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People Mover

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NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 1, 1998
THE MAYOR of Baltimore is bullish on the people mover idea. Nice to see the mayor bullish on something. Bullish is not the word we associate with the mayor. His nature tends more toward the ursine. But he is bullish on the people mover - $210 million for an overhead monorail, a slab of concrete held up by concrete pilings across the city's fabulous downtown, past the Inner Harbor, through Fells Point, all the way to Canton.It should be noted, before we go any further, that if not for the Big John Hotel at Inner Harbor East, the one being developed by the mayor's political sugar daddy, then we wouldn't be hearing about the people mover much.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 12, 1998
Transit loop in city would ride circles around people moverOf the four people-mover systems mentioned in "Kicking the tires of a people mover" (May 31), one has already shut down for lack of ridership. Another, in Detroit, has an $8 million per year operating cost for a system equal in length to the one proposed for Baltimore.The one success, Miami, does not show the value of people movers so much as the value of planning an integrated public transportation system that takes people where they want to go.Baltimore has three major modes of public transportation: bus, Metro and light rail.
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NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1998
The city plans to spend about $1 million this year to see if a futuristic transit system of elevated electrical cars -- known as a "people mover" -- would work in downtown Baltimore.George G. Balog, Baltimore's public works director, said a feasibility study of the people mover first proposed three decades ago -- and now estimated to cost $210 million -- is one of 51 preliminary design projects to be funded by the city this year.But most of the design projects are on a much smaller scale than the people mover and involve studies that will cost $100,000 to $500,000, he said.
NEWS
June 9, 1998
Juggling work, home should not be viewed as only a woman 0) thingSusan Reimer's column ("The Juggling Act," June 3) serves to perpetuate our society's image of the working mother.While I greatly admire the women depicted in the piece, Ms. Reimer does them and all women a disservice by refusing to question the status quo: that it is still a woman's responsibility to be the primary caregiver of her and her husband's children.Where are the men in these pictures? Ms. Reimer sometimes mentions the husbands, but only states their names and occupations, occasionally offering, "Her husband is extremely helpful, but . . ."
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | March 9, 1998
City leaders are busy courting Congress for funds for a monorail that would run from Camden Station to Canton, even though some residents of Baltimore's historic waterfront neighborhoods are upset about the proposal.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke has asked Congress to spend $1.5 million on a study of his proposed "people mover" -- computerized electrical cars that would run on both sides of a rail elevated about 15 feet and supported by single poles.Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, a Baltimore Democrat, is spearheading the effort to get congressional approval for the estimated $200 million to build the people mover -- a cost roughly equal to that of the new Ravens stadium.
NEWS
October 14, 1997
THE IDEA OF an elevated people-mover to transport passengers within the Inner Harbor area is not new to Baltimoreans. The first serious proposal came more than 20 years ago from then-City Council President Walter S. Orlinsky. And this year, after winning the competition to build a convention hotel, bakery mogul John Paterakis Sr. said he envisioned a people-mover that could transport up to 2,000 people an hour in enclosed cars suspended by cables over the water.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke has his own vision of this particular transportation mode.
NEWS
March 11, 1998
BEFORE MAYOR Kurt L. Schmoke gets too excited about a $200 million "people mover" for the Inner Harbor, he should spend a few cents calling Florida. Tampa Mayor Dick Greco announced last week he is thinking of scrapping his city's 13-year-old elevated people mover, which was built to ferry expected hordes of tourists between downtown and the Harbour Island shopping and restaurant district."
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1998
Baltimore's "people mover" project -- a proposed three-mile monorail from Camden Station to Canton -- has received preliminary funding from Congress, allowing studies and designs proceed.The authorization is included in $28 million that will be granted directly to the city through the recently passed six-year federal transportation bill. Among the transportation projects authorized are $13.2 million to replace city traffic signals and $10.9 million for road improvements in the city's Empowerment Zone.
NEWS
By Wally Orlinsky | March 22, 1998
WITH all of the current discussion about building a "people mover" in Baltimore, there's been a renewed interest in mass transit ideas I put forth 17 years ago. But, while it is flattering to hear people use my name when ideas such as the people mover arise, they often forget the context in which I was working years ago.Now, I would dearly love to see the Baltimore area have a modern integrated public transportation system. One that would be so convenient to use that many people would use it because it made their everyday lives easier.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts | August 2, 1991
Visitors to Baltimore's new Camden Yards ballpark would be able to travel from the stadium to the Inner Harbor in 90 seconds by hopping aboard a futuristic people mover, if the Maryland Stadium Authority accepts a development proposal submitted last month.VSL Corp., a California-based engineering and construction company affiliated with the giant Bouygues Group of France, has offered to finance, build and operate a $17 million, 3,700-foot-long monorail line that would connect Harborplace, the stadium and a 3,000-space stadium parking lot south of Hamburg Street.
NEWS
June 6, 1998
City's Reservoir Hill bounds with charm as it springs to lifeAll of us who live in Reservoir Hill want to thank you for your editorial ("Druid Hill Park's comeback," May 26).It was a most positive piece and filled with encouragement. The many vacant homes here are now being bought and restored to their original luster.We are busy with Project HOPE (Housing and Outreach through Presbyterian Enterprises), a revitalization plan for Reservoir Hill. The Reservoir Hill Improvement Council helps to provide insight into the community and listens to all of our opinions.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 1, 1998
THE MAYOR of Baltimore is bullish on the people mover idea. Nice to see the mayor bullish on something. Bullish is not the word we associate with the mayor. His nature tends more toward the ursine. But he is bullish on the people mover - $210 million for an overhead monorail, a slab of concrete held up by concrete pilings across the city's fabulous downtown, past the Inner Harbor, through Fells Point, all the way to Canton.It should be noted, before we go any further, that if not for the Big John Hotel at Inner Harbor East, the one being developed by the mayor's political sugar daddy, then we wouldn't be hearing about the people mover much.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | May 31, 1998
Across the country, as urban areas run out of parking spaces and their downtowns become gridlocked, a handful of cities are turning to driverless, electric cars on elevated tracks that snake between skyscrapers delivering workers to their jobs, tourists to hot spots and conventioneers to hotels.Now, Baltimore is eyeing the possibility of building such a "people mover."It's no wonder. Traffic is considered one of the city's greatest obstacles to economic expansion. The most recent study shows the downtown core is short 3,600 parking spaces.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1998
Baltimore's "people mover" project -- a proposed three-mile monorail from Camden Station to Canton -- has received preliminary funding from Congress, allowing studies and designs proceed.The authorization is included in $28 million that will be granted directly to the city through the recently passed six-year federal transportation bill. Among the transportation projects authorized are $13.2 million to replace city traffic signals and $10.9 million for road improvements in the city's Empowerment Zone.
NEWS
By Wally Orlinsky | March 22, 1998
WITH all of the current discussion about building a "people mover" in Baltimore, there's been a renewed interest in mass transit ideas I put forth 17 years ago. But, while it is flattering to hear people use my name when ideas such as the people mover arise, they often forget the context in which I was working years ago.Now, I would dearly love to see the Baltimore area have a modern integrated public transportation system. One that would be so convenient to use that many people would use it because it made their everyday lives easier.
NEWS
March 11, 1998
BEFORE MAYOR Kurt L. Schmoke gets too excited about a $200 million "people mover" for the Inner Harbor, he should spend a few cents calling Florida. Tampa Mayor Dick Greco announced last week he is thinking of scrapping his city's 13-year-old elevated people mover, which was built to ferry expected hordes of tourists between downtown and the Harbour Island shopping and restaurant district."
NEWS
June 12, 1998
Transit loop in city would ride circles around people moverOf the four people-mover systems mentioned in "Kicking the tires of a people mover" (May 31), one has already shut down for lack of ridership. Another, in Detroit, has an $8 million per year operating cost for a system equal in length to the one proposed for Baltimore.The one success, Miami, does not show the value of people movers so much as the value of planning an integrated public transportation system that takes people where they want to go.Baltimore has three major modes of public transportation: bus, Metro and light rail.
NEWS
June 6, 1998
City's Reservoir Hill bounds with charm as it springs to lifeAll of us who live in Reservoir Hill want to thank you for your editorial ("Druid Hill Park's comeback," May 26).It was a most positive piece and filled with encouragement. The many vacant homes here are now being bought and restored to their original luster.We are busy with Project HOPE (Housing and Outreach through Presbyterian Enterprises), a revitalization plan for Reservoir Hill. The Reservoir Hill Improvement Council helps to provide insight into the community and listens to all of our opinions.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | March 9, 1998
City leaders are busy courting Congress for funds for a monorail that would run from Camden Station to Canton, even though some residents of Baltimore's historic waterfront neighborhoods are upset about the proposal.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke has asked Congress to spend $1.5 million on a study of his proposed "people mover" -- computerized electrical cars that would run on both sides of a rail elevated about 15 feet and supported by single poles.Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, a Baltimore Democrat, is spearheading the effort to get congressional approval for the estimated $200 million to build the people mover -- a cost roughly equal to that of the new Ravens stadium.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1998
The city plans to spend about $1 million this year to see if a futuristic transit system of elevated electrical cars -- known as a "people mover" -- would work in downtown Baltimore.George G. Balog, Baltimore's public works director, said a feasibility study of the people mover first proposed three decades ago -- and now estimated to cost $210 million -- is one of 51 preliminary design projects to be funded by the city this year.But most of the design projects are on a much smaller scale than the people mover and involve studies that will cost $100,000 to $500,000, he said.
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