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By Jules Witcover | July 28, 2010
The leaking of 91,000 classified documents on the Afghanistan war is being compared, imprecisely, with the Pentagon Papers leak of 39 years ago that unmasked official U.S. deceptions about the Vietnam War. The latest document dump merely provides more raw material with which to make similar accusations. The Pentagon Papers were a careful compilation of reports and analysis by military officialdom that often clashed with the rose-colored Nixon administration contentions of seeing light at the end of a tunnel when there was little of it. They were intentionally leaked by Pentagon official Daniel Ellsberg in the hope of putting brakes on a failing policy.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | July 3, 2013
As we celebrate the birth by revolution of this country, let's take a moment to put some historical context to the actions of Edward Snowden and to consider whether he is a traitor or a patriot. Back in the 1780s, when everyone in America was by definition a traitor, a spy or an insurgent as far as England was concerned, the Founding Fathers included language in the Constitution that defined treason - the only crime so defined in the document - so that citizens could not be executed for merely speaking out against the country's leadership.
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FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 8, 2003
There is almost nothing that can cheapen and shrink a major moment of national history like a mediocre made-for-TV movie. And The Pentagon Papers, which purports to tell how and why former Pentagon employee Daniel Ellsberg leaked secret documents on the Vietnam War in 1971, is a mediocre made-for-TV movie. The primary problem is that director Rod Holcomb (The Education of Max Bickford) gives us pastiche instead of a film with a unified artistic vision and compelling emotional arc. Holcomb imitates the visual styles of several great feature films and then cobbles them together into a relatively lifeless television movie.
NEWS
November 29, 2012
Finally, the trial of the century made the front page of The Sun ("Accused WikiLeaker to ask for dismissal," Nov. 26). I will join others outside the main gate to Fort Meade to show support for the whistleblower Pfc. Bradley Manning during his latest hearing. Some generations ago, Daniel Ellsberg took the risks of peace and released the Pentagon Papers. The papers revealed how the U.S. government consistently lied about the imperial war in Vietnam. For that remarkable action, Mr. Ellsberg faced the full wrath of the Nixon administration, which was one of the most crooked of all time.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1995
One colleague described Ben Bradlee as a man who could put his cigarette out on a coffee saucer -- "fine bone china, even" -- and escape being called a boor for it.That's how confident he is of his own legitimacy and personal authority. That's how blinding is the blaze of his charisma.This, of course, is exaggeration. But, then, so is Benjamin Crowninshield Bradlee, paragon executive editor of the Washington Post, illuminator of the Pentagon Papers, director of the Post's Watergate coverage, St. George to Richard Nixon's dragon.
NEWS
December 5, 1999
1971: Voting age becomes 18 1971: Pentagon Papers printed 1973: OPEC sets oil embargo 1975: U.S.-Soviet space linkup Pub Date: 12/08/99
NEWS
January 23, 2006
Anthony Franciosa, 77, whose strong portrayals of moody, troubled characters made him a Hollywood star in the 1950s and '60s but whose combative behavior on movie sets hampered his career, died Thursday at a Los Angeles hospital after suffering a stroke. From his first important film role as the brother of a drug addict in A Hatful of Rain, Mr. Franciosa became known for his portrayals of complicated young men. On television, he starred in Valentine's Day, The Name of the Game and Matt Helm.
NEWS
November 21, 1994
Erwin N. Griswold, 90, the U.S. solicitor general under Presidents Johnson and Nixon whose more than 100 cases before the Supreme Court included the Pentagon Papers arguments, died Saturday in Boston. His legal career spanned 65 years, more than half of them as a faculty member at Harvard Law School where he was dean for 21 years before joining the Johnson administration in 1967 as solicitor general, the federal government's top-ranking courtroom lawyer. Mr. Griswold's most famous case may have come in 1971, when he argued unsuccessfully on behalf of the Nixon administration that publication of the Pentagon Papers -- which chronicled the U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War -- would "have the effect of causing immediate and irreparable harm to the security of the United States."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 7, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Newly released, the latest batch of conversations secretly taped by President Nixon depicts him again as unself-consciously anti-Semitic, informing his aides at one point that the communist conspiracy against the United States was entirely composed of Jews except for Whitaker Chambers and Alger Hiss.The tapes also show the depth of his anger against the New York Times for its publication in 1971 of the Pentagon Papers, the government's secret history of activities that led to America's involvement in the Vietnam War.Nixon's anti-Semitism and his anger at the Times came together when he demanded that no one in the White House provide any information to the paper's Washington bureau, which was headed at the time by Max Frankel.
NEWS
February 23, 1993
* Gerhard A. Gesell, 82, a federal judge who presided over Watergate cases and the Iran-contra affair died Friday of liver cancer in Washington. Judge Gesell, appointed to the U.S. District Court in Washington in 1967 by President Lyndon B. Johnson, also oversaw the release of the Pentagon Papers and a case tied to the legalization of abortion.* David L. Bazelon, a former federal appeals court judge who pioneered the application of psychiatry to criminal law in expanding the insanity defense, died of pneumonia Friday at his home in Washington.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2011
A military hearing for Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, the former intelligence analyst accused of giving classified materials about the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq to WikiLeaks, has been scheduled for next month at Fort Meade. The primary purpose of the Article 32 hearing is "to evaluate the relative strengths and weaknesses of the government's case as well as to provide the defense with an opportunity to obtain pretrial discovery," Manning's attorney wrote Monday on his website. The hearing is scheduled to begin Dec. 16 and is expected to last five days, according to attorney David E. Coombs.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 28, 2010
The leaking of 91,000 classified documents on the Afghanistan war is being compared, imprecisely, with the Pentagon Papers leak of 39 years ago that unmasked official U.S. deceptions about the Vietnam War. The latest document dump merely provides more raw material with which to make similar accusations. The Pentagon Papers were a careful compilation of reports and analysis by military officialdom that often clashed with the rose-colored Nixon administration contentions of seeing light at the end of a tunnel when there was little of it. They were intentionally leaked by Pentagon official Daniel Ellsberg in the hope of putting brakes on a failing policy.
NEWS
August 10, 2008
ANTHONY J. RUSSO, 71 Leaked Pentagon Papers Anthony J. Russo, a shaggy-haired, countercultural, unemployed policy wonk when he teamed up with Daniel Ellsberg, a more button-down anti-war figure, to leak the voluminous, top-secret government history of the Vietnam War called the Pentagon Papers, died Wednesday in Suffolk, Va. Mr. Ellsberg announced Mr. Russo's death on the Web site antiwar.com. Mr. Russo suffered from heart trouble. Mr. Russo chafed at being called the "Xerox aide" because of his role in finding a copying machine and working long nights to reproduce the 7,000-page study.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | July 12, 2006
CHICAGO -- When The New York Times published a story about a secret government program to find terrorists by monitoring financial transactions, conservatives responded as if the paper had given Osama bin Laden the keys to a missile silo. The story, asserted President Bush, "does great harm to the United States of America." Vice President Dick Cheney said the Times and other newspapers "have made the job of defending against further terrorist attacks more difficult." Republican Rep. Peter T. King of New York said the Times' decision was "treasonous."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 11, 2006
NEW YORK --A.M. Rosenthal, a Pulitzer Prize-winning foreign correspondent who became executive editor of The New York Times and led the newspaper's global news operations through 17 years of record growth, modernization and major journalistic change, died yesterday at Mount Sinai Medical Center in Manhattan. He was 84. He suffered a stroke two weeks ago, his son Andrew said. Mr. Rosenthal lived in Manhattan. From his days as a campus correspondent at City College through his years as a reporter in Europe, Asia and Africa, Mr. Rosenthal's talent, drive and ambition propelled him to the highest echelons of the Times and American journalism.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Meredith Cohn and Stacey Hirsh and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2004
The final report of the Sept. 11 commission is coming out in paperback this summer to be sold in bookstores nationwide, and with its release the government is reverting to a decades-old practice of using a private company to print its very public documents. The government has hired New York publishing firm W.W. Norton & Co. Inc. to print hundreds of thousands of copies of the report to be sold in chain, independent and online bookstores around the country. The book will be sold for $10 and is set to be published about July 26. With the release date close to two major political parties' conventions, the final report of the Sept.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | November 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- In what has been called the last battle of the Cold War, longtime liberal activist Morton Halperin faced the Senate Armed Services Committee yesterday and defended his thoughts and actions on policies from Vietnam to Somalia.Mr. Halperin, President Clinton's most controversial nominee since Lani Guinier, faces a tough fight for confirmation as assistant secretary of defense for democracy and peacekeeping. His opponents charge that the former Vietnam anti-war activist and CIA critic now is too eager to send troops abroad under the United Nations banner, and is unfit for a sensitive Pentagon post.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2004
It is a different time, a different war and a different country. But America's most famous leaker, Daniel Ellsberg, senses a kindred spirit in a 29-year-old British intelligence officer now facing criminal charges for leaking a top-secret National Security Agency document a year ago in a failed attempt to derail the looming war on Iraq. Last week, shortly after Katharine Gun pleaded not guilty to violating Britain's Official Secrets Act, Ellsberg and other anti-war Americans launched a public campaign defending her actions.
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