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By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 2, 1997
The personal computer industry is hoping to celebrate Christmas early this year. At the center of the celebration under the virtual Christmas tree is a drab little box called Pentium II.A 3-inch-by-5-inch device about the size of a very fat chocolate bar, Pentium II is poised to become the Tickle Me Elmo of cyberspace seven months from now as computer stores attempt to log a better season than last year's semi-dud.In an industry of superlatives, Pentium II enters the marketplace as the most superlative yet, with chip speeds blazing well above today's 200 megahertz high-end Pentium MMX standard and with built-in features that let it perform stunning video displays and other seeming wonders.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 1, 2003
I run Windows 98 on a 5-year-old custom-built Pentium II PC. My problem: I'm upgrading to Windows XP Home Edition and have questions about backing up my files. I have all the disks for peripherals, so if I lose any of them, I'm not too worried. My biggest concern is how to back up my audio and video files. The CD burner only does one format (.wav) as far as I know, and copying my collection in that format would take too many disks and too much time. There's got to be a better way! It looks as if you weren't informed about the ins and outs of CD-burning software when you took on that Pentium II. Those .wav files are huge because they are totally uncompressed, so one needs to use the MP3 sound-file-compression scheme to boil them down to far smaller files suitable for backing up on CD-Rs using a burner.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Zeiler and Dave Zeiler,SUN STAFF | April 27, 1998
What's in a name? In the case of Apple's new G3 Power Macs, it's the core of an aggressive marketing strategy and - more crucially - optimism for the future of the Mac.G3 is the name of the CUcentral processing unit) that powers the latest generation of Macs. Intel's much-ballyhooed Pentium and Pentium II CPUs power most Windows-based PCs. Apple's recnet advertising campaign brags that the G3 chip fla-tout dusts the Pentium II.Both of Apple's ads in the current campaign belittle Intel's flagship product.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | May 24, 1999
No matter what computer you buy today, you'll always have second thoughts about it."If I'd only waited a couple of months," you'll say, "I could have gotten a lot more for a lot less money."And you'll be right -- there's always a better deal just around the corner. So, when I make my semiannual "what-PC-to-buy" recommendations as the summer and winter solstices approach, I try to balance price, performance and longevity.The current state of affairs illustrates Moore's Law, named after Gordon Moore, a founder of the Intel Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JAMES COATES and JAMES COATES,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 14, 1998
A lot of the programs I'm using for the Internet keep sending stuff to my Recycle Bin, things like "temp" files, etc. This results in memory problems. I would like to prevent items from going to the bin. Is it possible to change the settings which control this?A bloated Recycle Bin isn't a memory problem, but rather a storage problem. However, I feel your pain and I have your answer.If you highlight the Recycle Bin icon and right-click the mouse, you'll get a menu that includes the option of deleting files rather than shunting them to the Recycle Bin, which exists as a safety net in case you delete some essential driver or library or some other important file.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 1, 2003
I run Windows 98 on a 5-year-old custom-built Pentium II PC. My problem: I'm upgrading to Windows XP Home Edition and have questions about backing up my files. I have all the disks for peripherals, so if I lose any of them, I'm not too worried. My biggest concern is how to back up my audio and video files. The CD burner only does one format (.wav) as far as I know, and copying my collection in that format would take too many disks and too much time. There's got to be a better way! It looks as if you weren't informed about the ins and outs of CD-burning software when you took on that Pentium II. Those .wav files are huge because they are totally uncompressed, so one needs to use the MP3 sound-file-compression scheme to boil them down to far smaller files suitable for backing up on CD-Rs using a burner.
BUSINESS
By Stephen Manes and Stephen Manes,New York Times News Service | March 2, 1998
THE DAY of the $800 brand-name desktop computer has arrived, if you are willing to overlook the extra $200 for a cheap monitor. That sounds great, but $500 (sans monitor) machines are likely to appear by the end of the year. So what to do?The pace of change in the computer business has always made buying decisions tricky, but the penalty for guessing wrong has dropped. And now that the difference between the bottom of the line and the top is about $1,200, you can buy two cheapies for the price of a luxury model.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | May 24, 1999
No matter what computer you buy today, you'll always have second thoughts about it."If I'd only waited a couple of months," you'll say, "I could have gotten a lot more for a lot less money."And you'll be right -- there's always a better deal just around the corner. So, when I make my semiannual "what-PC-to-buy" recommendations as the summer and winter solstices approach, I try to balance price, performance and longevity.The current state of affairs illustrates Moore's Law, named after Gordon Moore, a founder of the Intel Corp.
BUSINESS
By Michael Himowitz | June 1, 1997
IN AN IDEAL WORLD, we'd all like to be able to buy the fastest computer, with the latest processor, gobs of memory and all kinds of multimedia goodies. Unfortunately, reality intrudes in the form of limited budgets, and we're often forced to make compromises.Which brings me around to a question I often get from shoppers confused by the array of systems they see on showroom floors: If I can afford one or the other, should I buy a computer with a slower processor and more memory, or a faster computer with less memory?
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | April 20, 1998
A year ago, if you'd asked me whether a $1,000 PC was a good buy, I'd have said, "No way."Today it's a different story. In fact, for a grand (give or take a couple of hundred bucks), you can get a pretty decent computer -- a machine that will handle today's chores and still provide adequate performance a few years down the road.What's responsible for the change? As usual, it's technology, competition and market forces.Manufacturers are turning out faster low-end processors and complex integrated circuits that pack more features into fewer chips.
ENTERTAINMENT
By DWIGHT SILVERMAN and DWIGHT SILVERMAN,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | March 15, 1999
It seems whenever Intel Corp. begins shipping a new processor, it comes with an unwanted feature -- controversy.When Intel's low-cost entry, the Celeron, was introduced, critics complained about its lack of onboard memory, or cache. And remember the floating-point math bug in the original Pentium? The Pentium Pro and Pentium II chips had similar problems.Now we have the Pentium III, with its built-in serial number that privacy groups say amounts to "Big Brother Inside." And there's the fact that the Pentium III is actually a Pentium II, with 70 extra software commands to boost multimedia performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JAMES COATES and JAMES COATES,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 14, 1998
A lot of the programs I'm using for the Internet keep sending stuff to my Recycle Bin, things like "temp" files, etc. This results in memory problems. I would like to prevent items from going to the bin. Is it possible to change the settings which control this?A bloated Recycle Bin isn't a memory problem, but rather a storage problem. However, I feel your pain and I have your answer.If you highlight the Recycle Bin icon and right-click the mouse, you'll get a menu that includes the option of deleting files rather than shunting them to the Recycle Bin, which exists as a safety net in case you delete some essential driver or library or some other important file.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | November 23, 1998
Let's get right down to it. The holiday shopping season has started, and for millions of families, that means time to buy a new computer.There has never been a greater selection - from low-end systems in the $600 range to multimedia barn-burners that will set you back almost three grand.When friends ask me for a recommendation, I generally take the middle road - a computer with enough horsepower to do your work and keep the kids entertained for a couple of years, but with a price tag that won't break the bank.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Zeiler and Dave Zeiler,SUN STAFF | April 27, 1998
What's in a name? In the case of Apple's new G3 Power Macs, it's the core of an aggressive marketing strategy and - more crucially - optimism for the future of the Mac.G3 is the name of the CUcentral processing unit) that powers the latest generation of Macs. Intel's much-ballyhooed Pentium and Pentium II CPUs power most Windows-based PCs. Apple's recnet advertising campaign brags that the G3 chip fla-tout dusts the Pentium II.Both of Apple's ads in the current campaign belittle Intel's flagship product.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | April 20, 1998
A year ago, if you'd asked me whether a $1,000 PC was a good buy, I'd have said, "No way."Today it's a different story. In fact, for a grand (give or take a couple of hundred bucks), you can get a pretty decent computer -- a machine that will handle today's chores and still provide adequate performance a few years down the road.What's responsible for the change? As usual, it's technology, competition and market forces.Manufacturers are turning out faster low-end processors and complex integrated circuits that pack more features into fewer chips.
BUSINESS
By Stephen Manes and Stephen Manes,New York Times News Service | March 2, 1998
THE DAY of the $800 brand-name desktop computer has arrived, if you are willing to overlook the extra $200 for a cheap monitor. That sounds great, but $500 (sans monitor) machines are likely to appear by the end of the year. So what to do?The pace of change in the computer business has always made buying decisions tricky, but the penalty for guessing wrong has dropped. And now that the difference between the bottom of the line and the top is about $1,200, you can buy two cheapies for the price of a luxury model.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | November 23, 1998
Let's get right down to it. The holiday shopping season has started, and for millions of families, that means time to buy a new computer.There has never been a greater selection - from low-end systems in the $600 range to multimedia barn-burners that will set you back almost three grand.When friends ask me for a recommendation, I generally take the middle road - a computer with enough horsepower to do your work and keep the kids entertained for a couple of years, but with a price tag that won't break the bank.
ENTERTAINMENT
By DWIGHT SILVERMAN and DWIGHT SILVERMAN,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | March 15, 1999
It seems whenever Intel Corp. begins shipping a new processor, it comes with an unwanted feature -- controversy.When Intel's low-cost entry, the Celeron, was introduced, critics complained about its lack of onboard memory, or cache. And remember the floating-point math bug in the original Pentium? The Pentium Pro and Pentium II chips had similar problems.Now we have the Pentium III, with its built-in serial number that privacy groups say amounts to "Big Brother Inside." And there's the fact that the Pentium III is actually a Pentium II, with 70 extra software commands to boost multimedia performance.
BUSINESS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 2, 1997
The personal computer industry is hoping to celebrate Christmas early this year. At the center of the celebration under the virtual Christmas tree is a drab little box called Pentium II.A 3-inch-by-5-inch device about the size of a very fat chocolate bar, Pentium II is poised to become the Tickle Me Elmo of cyberspace seven months from now as computer stores attempt to log a better season than last year's semi-dud.In an industry of superlatives, Pentium II enters the marketplace as the most superlative yet, with chip speeds blazing well above today's 200 megahertz high-end Pentium MMX standard and with built-in features that let it perform stunning video displays and other seeming wonders.
BUSINESS
By Michael Himowitz | June 1, 1997
IN AN IDEAL WORLD, we'd all like to be able to buy the fastest computer, with the latest processor, gobs of memory and all kinds of multimedia goodies. Unfortunately, reality intrudes in the form of limited budgets, and we're often forced to make compromises.Which brings me around to a question I often get from shoppers confused by the array of systems they see on showroom floors: If I can afford one or the other, should I buy a computer with a slower processor and more memory, or a faster computer with less memory?
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