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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 4, 2004
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon has proposed a plan to withdraw its two Army divisions from Germany and undertake an array of other changes in its European-based forces, in the most significant rearrangement of the U.S. military around the world since the beginning of the Cold War, according to U.S. and allied officials. Pentagon policy-makers said the aim is to afford maximum flexibility in sending forces to the Middle East, Central Asia and other potential battlegrounds. But some experts and allied officials are concerned that the shift will reduce Washington's influence in NATO and weaken its diplomatic links with its allies, all at a time of rising anti-American sentiment around the world.
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NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | September 5, 2008
China says quake made worse by building flaws BEIJING: Nearly four months after China's devastating earthquake, a government scientist acknowledged yesterday that a rush to build schools in recent years likely led to construction flaws causing so many of them to collapse. It was the first official admission that low building standards may have been behind the deaths of thousands of children. Government critics have raised questions about shoddy construction after the 7.9-magnitude quake killed nearly 70,000 people in Sichuan province, including many students crushed to death when their classrooms crumbled.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK DAILY NEWS | June 27, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Pentagon officials said yesterday that the anti-terrorist precautions at a housing complex in Saudi Arabia failed because no one ever expected a bomb so huge."
NEWS
By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Julian E. Barnes and Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Julian E. Barnes,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 8, 2007
BAGHDAD -- The size of the U.S. force in Iraq has reached nearly 162,000 troops, the largest American presence at any point during the 52 months of the war, Pentagon officials said yesterday. The increase is the result of the regular replacement of forces and not an additional buildup of U.S. troops, said Bryan Whitman, a Pentagon spokesman. "There is no change to the level of effort and the combat power that we are projecting into Iraq," Whitman said. Officials reported yesterday that five more troops had been killed in Iraq, bringing the total this month to 21 and putting the military on pace to see more than 100 deaths in August.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 3, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The commanding general of the Army's Aberdeen Proving Ground has decided to retire after admitting that he committed adultery while separated from his wife more than five years ago, Pentagon officials said yesterday.The officials said the commander, Maj. Gen. John Longhouser, became the subject of an inquiry after an anonymous tip about the affair was received over a telephone hot line established because of a flurry of sex abuse cases at Aberdeen, where male drill sergeants had preyed on young female recruits.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 12, 2003
WASHINGTON - The U.S. government is trying to enlist more than 100 Iraqi exiles in America and Europe to serve as temporary advisers and liaisons with the citizens and ministries of Iraq in the aftermath of a U.S.-led invasion, a senior Pentagon official said yesterday. In outlining some of the government's plans for a postwar reconstruction, Pentagon officials said they also planned to pay the salaries of Iraq's civilian government officials - about 2 million people - and also pay the Iraqi army to help build roads, work on bridges, remove rubble and rebuild the country.
NEWS
By New York Times Service | March 7, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration is about t propose a sweeping new round of military base closings that seeks to reflect declining troop levels and changing military missions, senior Pentagon officials say.Under orders from Defense Secretary Les Aspin, the armed services recommended in the last 10 days that at least 30 major installations be closed and as many as 150 other depots and smaller sites nationwide be consolidated or reduced, military officials...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 24, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Russia is selling diesel submarines to Ira despite protests from Washington, and the first of the vessels is expected to sail for Iran shortly, senior Pentagon officials said yesterday.The sale worries the U.S. Navy, which says the Iranian submarines will introduce a new threat to naval operations in the sea lanes of the Persian Gulf and the Arabian Sea, which carry much of the world's oil.According to Pentagon officials, Russia is selling two or three submarines to Iran, which will be the first Persian Gulf country to possess submarines.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon began alerting 43,000 Reserve and National Guard troops late yesterday for the possibility of yearlong duty in Iraq or Kuwait as part of a rotation plan that would reduce the overall U.S. military presence in Iraq by next spring, senior military officials said. The alert warnings and deployment orders approved yesterday by Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld reflected deep concern by Pentagon officials - and within the administration - over stresses that large mobilizations have placed on reservists and their families.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 29, 2004
WASHINGTON - On April 18, 2003, a television news crew from Minnesota videotaped U.S. troops in Iraq using bolt cutters to break through chains and wire seals on the door of a dusty bunker and finding explosives stored inside. The video did not appear significant at the time, particularly because it did not reveal any weapons of mass destruction. But now, days before a presidential election that is turning on how President Bush has handled Iraq, it appears to be the strongest evidence so far in the debate over whether a huge cache of explosives disappeared on the Americans' watch.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 14, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Pentagon has been using a little-known power to obtain banking and credit records of hundreds of Americans and others suspected of terrorism or espionage inside the United States, part of an aggressive expansion by the military into domestic intelligence gathering. The CIA has also been issuing what are known as national security letters to gain access to financial records from American companies, though it has done so only rarely, intelligence officials say. Banks, credit card companies and other financial institutions receiving the letters have usually turned over documents voluntarily, allowing investigators to examine the financial assets and transactions of U.S. military personnel and civilians, officials say. The FBI, the lead agency on domestic counterterrorism and espionage, has issued thousands of national security letters since the attacks of Sept.
NEWS
By Julian E. Barnes and Julian E. Barnes,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 2, 2006
WASHINGTON -- As concern in the Defense Department mounts over increasingly negative coverage of the Iraq war, the Pentagon has launched a rapid-response public relations effort to rebut news stories that officials believe are inaccurate or misleading. Although all presidential administrations have been critical of the news media, most have avoided regular, continuing public fights with journalists. But in recent weeks, the Bush administration has shown a willingness to fight over facts and reporters' analysis of news events.
NEWS
By GEORGE J. BRYJAK | August 22, 2006
SAN DIEGO -- On Nov. 19, 2005, a unit of Marines arrived at the Iraqi village of Haditha to remove the bodies of civilians reportedly killed by a roadside blast. What they found were infants, women and children shot in the face and chest and the body of a wheelchair-bound elderly man riddled with bullets. A group of Marines are under criminal investigation that could lead to murder charges in the slayings of 24 civilians in the western Iraqi village. Like Abu Ghraib, Haditha has become synonymous with war atrocities, in this case an alleged act of retribution for the roadside bombing death of a fellow Marine.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 26, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A military investigation into the deaths of two dozen Iraqis last November is expected to find that a small number of Marines in western Iraq carried out extensive, unprovoked killing of civilians, congressional, military and Pentagon officials said yesterday. Two lawyers involved in discussions about individual Marines' defenses said they thought the investigation could result in charges of murder, a capital offense. That possibility and the emerging details of the killings have raised fears that the incident could be the gravest case involving misconduct by American ground forces in Iraq.
NEWS
By TOM BOWMAN and TOM BOWMAN,SUN REPORTER | March 17, 2006
WASHINGTON -- U.S. and Iraqi forces launched a major helicopter and armored operation north of Baghdad yesterday, targeting insurgent forces and weapons caches, in what Pentagon officials described as the largest air assault since the war began three years ago. About 1,500 soldiers, including elements of the U.S. 101st Air Assault Division and the Iraqi army's 4th Division, swept into an area northeast of Samarra, the city where the bombing of a Shiite...
NEWS
By MARK MAZZETTI and MARK MAZZETTI,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 2, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The White House said yesterday that it has demanded information from the Pentagon about a secret U.S. military offensive to plant stories in the Iraqi media, and senators are planning to meet privately today to hear details about the information operations campaign in Iraq. White House spokesman Scott McClellan said the White House was "very concerned" about reports that a defense contractor in Iraq, working with U.S. troops, was paying newspapers in Baghdad to run positive stories written by U.S. soldiers.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 17, 2001
WASHINGTON - During the Vietnam War, they nicknamed it "Puff the Magic Dragon" because at night the torrent of bullets looked like a dragon spitting fire. Its successor was a larger, more sophisticated aircraft dubbed the "Fabulous Four-Engine Fighter." Now it is called "Spectre." A newer version is "Spooky." And on Monday two of the AC-130 gunships focused a barrage of fire from their cannons, Gatling guns and howitzers on Taliban forces in Afghanistan. Again yesterday, the lumbering gunships attacked Taliban militia headquarters, garrisons and troops outside the southern Afghan city of Kandahar, said Pentagon officials.
NEWS
By MARK MAZZETTI and MARK MAZZETTI,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 2, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The White House said yesterday that it has demanded information from the Pentagon about a secret U.S. military offensive to plant stories in the Iraqi media, and senators are planning to meet privately today to hear details about the information operations campaign in Iraq. White House spokesman Scott McClellan said the White House was "very concerned" about reports that a defense contractor in Iraq, working with U.S. troops, was paying newspapers in Baghdad to run positive stories written by U.S. soldiers.
NEWS
By SIOBHAN GORMAN AND TOM BOWMAN and SIOBHAN GORMAN AND TOM BOWMAN,SUN REPORTERS | November 3, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration should re-evaluate its long-term plan for detaining suspected terrorists in light of reports that the CIA has a secret prison system in Eastern Europe and elsewhere, members of Congress and current and former intelligence officials say. Details of the post-9/11 network of so-called "black sites" were first reported by The Washington Post and the locations confirmed by The Sun. The report raised questions about how...
NEWS
By Paul Richter and Paul Richter,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 5, 2005
WASHINGTON - U.S. military officials will gradually hand over 110 Afghan prisoners to Afghanistan's government in the largest repatriation of detainees from the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, since it was converted to a military prison for terrorism suspects three years ago, the Pentagon said yesterday. In addition, U.S. authorities plan to turn over 350 Afghans who are in U.S. custody in Afghanistan after prison space is built to accommodate them, officials said. Under a newly signed agreement between the countries, Afghan authorities then will decide which prisoners to detain and which to release, Pentagon officials said.
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