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NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | October 21, 1993
U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Donna E. Shalala assured a Baltimore audience yesterday that welfare and health care reforms of the Clinton administration will reinforce such traditional American values as the "work ethic" and the "sanctity of the family.""We can no longer afford a one-size-fits-all bureaucratic method," Ms. Shalala said."We need an approach tailored to the individual needs of each family . . . that respects the sanctity of the family . . . that keeps families together."
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NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2000
A proposal to help some of Baltimore's poor move near jobs in the suburbs has died in Annapolis after a powerful Baltimore County lawmaker declared it too ambitious for the General Assembly. Senate Republican leader Martin G. Madden has dropped his proposal to launch a three-year, $3.75 million pilot program to help pay moving expenses for 1,500 families who have been on welfare and want to live closer to jobs. Up to 700 of those families could have come from Baltimore. But in a stark demonstration of just how sensitive the issue is, Madden found out quickly that the idea of helping poor people move to the suburbs, even for work, would go nowhere in the legislature.
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NEWS
November 3, 1994
Republican Roscoe G. Bartlett's stand on some issues of the 1994 6th District congressional race.* Crime: Stiffer sentences for violent criminals. Make inmates serve entire sentences. Reduce crime by getting repeat criminals off the street. Remove appeals on death penalty cases.* Health care reform: Reform proposals must encourage competition and make consumers careful shoppers. Get away from third-party payer system. Address problem of losing benefits when people switch jobs. Have employee, not employer, own coverage.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1999
Without job training or a car, Vonzella Riggs struggled for two years to find a stable job in East Baltimore, where she lives."I could never look for work in the counties, because I didn't have any way of getting there," she said.A report released today says thousands in Baltimore share a similar unemployment trap.More than a third of all entry-level jobs in the Baltimore region can't be reached by public transportation, a daunting hurdle for people trying to move off welfare and into the work force, says the study by the Citizens Planning and Housing Association.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1998
As Howard County's welfare caseload continues to dwindle, social service officials are stepping up efforts to keep people off welfare through a number of job training and mentor programs.Later this year, Howard's Department of Social Services will enact the second phase of its welfare reform initiative by offering on-the-job training classes designed to take former welfare recipients to a higher level and help them earn salary increases and promotions.Officials hope to build on the success of current initiatives such as the welfare avoidance grant program, a state effort to move people toward financial independence.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | September 10, 1992
JONESBORO, Ga. -- Attempting to show that he is a "different kind of Democrat," Bill Clinton has outlined his plan to overhaul the nation's welfare system and stop the steady rise in taxes that pay for it.The core of his program would provide welfare recipients with education, training, child care and transportation for two years, then send them to work in the private sector or community service. The plan includes an earned income tax credit for those with children.The proposal seems aimed as much at middle-class suburban voters key to this year's election as much as at welfare recipients.
NEWS
By Stephen E. Winn | December 5, 1994
DURING THIS YEAR'S election campaign, House Republicans spent a great deal of time focusing on such juicy targets as crime, congressional corruption, middle-class worries and the many failings of the Clinton administration.But to hear Newt Gingrich and some of his sidekicks talk now, the election was actually a referendum on demolishing the welfare system and finally putting those shiftless poor people to work.Nothing is easier to denounce than the current welfare system, which everyone acknowledges has serious problems but few people even begin to understand.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | December 2, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A presidential task force is expected to recommend soon a two-year limit on welfare benefits and a last-resort promise of federally funded employment, administration officials and analysts said yesterday. The recommendations would mark a major shift on welfare reform.The policy recommendations would place new emphasis on job-placement services instead of training for employment, which was the focus of a 1988 reform program formulated in part by President Clinton, who was governor of Arkansas at the time.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1998
Continuing a trend that has amazed lawmakers and bureaucrats, Maryland's welfare rolls have dropped to their lowest level in nearly three decades.The number of people receiving state welfare benefits has decreased by more than 41 percent since 1995 -- from roughly 228,000 to just over 133,000 as of January, according to figures from the Department of Human Resources. That is the lowest figure since 1970.In the past year, the welfare caseload has dropped by roughly 44,000 people, or 25 percent, defying more conservative official projections.
NEWS
By RUTH CONNIFF | December 26, 1993
Madison, Wisconsin. -- Wisconsin's Republican Gov. Tommy Thompson beat Bill Clinton to the punch this month when he signed a bill to abolish welfare. This new ''Work Not Welfare'' law puts into practice Mr. Clinton's campaign promise to limit welfare benefits to two years, and goes even further: Wisconsin will scrap Aid to Families with Dependent Children entirely by 1999.But what will happen to the poor when there is no more safety net? The truth is, no one knows. That hasn't slowed Governor Thompson, who vetoed provisions for job creation and health care for the poor once AFDC is abolished.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1998
As Howard County's welfare caseload continues to dwindle, social service officials are stepping up efforts to keep people off welfare through a number of job training and mentor programs.Later this year, Howard's Department of Social Services will enact the second phase of its welfare reform initiative by offering on-the-job training classes designed to take former welfare recipients to a higher level and help them earn salary increases and promotions.Officials hope to build on the success of current initiatives such as the welfare avoidance grant program, a state effort to move people toward financial independence.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1998
Continuing a trend that has amazed lawmakers and bureaucrats, Maryland's welfare rolls have dropped to their lowest level in nearly three decades.The number of people receiving state welfare benefits has decreased by more than 41 percent since 1995 -- from roughly 228,000 to just over 133,000 as of January, according to figures from the Department of Human Resources. That is the lowest figure since 1970.In the past year, the welfare caseload has dropped by roughly 44,000 people, or 25 percent, defying more conservative official projections.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | September 7, 1996
PANAMA CITY, Fla. -- From an adoring audience of black Baptists in Orlando to an enthusiastic crowd that breached the conservative sea walls of Panama City in the Florida panhandle, President Clinton celebrated encouraging economic news yesterday as he completed a two-day offensive in the Sunshine State.On a day that the nation's unemployment rate fell to 5.1 percent of the work force, Clinton declared, "This country is moving in the right direction. We're on the right track for the 21st century."
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1996
Anne Arundel County's welfare rolls have shrunk at more than twice the pace of those in the rest of Maryland since the county Department of Social Services started a job-search program in September, welfare officials say.Over the past five months, the number of Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) recipients fell 8 percent, to 8,304 from 9,023 in Arundel, while those in Maryland's other counties and Baltimore dropped 3.6 percent.The Up Front Jobs Search program, the only one of its kind in the state, steers people away from public assistance and toward jobs.
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | February 11, 1995
The new Republican majority in Congress is pledging to do this year what it refused to allow President Clinton to accomplish last year: End Welfare as We Know It.Monday the House will begin marking up the GOP welfare reform proposal in the Ways and Means Subcommittee on Human Resources, chaired by Rep. E. Clay Shaw, R-Fla.Mr. Shaw's bill would end individual entitlement to cash benefits from the federal government and replace it with block grants to the states, which could use the money however they saw fit. It would limit benefits to two years, ban extra benefits for women who had additional children while on welfare and deny assistance to unmarried teen-age mothers and to most immigrants.
NEWS
By Dan Lynch | December 12, 1994
Albany, N.Y. -- THE REPUBLICANS who now control Congress have offered up their get-tough welfare plan: No welfare for unwed mothers under 18; a five-year lifetime limit on collecting welfare benefits.A crowd of moderate Democrats who call themselves the Progressive Policy Institute then came up with a plan that calls for, among other things, giving unwed teen-age mothers welfare benefits only if they stay in school or agree to job training.Clearly, both parties have been reading the polls -- not to mention the election results.
NEWS
By Dan Lynch | December 12, 1994
Albany, N.Y. -- THE REPUBLICANS who now control Congress have offered up their get-tough welfare plan: No welfare for unwed mothers under 18; a five-year lifetime limit on collecting welfare benefits.A crowd of moderate Democrats who call themselves the Progressive Policy Institute then came up with a plan that calls for, among other things, giving unwed teen-age mothers welfare benefits only if they stay in school or agree to job training.Clearly, both parties have been reading the polls -- not to mention the election results.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1999
Without job training or a car, Vonzella Riggs struggled for two years to find a stable job in East Baltimore, where she lives."I could never look for work in the counties, because I didn't have any way of getting there," she said.A report released today says thousands in Baltimore share a similar unemployment trap.More than a third of all entry-level jobs in the Baltimore region can't be reached by public transportation, a daunting hurdle for people trying to move off welfare and into the work force, says the study by the Citizens Planning and Housing Association.
NEWS
By Stephen E. Winn | December 5, 1994
DURING THIS YEAR'S election campaign, House Republicans spent a great deal of time focusing on such juicy targets as crime, congressional corruption, middle-class worries and the many failings of the Clinton administration.But to hear Newt Gingrich and some of his sidekicks talk now, the election was actually a referendum on demolishing the welfare system and finally putting those shiftless poor people to work.Nothing is easier to denounce than the current welfare system, which everyone acknowledges has serious problems but few people even begin to understand.
NEWS
November 3, 1994
Republican Roscoe G. Bartlett's stand on some issues of the 1994 6th District congressional race.* Crime: Stiffer sentences for violent criminals. Make inmates serve entire sentences. Reduce crime by getting repeat criminals off the street. Remove appeals on death penalty cases.* Health care reform: Reform proposals must encourage competition and make consumers careful shoppers. Get away from third-party payer system. Address problem of losing benefits when people switch jobs. Have employee, not employer, own coverage.
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