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Pentium Chip

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By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | January 9, 1997
SAN FRANCISCO -- Personal computers powered by Intel Corp.'s new Pentium chip began hitting store shelves yesterday, an event that is expected to revive interest in PCs after a gloomy holiday sales season.The new MMX chip will help PCs display video with the clarity of television sets and play audio with the quality of stereo equipment, bringing personal computers closer to becoming multimedia terminals."Based on what we're hearing from retailers, we see demand as very good at least through the first quarter," said Mal Ransom, senior vice president for marketing at Packard Bell NEC Inc.Packard Bell's fourth-quarter sales were flat, compared with the year-earlier period, largely because some buyers were awaiting the new chip, Ransom said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | May 24, 1999
No matter what computer you buy today, you'll always have second thoughts about it."If I'd only waited a couple of months," you'll say, "I could have gotten a lot more for a lot less money."And you'll be right -- there's always a better deal just around the corner. So, when I make my semiannual "what-PC-to-buy" recommendations as the summer and winter solstices approach, I try to balance price, performance and longevity.The current state of affairs illustrates Moore's Law, named after Gordon Moore, a founder of the Intel Corp.
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BUSINESS
June 28, 1994
GM expected to promote WagonerGeneral Motors Corp. plans to announce today the promotion of G. Richard Wagoner Jr., now the chief financial officer and head of worldwide purchasing, to run the company's crucial North American automotive operations, GM officials told the New York Times yesterday.A corporate reshuffling has been expected at GM for weeks. Board members met yesterday in New York to consider the appointment, as well as other management changes requested by John F. Smith Jr., GM's president and chief executive.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | September 7, 1997
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- A new era in portable computing begins tomorrow, with dozens of players taking advantage of an innovative new processor to target one of the fastest-growing segments of the personal computer market.Intel's brand new "Tillamook" portable processor is a 200- or 233-MHz Pentium with MMX chip, the first Intel chip to be built with a so-called "0.25 micron" process.This process allows the production of smaller chips that use less power and generate less heat, making them particularly suitable for use in portables.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Lecky and Andrew Lecky,Tribune Media Services | January 11, 1995
As 1995 begins, the computer industry offers convincing evidence that nobody's perfect and everybody wants to be hip.Intel Corp. is belatedly spending $200 million on the first-ever consumer recall of a computer microprocessor, the Pentium chip. Meanwhile, Microsoft Corp. merits a procrastinator award for a second delay (until August) of its much-publicized Windows 95 software program. It claims there are no real problems and the delay wasn't prompted by the Intel debacle.Television commercials for some straight-laced computer companies lately have become more desperately "Generation X" in nature than ads for blue jeans or corn chips.
BUSINESS
By Steve Auerweck | February 15, 1993
Columbia firm finds a way to make 'gold'A small Columbia software house has found a way to turn lead (and steel and aluminum . . .) into gold.Consolidated Resources Inc. markets a software package called ScrapMaster, created for the Apple Macintosh in 1990, that handles the problems of cash and inventory management in the recycling industry. Now the company's system includes a cash dispenser to provide better accounting and security at recycling centers."The problem our clients have is that money is constantly disappearing," said Joseph Floam, Consolidated's president.
BUSINESS
By Michael Himowitz | June 1, 1997
IN AN IDEAL WORLD, we'd all like to be able to buy the fastest computer, with the latest processor, gobs of memory and all kinds of multimedia goodies. Unfortunately, reality intrudes in the form of limited budgets, and we're often forced to make compromises.Which brings me around to a question I often get from shoppers confused by the array of systems they see on showroom floors: If I can afford one or the other, should I buy a computer with a slower processor and more memory, or a faster computer with less memory?
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser | December 18, 1994
Intel Corp., the world's largest semiconductor maker, was already the butt of jokes on the Internet when International Business Machines Corp. announced last week that it would suspend sales of computers made with Intel's Pentium chip because of a bug affecting mathematical calculations.IBM's action left Intel complaining that Big Blue was exaggerating the seriousness of the flaw, but IBM contended it had found the bug to be more serious than Intel had disclosed. Because it failed to disclose upon discovering it last summer, Intel was in a poor position to wage a credibility war with IBM. Its stock plunged.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | December 16, 1994
Paul McMullin wants to reassure people that "we're not going to have satellites falling on our heads" because Intel Corp.'s Pentium chip has a flaw.Still, the network administrator at the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory said scientists at the high-tech center in Howard County are worried that the glitch could throw off critical calculations -- with potentially serious consequences."
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | December 1, 1994
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks were little changed yesterday as concern about higher interest rates and a drop in Intel Corp. and other technology issues stopped an early rally.Losses in beverage, semiconductor, retail, bank and communications equipment issues offset gains in drug, paper, chemical, machinery and liquor stocks.Although 30-year Treasury bond yields fell to 8.0 percent yesterday from a recent peak of 8.16 percent three weeks ago, they're "not at that point where it's going to drive people away from bonds and back into the equity market," said Dale Tills, manager of institutional equities at Charles Schwab Corp.
BUSINESS
By Michael Himowitz | June 1, 1997
IN AN IDEAL WORLD, we'd all like to be able to buy the fastest computer, with the latest processor, gobs of memory and all kinds of multimedia goodies. Unfortunately, reality intrudes in the form of limited budgets, and we're often forced to make compromises.Which brings me around to a question I often get from shoppers confused by the array of systems they see on showroom floors: If I can afford one or the other, should I buy a computer with a slower processor and more memory, or a faster computer with less memory?
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | January 9, 1997
SAN FRANCISCO -- Personal computers powered by Intel Corp.'s new Pentium chip began hitting store shelves yesterday, an event that is expected to revive interest in PCs after a gloomy holiday sales season.The new MMX chip will help PCs display video with the clarity of television sets and play audio with the quality of stereo equipment, bringing personal computers closer to becoming multimedia terminals."Based on what we're hearing from retailers, we see demand as very good at least through the first quarter," said Mal Ransom, senior vice president for marketing at Packard Bell NEC Inc.Packard Bell's fourth-quarter sales were flat, compared with the year-earlier period, largely because some buyers were awaiting the new chip, Ransom said.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Lecky and Andrew Lecky,Tribune Media Services | January 11, 1995
As 1995 begins, the computer industry offers convincing evidence that nobody's perfect and everybody wants to be hip.Intel Corp. is belatedly spending $200 million on the first-ever consumer recall of a computer microprocessor, the Pentium chip. Meanwhile, Microsoft Corp. merits a procrastinator award for a second delay (until August) of its much-publicized Windows 95 software program. It claims there are no real problems and the delay wasn't prompted by the Intel debacle.Television commercials for some straight-laced computer companies lately have become more desperately "Generation X" in nature than ads for blue jeans or corn chips.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser | December 18, 1994
Intel Corp., the world's largest semiconductor maker, was already the butt of jokes on the Internet when International Business Machines Corp. announced last week that it would suspend sales of computers made with Intel's Pentium chip because of a bug affecting mathematical calculations.IBM's action left Intel complaining that Big Blue was exaggerating the seriousness of the flaw, but IBM contended it had found the bug to be more serious than Intel had disclosed. Because it failed to disclose upon discovering it last summer, Intel was in a poor position to wage a credibility war with IBM. Its stock plunged.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | December 16, 1994
Paul McMullin wants to reassure people that "we're not going to have satellites falling on our heads" because Intel Corp.'s Pentium chip has a flaw.Still, the network administrator at the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory said scientists at the high-tech center in Howard County are worried that the glitch could throw off critical calculations -- with potentially serious consequences."
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | December 1, 1994
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks were little changed yesterday as concern about higher interest rates and a drop in Intel Corp. and other technology issues stopped an early rally.Losses in beverage, semiconductor, retail, bank and communications equipment issues offset gains in drug, paper, chemical, machinery and liquor stocks.Although 30-year Treasury bond yields fell to 8.0 percent yesterday from a recent peak of 8.16 percent three weeks ago, they're "not at that point where it's going to drive people away from bonds and back into the equity market," said Dale Tills, manager of institutional equities at Charles Schwab Corp.
BUSINESS
By Steve Auerweck and Steve Auerweck,Staff Writer | November 22, 1993
A Pentium-based PC fit for James BondNAI Technologies' System Division in Columbia has laid claim to the title of being first on the market with a Pentium-based personal computer that meets the Tempest security standards.The federal standards are designed to prevent the data on a computer from being "broadcast" in ways that can be intercepted and interpreted by enemies. They even cover components like monitors, where faint traces of screen images can linger for hours.The NAI unit's newest product is the XpressStation/4-T.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | May 24, 1999
No matter what computer you buy today, you'll always have second thoughts about it."If I'd only waited a couple of months," you'll say, "I could have gotten a lot more for a lot less money."And you'll be right -- there's always a better deal just around the corner. So, when I make my semiannual "what-PC-to-buy" recommendations as the summer and winter solstices approach, I try to balance price, performance and longevity.The current state of affairs illustrates Moore's Law, named after Gordon Moore, a founder of the Intel Corp.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1994
GM expected to promote WagonerGeneral Motors Corp. plans to announce today the promotion of G. Richard Wagoner Jr., now the chief financial officer and head of worldwide purchasing, to run the company's crucial North American automotive operations, GM officials told the New York Times yesterday.A corporate reshuffling has been expected at GM for weeks. Board members met yesterday in New York to consider the appointment, as well as other management changes requested by John F. Smith Jr., GM's president and chief executive.
BUSINESS
By Steve Auerweck and Steve Auerweck,Staff Writer | November 22, 1993
A Pentium-based PC fit for James BondNAI Technologies' System Division in Columbia has laid claim to the title of being first on the market with a Pentium-based personal computer that meets the Tempest security standards.The federal standards are designed to prevent the data on a computer from being "broadcast" in ways that can be intercepted and interpreted by enemies. They even cover components like monitors, where faint traces of screen images can linger for hours.The NAI unit's newest product is the XpressStation/4-T.
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