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By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writer | December 21, 1994
Stung by bad publicity about its top product and worried by signs of slumping sales, Intel Corp. reversed itself yesterday and agreed to replace defective Pentium computer chips for anyone who asks.The decision probably will cost Intel tens of millions of dollars. But the price of continuing Intel's previous policy of erecting roadblocks for customers seeking free Pentium exchanges would have been higher, financial analysts said.Intel in recent weeks has found itself in a public relations quagmire that experts said will go down in marketing textbooks next to the Exxon Valdez oil spill and the Food Lion tainted-meat case.
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BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz | June 9, 2005
HOW DO you think members of a congregation would feel if their minister stood up one Sunday and announced that he was embracing Satan? No different from the way many Apple customers felt this week when CEO Steve Jobs told the company's most faithful acolytes - the folks who develop its software - that future versions of the Macintosh operating system would run on Intel processors. And with that, he tried to slap a bear hug on Intel's CEO, Paul Otellini. Jobs has, of course, spent years trashing Intel's processors as slow, unwieldy, underperforming pieces of electronic detritus better suited to running a dishwasher than a computer.
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NEWS
December 20, 1994
Giant Intel Corp., which launched a massive consumer advertising campaign several years ago to make its Pentium computer chip a household name, has succeeded -- but not the way it wanted. Recently the chip was found to be defective when used in certain applications. The news flashed across the Internet, the electronic bulletin board used by thousands of researchers around the world, and the company suddenly was besieged with demands to recall this key component in millions of personal computers.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 12, 2004
SANTA CLARA, Calif. - Intel Corp. named President Paul S. Otellini yesterday as its next chief executive officer, for the first time choosing a nonengineer to run the world's largest computer-chip maker. Otellini, a 30-year Intel veteran who made his name overseeing the introduction of the Pentium processor in 1993, will replace Craig R. Barrett in May. Barrett, who expanded Intel beyond personal computers into communications in the 1990s, will step aside as Intel struggles with slowing growth and a record stockpile of unsold chips.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | December 14, 1994
Every year at this time we hear about the many people who become depressed because of stress brought on by the psychological overload of the Christmas holidays.All sorts of factors are said to contribute to this emotional mopiness: troubling memories, eccentric relatives, demanding kids, frenzied shopping and being forced to eat fruitcake.And this season it could be even worse. Tens of thousands of otherwise happy people will find themselves falling into deep gloom or explosive rage.They are among the many who have given in to our national hunger to possess the very latest high-tech doodad that promises to make our lives easier while filling us with joy.This year the hottest doodad is the personal computer.
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz | June 9, 2005
HOW DO you think members of a congregation would feel if their minister stood up one Sunday and announced that he was embracing Satan? No different from the way many Apple customers felt this week when CEO Steve Jobs told the company's most faithful acolytes - the folks who develop its software - that future versions of the Macintosh operating system would run on Intel processors. And with that, he tried to slap a bear hug on Intel's CEO, Paul Otellini. Jobs has, of course, spent years trashing Intel's processors as slow, unwieldy, underperforming pieces of electronic detritus better suited to running a dishwasher than a computer.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | April 13, 1993
SAN FRANCISCO -- Intel Corp. yesterday announced record revenue and earnings for the first quarter of 1993. Strong sales of 386 and 486 microprocessors pushed quarterly revenue at the world's largest computer chip maker to the $2 billion level for the first time in the company's 25-year history.For the quarter that ended March 27, Intel had earnings of $548 million, or $2.48 a share, more than twice its earnings of $184.1 million, or 86 cents a share, in the period a year earlier. Revenue rose 63 percent, to $2.02 billion, from $1.24 billion in 1992.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | November 26, 2001
Buying a computer for the holidays? Here's my advice: Don't sweat it. Today's PCs are astounding bargains. Processing power, memory and hard disk storage have become so cheap that a manufacturer would have to go out of his way to produce a bad computer. A yearlong industry slump and competition for market share have also driven PC prices deeper than ever. Walk into any store, pick one off the shelf, you're likely to wind up with a machine perfectly capable of the word processing, Web browsing, e-mail and financial record-keeping that most of us do with our PCs. That said, it pays to know enough to buy a computer that meets your particular needs.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 12, 2004
SANTA CLARA, Calif. - Intel Corp. named President Paul S. Otellini yesterday as its next chief executive officer, for the first time choosing a nonengineer to run the world's largest computer-chip maker. Otellini, a 30-year Intel veteran who made his name overseeing the introduction of the Pentium processor in 1993, will replace Craig R. Barrett in May. Barrett, who expanded Intel beyond personal computers into communications in the 1990s, will step aside as Intel struggles with slowing growth and a record stockpile of unsold chips.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | December 25, 2000
A few years ago, whenever a hot new processor hit the streets, I could barely wait to get my hands on one. Each new computer promised to do something that the one before could not, and it usually delivered - better graphics, better sound, less waiting around for something to happen. Ten days ago, the latest and greatest arrived for a test drive - this time a Pentium 4, loaded with goodies, including remote control speakers, six-way power seat and a moon roof. Our little tech crew opened the box, set the machine up, turned it on and put it through its paces.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | June 27, 2002
ONE OF THE benefits of writing a column is that you get every possible opportunity to learn from your mistakes - and an opportunity to apologize in public. So, Microsoft, I owe you an apology. A couple of weeks ago, when I said the Windows XP operating system was a bloated hog that turned today's hottest computers into tortoises that run no faster than the last generation of PCs, I was telling only half the story. Windows XP is indeed a hog, but it's not the only reason that today's fast computers aren't much better at real work than the PCs available two years ago. Another reason is that Intel's flagship processor, the Pentium 4, is as much a product of marketing hype as of technology.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | November 26, 2001
Buying a computer for the holidays? Here's my advice: Don't sweat it. Today's PCs are astounding bargains. Processing power, memory and hard disk storage have become so cheap that a manufacturer would have to go out of his way to produce a bad computer. A yearlong industry slump and competition for market share have also driven PC prices deeper than ever. Walk into any store, pick one off the shelf, you're likely to wind up with a machine perfectly capable of the word processing, Web browsing, e-mail and financial record-keeping that most of us do with our PCs. That said, it pays to know enough to buy a computer that meets your particular needs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | December 25, 2000
A few years ago, whenever a hot new processor hit the streets, I could barely wait to get my hands on one. Each new computer promised to do something that the one before could not, and it usually delivered - better graphics, better sound, less waiting around for something to happen. Ten days ago, the latest and greatest arrived for a test drive - this time a Pentium 4, loaded with goodies, including remote control speakers, six-way power seat and a moon roof. Our little tech crew opened the box, set the machine up, turned it on and put it through its paces.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2000
LAS VEGAS - Those three fellows with brightly colored faces who pitch the power of Intel's Pentium III chip in TV commercials can add a fourth, paint-happy partner today. Intel, the chip-making giant whose processors power most of today's PCs, is officially adding the Pentium 4 to its line of microprocessors, promising dramatic improvements in multimedia performance and a more dynamic Internet experience. The new chips, expected to be available this week in top-of-the-line computers from major manufacturers such as Dell, Compaq, Gateway and Hewlett-Packard, run up to 50 percent faster than the Pentium III. They won't be cheap.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Benny Evangelista and Benny Evangelista,San Francisco Chronicle | June 5, 2000
A new high-tech piano could be the perfect toy for the musically challenged dot-com magnate with extra cash to burn. Lots of extra cash. The glitzy, chip-powered Yamaha Disklavier Pro 2000, on display recently in San Francisco, can literally play itself and run its own video of the pianist. It's so talented it can recreate an evening with the late George Gershwin, with the same flair and style of the master himself. The fully loaded musical instrument has enough power to make the common desktop PC jealous.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 16, 2000
PALM SPRINGS, Calif. -- Intel Corp. showed off a new microprocessor, code-named Willamette and running at 1.5 gigahertz, as the world's biggest semiconductor maker continues its race against rivals to have the fastest computer chip. At that speed, 1.5 billion electrical pulses are going through the chip every second to perform computer tasks. Intel's fastest production model chip is a Pentium III running at 800 megahertz, a little more than half as fast. Intel is in a heated race with rival Advanced Micro Devices Inc. to have the fastest chip on the market.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | December 16, 1994
Paul McMullin wants to reassure people that "we're not going to have satellites falling on our heads" because Intel Corp.'s Pentium chip has a flaw.Still, the network administrator at the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory said scientists at the high-tech center in Howard County are worried that the glitch could throw off critical calculations -- with potentially serious consequences."
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser | December 18, 1994
Intel Corp., the world's largest semiconductor maker, was already the butt of jokes on the Internet when International Business Machines Corp. announced last week that it would suspend sales of computers made with Intel's Pentium chip because of a bug affecting mathematical calculations.IBM's action left Intel complaining that Big Blue was exaggerating the seriousness of the flaw, but IBM contended it had found the bug to be more serious than Intel had disclosed. Because it failed to disclose upon discovering it last summer, Intel was in a poor position to wage a credibility war with IBM. Its stock plunged.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Henry Norr and Henry Norr,san francisco chronicle | September 6, 1999
Apple has overhauled the high end of its Macintosh computer lineup, rolling out new desktop models so powerful that it calls them "personal supercomputers." Dubbed the Power Mac G4 line, the machines are built around the PowerPC G4, a new Motorola microprocessor with features to speed up graphics, multimedia and scientific calculations. Apple also showed off a sleek new flat-panel digital monitor that measures 22 inches diagonally, the largest liquid-crystal display ever brought to market.
ENTERTAINMENT
By DWIGHT SILVERMAN and DWIGHT SILVERMAN,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | March 15, 1999
It seems whenever Intel Corp. begins shipping a new processor, it comes with an unwanted feature -- controversy.When Intel's low-cost entry, the Celeron, was introduced, critics complained about its lack of onboard memory, or cache. And remember the floating-point math bug in the original Pentium? The Pentium Pro and Pentium II chips had similar problems.Now we have the Pentium III, with its built-in serial number that privacy groups say amounts to "Big Brother Inside." And there's the fact that the Pentium III is actually a Pentium II, with 70 extra software commands to boost multimedia performance.
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