 10,000 people.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 8, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Billions of dollars in federal welfare money is piling up in the Treasury, unused by state officials, who won control of the money in 1996 by arguing that they knew best how to spend it for the benefit of poor people.More than half the states failed to use the full amounts of their federal welfare grants last year, federal and state officials say. Data compiled by the Department of Health and Human Services show that states had an unused balance of $3 billion, out of $12 billion made available in the first nine months of last year.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 19, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Millions of people have left the welfare rolls since Congress overhauled the federal program two years ago, but what happened to them has been a puzzle for policy-makers.Now, the most comprehensive study of the new system says more and more are going to work.The General Accounting Office, a nonpartisan arm of Congress, said yesterday that there had been sharp increases in the proportion of welfare recipients being placed in jobs.Since President Clinton took office, the number of people on welfare has fallen 37 percent, to 8.9 million in March 1998 from 14.1 million in January 1993.
NEWS
By Carrie Rickey and Carrie Rickey,PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER Knight-Ridder/Tribune Information Services | January 5, 1997
She has evolved, this creature who jokingly calls herself "the ++ Mighty Afro-Deity," from the girl born Caryn to the life forcecalled Whoopi. She has gone from welfare mom to philanthropist, from street performer to movie star, from sham spiritualist Oda Mae Brown in "Ghost" to real-life civil rights activist Myrlie Evers in the new film "Ghosts of Mississippi."This crowded week, she will emcee an AIDS benefit at Manhattan's Riverside Church, meet reporters for "Ghosts of Mississippi," and begin rehearsals for her return to Broadway in February, when she will replace Nathan Lane in "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 1, 1996
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Deborah C. Washam shook her head with an emotion that appeared to be equal parts sorrow and exasperation.Of the more than 80 women she has hired over the past 17 months as part of a generous welfare-to-work program sponsored in part by Kansas City's corporate community, fewer than 25 remain on the job. Many of the others quit in a huff over perceived slights -- Washam calls it their refusal to follow directions."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 19, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Under attack by Sen. Bob Dole for having twice vetoed welfare legislation, President Clinton gave his blessing yesterday to the most radical of all state welfare experiments, which would abolish the federal guarantee of cash assistance for poor children in Wisconsin and replace it with wage subsidies for single mothers who work.The program, which has been hailed as an innovative way to move people from welfare to work, was devised mainly by Gov. Tommy G. Thompson of Wisconsin, a Republican often mentioned as a possible running mate for Dole in this year's presidential election.
NEWS
By RHONDA WILLIAMS | November 11, 1994
College Park. -- There was one clear loser in this election season: welfare reform. Many Republicans won, some Democrats won, but the poor lost in virtually every race.Both parties followed a simple election strategy: Whoever dies with the most welfare cadavers wins. Because they didn't deliver on President Clinton's promise to ''end welfare as we know it,'' the Democrats escalated their rhetoric to assure voters that they can still do the job. Even long-term liberals like Ted Kennedy of Massachusetts jumped on the bandwagon, promising to put welfare recipients to work.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 13, 2003
WASHINGTON - New government figures show a profound change in welfare spending, money shifted from cash assistance into child care, education, training and other services intended to help poor people get jobs and stay off welfare. Cash assistance payments now account for less than half of all spending under the nation's main welfare program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, federal officials say. The proportion has been declining steadily since 1996, when Congress revamped welfare and abolished the guarantee of cash assistance for the nation's poorest children.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | April 21, 1996
THE FAILURE of three decades of social spending to solve the problems of poverty in America has spawned a backlash. At some point, even the most patient citizen will rise up and demand a dollar's worth of results for a dollar's worth of taxes.Nowhere is that backlash more evident than in the battle cry of ''welfare reform.'' From Capitol Hill and the White House to Annapolis and state capitals across the country, politicians are promising, as President Clinton did, to ''end welfare as we know it.''And who could object?
NEWS
By Christina Asquith and Christina Asquith,Sun Staff Writer | August 16, 1995
The day after receiving federal approval to reform the welfare system, county officials and welfare recipients gathered last night to discuss what they see as the biggest obstacles to change -- poor communication, deadbeat dads and a lack of transportation for working mothers.Sitting around a table at the Glen Burnie United Methodist Church, state Del. John R. Leopold and members of the county Department of Social Services listened as Beverly Conroy, who has been on and off welfare for 12 years, recommended reforms.
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