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By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2012
A union that represents hundreds of public workers in Baltimore County is threatening to file an unfair labor practices complaint against the county, saying a pension bill introduced by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz attempts to sidestep ongoing contract negotiations. The bill, pending before the County Council, would end the practice of using overtime wages to calculate pension benefits for members of AFSCME, whose members include laborers in the Department of Public Works and other agencies.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
Baltimore unions and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake have struck a deal on her latest sweeping pension change, which would switch some new city employees from a traditional pension system to a 401(k)-style plan. The agreement -- which was passed by a City Council committee Thursday -- will give new workers an option of selecting a 401(k)-style plan or a "hybrid" plan that combines such an account with a traditional pension. Glenard S. Middleton, director of the union that represents city workers, said he negotiated with Rawlings-Blake directly on the issue and got about two-thirds of what the unions wanted.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
Union members from around Baltimore are planning a rally Monday to protest legislation by Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz that would reduce some county employees' pension benefits. County Council members are scheduled to vote Monday on the proposal, which would end the practice of letting members of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees use overtime in their pension calculations. AFSCME represents workers in the county's Department of Recreation and Parks, the Department of Public Works, and other agencies.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
Union members from around Baltimore are planning a rally Monday to protest legislation by Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz that would reduce some county employees' pension benefits. County Council members are scheduled to vote Monday on the proposal, which would end the practice of letting members of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees use overtime in their pension calculations. AFSCME represents workers in the county's Department of Recreation and Parks, the Department of Public Works, and other agencies.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
A bill from Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz that could have reduced some workers' pensions stalled in the County Council Monday after pressure from unions that complained the bill undermined labor rights. The 4-3 vote to table the legislation came after union members and state labor leaders rallied outside the county courthouse, saying the bill sidestepped contract negotiations for members of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. The bill would have stopped AFSCME members from using overtime in their pension calculations, which they have done for more than 30 years.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | June 7, 1993
The County Council has scheduled a public hearing tonight on a bill that would increase the time an elected or appointed official who worked previously for the county or state must serve to qualify for a pension.The bill, which was sponsored by Councilwoman Maureen Lamb, was prompted by concerns that the pension fund was being drained. Ms. Lamb, an Annapolis Democrat, blamed the rapid depletion of money on people with many years of state service who join the county work force for a short time and then retire with a full county pension.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | July 19, 1994
The Anne Arundel County Council last night passed a bill that requires appointed and elected officials to reduce their monthly pension benefit if they wish surviving spouses to continue receiving benefits after they die.Under current provisions of the financially troubled pension fund for appointed and elected officials, surviving spouses continue to receive the full monthly benefit until they die. The change will save the county $1.6 million.The vote on the pension bill was unanimous.At a public hearing before the vote, some council members said that by voting for the measure, they right the wrong in a 1989 bill that increased pension benefits.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | March 17, 1995
State Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. urged fellow senators yesterday to support a bill that would prohibit three top gubernatorial aides from collecting tens of thousands of dollars in early pension payments from Prince George's County.Mr. Miller, a Prince George's Democrat, told a Senate subcommittee that the bill would prevent the county's pension program and others like it from benefiting elected and appointed officials who lose their jobs for political reasons."Appointees accept jobs knowing that they serve at the will of the appointing authority and, indirectly, at the will of the people," Mr. Miller said.
NEWS
December 6, 1996
The union representing Anne Arundel County police officers has filed a federal lawsuit that would block County Executive John G. Gary's bill cutting county pension costs.The suit, filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore by the Fraternal Order of Police, Lodge 70, alleges that Gary's pension bill will cost 450 county police officers more than $13 million in guaranteed benefits. The County Council approved the bill unanimously Monday night.County unions threatened to file such a lawsuit during fivemonths of debate over pension reform, which county officials say will save Anne Arundel $3 million a year.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 7, 1997
...TC Despite lingering concerns over a legislative maneuver by the Baltimore City Council, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke has signed an amended police and fire pension bill that will increase benefits to older retirees and save active officers $850 in contributions this year.Last week, only 11 of 19 council members showed up for a special session called to address a legal problem with the pension bill before the council adjourned for the summer. Those present were four short of the 15-vote "supermajority" needed to amend and pass a bill at a single meeting.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
A bill from Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz that could have reduced some workers' pensions stalled in the County Council Monday after pressure from unions that complained the bill undermined labor rights. The 4-3 vote to table the legislation came after union members and state labor leaders rallied outside the county courthouse, saying the bill sidestepped contract negotiations for members of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. The bill would have stopped AFSCME members from using overtime in their pension calculations, which they have done for more than 30 years.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for sunny skies, with a high temperature near 78 degrees. It is expected to be clear tonight, with a low temperature around 50 degrees. TRAFFIC Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM LAST NIGHT... Baltimore County unions oppose Kamenetz pension bill : Public-employee unions are urging Baltimore County Council members to reject a proposal by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz that would cut pension benefits for some workers, saying it sends a bad message to labor leaders and undermines negotiations.
NEWS
Alison Knezevich | March 13, 2012
At their work session this afternoon, Baltimore County Council members plan to discuss a proposal by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz that would end the practice of using overtime to calculate pensions for members of AFSCME, the union that represents workers in the Department of Public Works and other agencies. Last week, AFSCME threatened to file an unfair labor practices complaint , saying that the issue is being discussed in negotiations.   Kamenetz's administration calls the proposal a way to save taxpayer dollars, saying that AFSCME workers are getting “an arbitrary perk that sweetens pension benefits for a single class of employees.” The administration says the bill would save $502,000 a year, based on the amount of overtime worked by AFSCME members.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2012
Public-employee unions are urging Baltimore County Council members to reject a proposal by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz that would cut pension benefits for some workers, saying it sends a bad message to labor leaders and undermines negotiations. The legislation, discussed Tuesday by council members, would end the practice of using overtime to calculate retirement benefits for members of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. The union represents employees in the Department of Public Works, the Department of Recreation and Parks and other agencies.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2012
A union that represents hundreds of public workers in Baltimore County is threatening to file an unfair labor practices complaint against the county, saying a pension bill introduced by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz attempts to sidestep ongoing contract negotiations. The bill, pending before the County Council, would end the practice of using overtime wages to calculate pension benefits for members of AFSCME, whose members include laborers in the Department of Public Works and other agencies.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2012
Baltimore County retirees and union leaders urged state lawmakers Friday to reject a measure that would limit some public employees' pension benefits, calling it unfair and illegal. At a Baltimore County House delegation meeting in Annapolis, two retirees said the county is already cheating them out of pension benefits. The bill, requested by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, would let the county continue to exceed state restrictions on how much can be deducted from some people's pensions.
NEWS
June 12, 1996
JOHN G. GARY may want to wage the legal battle over the Anne Arundel County pension system all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, but it's time to stage a strategic retreat.The county executive made his political point that the pensions were grossly generous and that a number of former elected and appointed county officials acted in a blatantly self-interested fashion with little regard for the taxpayers of Anne Arundel.U.S. District Court Judge Andre Davis decisively ruled against the county in its efforts to roll back pension benefits for 93 elected and appointed officials.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1998
A key Maryland Senate committee approved a bill last night that would significantly increase pension benefits for public school teachers and state workers -- but adopted a markedly different approach than the House of Delegates.With the end of the 90-day legislative session looming at midnight tomorrow, the prospects for final passage of the heavily amended bill appeared uncertain."This is a take-it-or-leave-it bill," said Sen. Barbara A. Hoffman, the Baltimore Democrat who chairs the powerful Budget and Taxation Committee, which passed the bill unanimously.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2010
Holding signs that said "City Hall Has Turned Their Backs on Police and Firefighters," about two dozen police and firefighters union members protested the City Council's passage of a pension bill that took effect Thursday. The union members wore shirts saying, "We Protect You. Help Protect Us," and yelled as local city and business leaders entered a fundraising event for Councilman Bill Cole at Luckie's Tavern on Market Place downtown. The new pension bill drastically alters the police and firefighter pension plan.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | January 20, 2010
The Baltimore County Council approved Tuesday night the weaker of two pension reform bills, adopting a measure that is unlikely to satisfy critics of the current system, which greatly exceeds benefits to most working families. The panel voted 6-1 to cap pensions of elected officials at 60 percent of the annual salary, which is currently $54,000 for council members. The law, drafted by Councilman Kevin Kamenetz, takes effect Feb. 1. It applies to anyone who joins the council after that date, but not to current members.
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