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By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 22, 1991
MARKETHILL, Northern Ireland -- Barbara Little watched the bomb go off from the hill on Mowan Road. "It was a huge fireball," she said of the blast that made this little town a little bit smaller.It was an Irish Republican Army bomb, 1,000 pounds of homemade explosive packed into a blue Toyota parked in front of the headquarters of the Royal Ulster Constabulary.A telephoned warning was received. Everybody nearby was evacuated, including Mrs. Little and her two children. There was no time to do anything about the 900 sheep in pens beside the police station.
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NEWS
By Bill Glauber, and Bill Glauber,,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 6, 1999
BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- Shona Kendrick figures she has a sure-fire way to cash in on a peace dividend and lure more tourists to the British province.Come next spring, it's all aboard Titanic tours: day trips and six-day jaunts taking in the Titanic sights, sounds and history in and around this old port city, where the ill-fated ocean liner was built.This journey of shattered dreams somehow symbolizes the unsinkable nature of Northern Ireland's tourist industry, which is picking itself up and trying to show the world that the British province is a great place for a vacation.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | February 22, 1995
If Fort McHenry is allowed to fall, "The Star Spangled Banner" will need a new stanza.Don't look now, but city pupil scores on state tests are going up. Maybe they're doing something right.Ireland and Britain agree! Now they better find out if the people of Northern Ireland do.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 3, 1999
BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- Decades of bloodshed and division gave way to ceremony and history yesterday as Northern Ireland's newly empowered Cabinet met for the first time.The ministers immediately began the arduous task of creating local government and cementing peace in the British province. From reshaping society to restoring the economy -- everything but taxation, criminal justice and security -- local politicians now are in charge of a land where majority Protestants and minority Roman Catholics have struggled over civil rights and national identity.
NEWS
September 17, 1995
From the attention that the Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams receives in this country, readers might be excused for thinking that a multi-party reconciliation in Northern Ireland would be principally a negotiation between Sinn Fein, the political arm of the IRA, and the British government.Any such settlement would be at heart an agreement between the Unionist Party (representing the Protestant majority that wants to remain British) and the Irish Republic's government in Dublin. They speak for most of the people on their island.
NEWS
November 17, 1995
THE REFERENDUM in the Irish Republic on Nov. 24, to amend the constitution to provide for legal divorce and remarriage, may mark a significant step from a Catholic to a nonsectarian state. The momentum for passage comes from changes that have already occurred within Irish society.A similar attempt nine years ago backfired. But now some 75,000 marriages are believed to have broken down, a legal framework for property rights in separation has been legislated and the Catholic Church, which claims some 95 percent of the people as adherents and opposes the change, has been undermined by a few spectacular scandals involving priests.
NEWS
February 13, 1996
THE IRA BOMB in the City of London on Friday reminded all people in Northern Ireland how welcome the cease-fire of the past 17 months has been. It brought tranquillity, created hope, showed what investment and tourism lie in store and clearly brought economic development across the border in the Irish Republic.In restarting terrorism -- so comparable to atrocities at Oklahoma City and the New York World Trade Center -- the IRA was sending a message. It was that Britain should get on with all-party talks and not add preconditions such as the destruction of illegal weapons.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 3, 1999
BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- Decades of bloodshed and division gave way to ceremony and history yesterday as Northern Ireland's newly empowered Cabinet met for the first time.The ministers immediately began the arduous task of creating local government and cementing peace in the British province. From reshaping society to restoring the economy -- everything but taxation, criminal justice and security -- local politicians now are in charge of a land where majority Protestants and minority Roman Catholics have struggled over civil rights and national identity.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | April 1, 1991
LONDON -- The people of Northern Ireland were urged yesterday to "spew out the men and women of violence" as three Roman Catholic victims of the province's sectarian violence were buried and the politicians prepared for all-party peace talks.The victims -- two teen-age girls and a man in his 20s -- were shot in a candy store by a hooded gunman Thursday night in Craigavon, Northern Ireland. The Protestant Action Force, which police believe may have been conducting a reign of terror for the past 15 months, said it carried out the slayings.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 14, 1994
BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- Hope for peace in Northern Ireland took a giant stride ahead yesterday as Protestant gunmen responded to the 6-week-old cease-fire of the Irish Republican Army by declaring their own cease-fire.The Protestant paramilitary groups pledged to "universally cease all operational hostilities" as of midnight yesterday. The duration of the cease-fire, a communique said, "will be completely dependent" upon how long the IRA cease-fire lasted.A statement was read by a well-known figure among Protestant paramilitaries, Augustus "Gusty" Spence, who was credited with founding the modern-day Ulster Volunteer Force in the 1960s.
NEWS
February 13, 1996
THE IRA BOMB in the City of London on Friday reminded all people in Northern Ireland how welcome the cease-fire of the past 17 months has been. It brought tranquillity, created hope, showed what investment and tourism lie in store and clearly brought economic development across the border in the Irish Republic.In restarting terrorism -- so comparable to atrocities at Oklahoma City and the New York World Trade Center -- the IRA was sending a message. It was that Britain should get on with all-party talks and not add preconditions such as the destruction of illegal weapons.
NEWS
November 17, 1995
THE REFERENDUM in the Irish Republic on Nov. 24, to amend the constitution to provide for legal divorce and remarriage, may mark a significant step from a Catholic to a nonsectarian state. The momentum for passage comes from changes that have already occurred within Irish society.A similar attempt nine years ago backfired. But now some 75,000 marriages are believed to have broken down, a legal framework for property rights in separation has been legislated and the Catholic Church, which claims some 95 percent of the people as adherents and opposes the change, has been undermined by a few spectacular scandals involving priests.
NEWS
September 17, 1995
From the attention that the Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams receives in this country, readers might be excused for thinking that a multi-party reconciliation in Northern Ireland would be principally a negotiation between Sinn Fein, the political arm of the IRA, and the British government.Any such settlement would be at heart an agreement between the Unionist Party (representing the Protestant majority that wants to remain British) and the Irish Republic's government in Dublin. They speak for most of the people on their island.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | February 22, 1995
If Fort McHenry is allowed to fall, "The Star Spangled Banner" will need a new stanza.Don't look now, but city pupil scores on state tests are going up. Maybe they're doing something right.Ireland and Britain agree! Now they better find out if the people of Northern Ireland do.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 14, 1994
BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- Hope for peace in Northern Ireland took a giant stride ahead yesterday as Protestant gunmen responded to the 6-week-old cease-fire of the Irish Republican Army by declaring their own cease-fire.The Protestant paramilitary groups pledged to "universally cease all operational hostilities" as of midnight yesterday. The duration of the cease-fire, a communique said, "will be completely dependent" upon how long the IRA cease-fire lasted.A statement was read by a well-known figure among Protestant paramilitaries, Augustus "Gusty" Spence, who was credited with founding the modern-day Ulster Volunteer Force in the 1960s.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 24, 1991
BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- The black taxis on the Falls and Shankill roads began their lives 20 years ago as a temporary expedient and they are still rattling along.They reflect the way life is arranged here. They are among the instruments that maintain the separation of the people of Northern Ireland.The taxis travel up the Falls about four miles, then back down again. On the Shankill they run about the same distance, then back down again. The empty stretch of street that connects the Falls and Shankill, Lanark Way, has a spiked iron gate that closes each night.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber, and Bill Glauber,,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 6, 1999
BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- Shona Kendrick figures she has a sure-fire way to cash in on a peace dividend and lure more tourists to the British province.Come next spring, it's all aboard Titanic tours: day trips and six-day jaunts taking in the Titanic sights, sounds and history in and around this old port city, where the ill-fated ocean liner was built.This journey of shattered dreams somehow symbolizes the unsinkable nature of Northern Ireland's tourist industry, which is picking itself up and trying to show the world that the British province is a great place for a vacation.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 24, 1991
BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- The black taxis on the Falls and Shankill roads began their lives 20 years ago as a temporary expedient and they are still rattling along.They reflect the way life is arranged here. They are among the instruments that maintain the separation of the people of Northern Ireland.The taxis travel up the Falls about four miles, then back down again. On the Shankill they run about the same distance, then back down again. The empty stretch of street that connects the Falls and Shankill, Lanark Way, has a spiked iron gate that closes each night.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 22, 1991
MARKETHILL, Northern Ireland -- Barbara Little watched the bomb go off from the hill on Mowan Road. "It was a huge fireball," she said of the blast that made this little town a little bit smaller.It was an Irish Republican Army bomb, 1,000 pounds of homemade explosive packed into a blue Toyota parked in front of the headquarters of the Royal Ulster Constabulary.A telephoned warning was received. Everybody nearby was evacuated, including Mrs. Little and her two children. There was no time to do anything about the 900 sheep in pens beside the police station.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | April 1, 1991
LONDON -- The people of Northern Ireland were urged yesterday to "spew out the men and women of violence" as three Roman Catholic victims of the province's sectarian violence were buried and the politicians prepared for all-party peace talks.The victims -- two teen-age girls and a man in his 20s -- were shot in a candy store by a hooded gunman Thursday night in Craigavon, Northern Ireland. The Protestant Action Force, which police believe may have been conducting a reign of terror for the past 15 months, said it carried out the slayings.
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