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By Jacalyn Carfagno and Jacalyn Carfagno,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | April 28, 1992
LEXINGTON, Ky. It was almost 20 years ago when a writer wondered why Penny Chenery got more television time than Indira Gandhi. The answer was simple: Secretariat.As Arazi has proved again, few phenomena turn the media world on its axis like the promise of a superhorse. Life changes for the humans living inside the vortex."It creates a great deal of pressure because everybody wants to know what you're doing with your horse every minute," Chenery said, recalling the year her family's Meadow Stable raced Secretariat to the Triple Crown.
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By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2012
Secretariat's legend hardly needs bolstering. But, his supporters feel, the race he ran on the third Saturday in May at Pimlico back in 1973 does require revisiting. The Maryland Racing Commission agrees, and will consider a proposal to change Secretariat's Preakness time during its meeting next week. At issue is whether the colt had set a track record - as he had already done at the Kentucky Derby and would do at the Belmont. While hardcore racing fans have long felt that the strapping chestnut colt did, indeed, run the fastest Preakness to date, supporters - including owner Penny Chenery and Maryland Jockey Club president Tom Chuckas - are seeking to have the record officially changed as the 40th anniversary of his Triple Crown win nears.
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FEATURES
May 3, 1992
There was this lightning move, all-powerful, by Secretariat the first time he came past the grandstand and glided into the clubhouse turn."There was this great leap forward which was incredible to see," remembers his most attentive admirer and owner, Penny Chenery (formerly Tweedy), now in Kentucky. "It reinforced for all of us how much natural ability he had. This was proven so many times but in the Preakness it was different. I'm often asked about his 31-length victory in the Belmont Stakes three weeks later.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2010
Grant Whitacre's acting career began with a scribbled phone number on the back of a racing program. It almost ended there, too. The 25-year-old jockey, who grew up in Howard County and graduated from Atholton, was getting dressed in the jockeys' room at Laurel Park in August. As he was putting his clothes on, he noticed a piece of paper stuck to the wall. It was a casting call for jockeys interested in auditioning for roles in a Disney movie about legendary Triple Crown winner Secretariat.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2012
Secretariat's legend hardly needs bolstering. But, his supporters feel, the race he ran on the third Saturday in May at Pimlico back in 1973 does require revisiting. The Maryland Racing Commission agrees, and will consider a proposal to change Secretariat's Preakness time during its meeting next week. At issue is whether the colt had set a track record - as he had already done at the Kentucky Derby and would do at the Belmont. While hardcore racing fans have long felt that the strapping chestnut colt did, indeed, run the fastest Preakness to date, supporters - including owner Penny Chenery and Maryland Jockey Club president Tom Chuckas - are seeking to have the record officially changed as the 40th anniversary of his Triple Crown win nears.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2010
Grant Whitacre's acting career began with a scribbled phone number on the back of a racing program. It almost ended there, too. The 25-year-old jockey, who grew up in Howard County and graduated from Atholton, was getting dressed in the jockeys' room at Laurel Park in August. As he was putting his clothes on, he noticed a piece of paper stuck to the wall. It was a casting call for jockeys interested in auditioning for roles in a Disney movie about legendary Triple Crown winner Secretariat.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1998
Twenty-five years ago, Secretariat won the Preakness, but lost a protest denying him the track record.Now, there's a move ahoof to reopen the case. Joe De Francis, owner of Pimlico Race Course, yesterday appealed to the Maryland Racing Commission to review tapes of the race to verify Secretariat's time -- and possibly rewrite history."
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1998
On his way to what his owner and trainer hope are record career earnings, Skip Away brings "Skippy Tour '98" to Baltimore on Saturday as part of Pimlico Special, fan-appreciation and Secretariat-commemorative day at Pimlico.Owned by Carolyn Hine, a native of Highlandtown, and trained by her husband, Sonny, the massive gray Skip Away -- whom the Hines lovingly call "Skippy" -- has earned $7,356,360. The $450,000 winner's share of the Pimlico Special's $750,000 purse would move Skip Away closer to Cigar's all-time earnings record of $9,999,815.
TRAVEL
By Theresa Sintetos, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2013
Dewey Beach, Del. Delaware Music Festival Four stages, 22 bands, no cover charge - and did we mention it's at the beach? If this sounds like fun, head to the Delaware Music Festival. Since 2003, this festival has showcased performances by some of Delaware's best bands. Enjoy dancing, singing and a preview of summer fun all weekend at the Rusty Rudder. The Delaware Music Festival begins Friday, March 29, at 9 p.m. and continues until 1 a.m. March 31. The event at the Rust Rudder is free to the public.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | March 7, 1993
Literally thousands of photographs were taken of Secretariat in 1973, the year the late great horse won the Triple Crown.He was on the cover of Time, Newsweek and Sports Illustrated.But when the horse's owner, Penny Chenery, recently flipped through her scrapbooks looking for one definitive pose of the animal, she chose a picture shot in the Notebookpost parade of the Preakness taken by Jimmy McCue, photographer for the Maryland Jockey Club."It's just a wonderful photo," Chenery said.She wants to reproduce McCue's picture on a poster she plans to issue this spring to commemorate the 20th anniversary of Secretariat's Triple Crown sweep.
FEATURES
May 3, 1992
There was this lightning move, all-powerful, by Secretariat the first time he came past the grandstand and glided into the clubhouse turn."There was this great leap forward which was incredible to see," remembers his most attentive admirer and owner, Penny Chenery (formerly Tweedy), now in Kentucky. "It reinforced for all of us how much natural ability he had. This was proven so many times but in the Preakness it was different. I'm often asked about his 31-length victory in the Belmont Stakes three weeks later.
SPORTS
By Jacalyn Carfagno and Jacalyn Carfagno,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | April 28, 1992
LEXINGTON, Ky. It was almost 20 years ago when a writer wondered why Penny Chenery got more television time than Indira Gandhi. The answer was simple: Secretariat.As Arazi has proved again, few phenomena turn the media world on its axis like the promise of a superhorse. Life changes for the humans living inside the vortex."It creates a great deal of pressure because everybody wants to know what you're doing with your horse every minute," Chenery said, recalling the year her family's Meadow Stable raced Secretariat to the Triple Crown.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 29, 1998
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- When the connections of the horses pick their post positions today for the 124th Kentucky Derby -- the first time that has ever happened -- they will vie for 15 or 16 slots in the starting gate.That appears to be the size of the field after four horses on the fence dropped off: Nite Dreamer, Heart Surgeon, Voyamerican and Maryland-bred Smolderin Heart. The D. Wayne Lukas-trained Yarrow Brae remained a possibility.The Derby horses for 1998, in order of likely betting preference, are: Indian Charlie, Halory Hunter, Favorite Trick, Cape Town, Real Quiet, Victory Gallop, Artax, Old Trieste, Parade Ground, Chilito, Hanuman Highway, Rock and Roll, Robinwould, Basic Trainee and Nationalore.
NEWS
By Steve Davidowitz | May 10, 1998
It is rare for officials in any sport to rectify a lingering, embarrassing mistake. It is even rarer when a silver-lined opportunity presents itself to correct the error, especially when it would benefit everyone connected to the sport.That is precisely the opportunity Maryland racing officials have this week as they salute the 25th anniversary of Secretariat's spectacular Triple Crown sweep in conjunction with the 123rd running of the Preakness.You see, 25 years ago, while the great horse was winning the hearts of millions in the Kentucky Derby, Preakness and Belmont Stakes, Maryland racing officials failed to honor him with their best effort - robbed him, in fact, of the singular most amazing feat in Triple Crown history.
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