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By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,Orange County Register | July 7, 1992
Director Penny Marshall is not worried that her new film, "A League of Their Own," might be a turnoff to women because it's a baseball movie. And she's not worried that it will scare off men because it's a movie about women.But Ms. Marshall, who has a grander vision, is worried about war, earthquakes and other natural disasters. Seriously."My last movie ['Awakenings'] opened [when] the Gulf war broke out," said the director with the most distinctive whine in Hollywood. "After sitting in front of a TV set for 10 hours watching maps and briefings, who wanted to go out and watch Bobby [Robert De Niro]
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August 26, 2004
"I always thought I was a doormat - I let people walk on me. Now I'm a piece of cement. It's harder, but it's got a star on it." - Penny Marshall, on her star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 3, 1994
Incongruous or what? The hotel dining room is posh, brocaded in silks, and through its stately aisles rush liveried waiters with the muted aplomb of funeral directors. Swanky bouquets detonate their expensive colors on each linen-shrouded table, and the silverware and crystal gleam like diamonds in a tiara.And there, in the middle of it all, sits . . . Laverne?Yes, Laverne -- that is, Penny Marshall, with those sad Brooklyn eyes and the look of being endlessly put-upon, sitting in a funk of exhaustion so dense it would, a few days later, cause her to collapse and briefly enter the hospital.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2002
A midmorning fire in Southwest Baltimore awakened the heroics in four young men yesterday, when they heard screams that sent them racing toward a two-story Formstone house engulfed in flames. Angie Bicklin, 21, her face and hair burned, stood in front of her Pigtown house in the 1200 block of Sargeant St., crying for someone to get her three young sons from upstairs as the one-alarm fire raged. It was her brother, Bruce A. Bicklin, 23, who led three friends down the street into the house, moments before Baltimore firefighters arrived on the scene about 10:30 a.m. Bicklin managed to rescue two of his nephews before jumping from the second story, his fall through the black smoke broken by his friends below.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2004
"I always thought I was a doormat - I let people walk on me. Now I'm a piece of cement. It's harder, but it's got a star on it." - Penny Marshall, on her star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | June 13, 1991
If Columbia Pictures has its way, Madonna will play Debra Winger's younger sister in Penny Marshall's "A League of Their Own," the story of an all-women's baseball team set in the 1940s. And if talks with Tom Hanks continue to go well, he'll reunite with Marshall with whom he collaborated on "Big" to play the team's coach.Whether Madonna and Columbia can come to terms is a matter of speculation. "The studio is offering $1," quips one person privy to the negotiations. "She's asking $1 billion."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 19, 2001
Things were never easy for Beverly Donofrio - and that may explain why she never made things easy for anyone else. Her inability to play the hand fate dealt her is the crux of the engaging, over-long Riding In Cars With Boys. Based on the real-life Donofrio's memoirs, the movie tracks Beverly (Drew Barrymore) over 15 years, interspersing the narrative with scenes of her grown son. It's immediately clear that Beverly controls this relationship, much to her son's frustration. We first meet Beverly as a pre-teen, bonding lovingly with her father (James Woods)
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 22, 1995
Do the following words make your heart beat just a little faster?'One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight. Shlemiel, shlimazel, hasenpfefer, incorporated."
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | August 9, 1995
Maryland Public Television launches its 12-day fall pledge drive tonight with a three-hour block devoted to multi-media holistic physician Dr. Deepak Chopra. And Laverne and Shirley are back -- again.* "The Omen" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- In an unsuccessful pilot, three unrelated people (Brett Cullen, Bill Sadler and Chelsea Field) who have lost loved ones to a mysterious force come together to protect others. NBC.* "The Laverne & Shirley Reunion" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 11, 1991
'Awakenings'Starring Robin Williams and Robert De Niro.Directed by Penny Marshall.Released by Columbia.Rated PG-13.*** 1/2 "Awakenings" is about a man who goes to sleep one night and leaves a wake-up call not for the next morning but the next decade.Dramatizing a medical mystery story out of neurologist Oliver Sacks' book of the same title, it watches as a concerned young doctor manages to coax a ward of encephalitis victims out of their perpetual snoozes and back to a life of sorts.Robin Williams, at his most muted, plays a vaguely fictionalized version of Sacks, here called Dr. Malcolm Sayers, a neurological researcher with a profound horror of actual life and real people.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 19, 2001
Things were never easy for Beverly Donofrio - and that may explain why she never made things easy for anyone else. Her inability to play the hand fate dealt her is the crux of the engaging, over-long Riding In Cars With Boys. Based on the real-life Donofrio's memoirs, the movie tracks Beverly (Drew Barrymore) over 15 years, interspersing the narrative with scenes of her grown son. It's immediately clear that Beverly controls this relationship, much to her son's frustration. We first meet Beverly as a pre-teen, bonding lovingly with her father (James Woods)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | August 9, 1995
Maryland Public Television launches its 12-day fall pledge drive tonight with a three-hour block devoted to multi-media holistic physician Dr. Deepak Chopra. And Laverne and Shirley are back -- again.* "The Omen" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- In an unsuccessful pilot, three unrelated people (Brett Cullen, Bill Sadler and Chelsea Field) who have lost loved ones to a mysterious force come together to protect others. NBC.* "The Laverne & Shirley Reunion" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 22, 1995
Do the following words make your heart beat just a little faster?'One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight. Shlemiel, shlimazel, hasenpfefer, incorporated."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 3, 1994
Incongruous or what? The hotel dining room is posh, brocaded in silks, and through its stately aisles rush liveried waiters with the muted aplomb of funeral directors. Swanky bouquets detonate their expensive colors on each linen-shrouded table, and the silverware and crystal gleam like diamonds in a tiara.And there, in the middle of it all, sits . . . Laverne?Yes, Laverne -- that is, Penny Marshall, with those sad Brooklyn eyes and the look of being endlessly put-upon, sitting in a funk of exhaustion so dense it would, a few days later, cause her to collapse and briefly enter the hospital.
FEATURES
By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,Orange County Register | July 7, 1992
Director Penny Marshall is not worried that her new film, "A League of Their Own," might be a turnoff to women because it's a baseball movie. And she's not worried that it will scare off men because it's a movie about women.But Ms. Marshall, who has a grander vision, is worried about war, earthquakes and other natural disasters. Seriously."My last movie ['Awakenings'] opened [when] the Gulf war broke out," said the director with the most distinctive whine in Hollywood. "After sitting in front of a TV set for 10 hours watching maps and briefings, who wanted to go out and watch Bobby [Robert De Niro]
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | June 13, 1991
If Columbia Pictures has its way, Madonna will play Debra Winger's younger sister in Penny Marshall's "A League of Their Own," the story of an all-women's baseball team set in the 1940s. And if talks with Tom Hanks continue to go well, he'll reunite with Marshall with whom he collaborated on "Big" to play the team's coach.Whether Madonna and Columbia can come to terms is a matter of speculation. "The studio is offering $1," quips one person privy to the negotiations. "She's asking $1 billion."
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2002
A midmorning fire in Southwest Baltimore awakened the heroics in four young men yesterday, when they heard screams that sent them racing toward a two-story Formstone house engulfed in flames. Angie Bicklin, 21, her face and hair burned, stood in front of her Pigtown house in the 1200 block of Sargeant St., crying for someone to get her three young sons from upstairs as the one-alarm fire raged. It was her brother, Bruce A. Bicklin, 23, who led three friends down the street into the house, moments before Baltimore firefighters arrived on the scene about 10:30 a.m. Bicklin managed to rescue two of his nephews before jumping from the second story, his fall through the black smoke broken by his friends below.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | February 28, 1991
Ken Kwapis and Marisa Silver, who co-directed ''He said, She Said,'' the most recent film to be shot in Baltimore, said they were aware that their movie is long for a comedy. It runs 115 minutes. ''We know that the movie comedy, as was the rule in the '30s, is supposed to end at 90 minutes, but we felt that our film was personal at core, that it was more a study of character than it was a comedy, so we didn't think we had to limit the movie to 90 minutes,'' said Kwapis. ''The film is really about two people communicating with each other.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | February 28, 1991
Ken Kwapis and Marisa Silver, who co-directed ''He said, She Said,'' the most recent film to be shot in Baltimore, said they were aware that their movie is long for a comedy. It runs 115 minutes. ''We know that the movie comedy, as was the rule in the '30s, is supposed to end at 90 minutes, but we felt that our film was personal at core, that it was more a study of character than it was a comedy, so we didn't think we had to limit the movie to 90 minutes,'' said Kwapis. ''The film is really about two people communicating with each other.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 11, 1991
'Awakenings'Starring Robin Williams and Robert De Niro.Directed by Penny Marshall.Released by Columbia.Rated PG-13.*** 1/2 "Awakenings" is about a man who goes to sleep one night and leaves a wake-up call not for the next morning but the next decade.Dramatizing a medical mystery story out of neurologist Oliver Sacks' book of the same title, it watches as a concerned young doctor manages to coax a ward of encephalitis victims out of their perpetual snoozes and back to a life of sorts.Robin Williams, at his most muted, plays a vaguely fictionalized version of Sacks, here called Dr. Malcolm Sayers, a neurological researcher with a profound horror of actual life and real people.
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