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Pennsylvania Station

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NEWS
May 30, 1993
Passenger trains and stations are making a slow comeback.Washington's historic Union Station, since its renovation a few years back, has experienced a spectacular rebirth as a railroad terminal and shopping mall. In New York City, Amtrak is dreaming of a $315 million scheme to duplicate that success by moving its Penn Station from Madison Square Garden to the neo-classic General Post Office building on Eighth Avenue and 31st Street.Nothing as grandiose is happening in Baltimore. But the whole Mount Royal area is going to get a boost when a new 550-car garage is built under Pennsylvania Station and a grand plaza is created to improve vehicle and pedestrian access from Charles and St. Paul streets.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
Robert J. "Chief" Hunter, a career railroader who retired from Amtrak, died of heart failure Wednesday at Little Flower Manor nursing home in Darby, Pa. The former Lutherville resident was 91. The son of Robert Hunter, a shipyard worker, and Delia Hunter, a homemaker, Robert Joseph Hunter was born and raised in Philadelphia, where he graduated from West Catholic High School for Boys in 1941. He earned a bachelor's degree from LaSalle University and served in the Navy in the Pacific.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2011
The doors of Baltimore's new Union Station, now Pennsylvania Station, swung open a century ago this week to welcome enthusiastic crowds of Baltimoreans, travelers and gawkers alike. Its completion was considered a great civic triumph after years of agitation from Baltimoreans, both prominent and humble, and newspapers calling for a new station that was worthy of the city. The present station, the third on the site, was constructed of granite, terra cotta and built on a structural steel frame.
NEWS
January 3, 2014
That was a good editorial on the expansion of MARC commuter rail service, but I have to echo the sentiment of some of my fellow MARC monthly ticket holders at the loss of our access to Amtrak on the weekends ( "Weekends on the MARC," Jan. 2). Amtrak used to honor MARC monthly tickets on selected Amtrak trains between Washington and Baltimore on weekends. While the Maryland Transit Administration paid for this access, it seems unfortunate the MTA couldn't have at least negotiated a "step up" fare option where these ticket holders could pay a little extra and ride an express train between D.C. and Baltimore (Amtrak only makes two stops)
NEWS
August 19, 1997
An article in Sunday's editions about the Central Light Rail Line extension into Pennsylvania Station did not correctly identify the former B & P Railroad as the Baltimore & Potomac.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 8/19/97
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | May 15, 2000
OK, George, figure out how to get the Million Mom vote. Sheila Dixon needs her day job because City Council president (A) is not fultime; (B) pays to little; (C) is not fulfilling or (D) goes nowhere on the career ladder. Choose one. With the city closing closing Charles Street there's as easy way to Pennsylvania Station. They just aren't saying what it is. Rudy G. proved one again the New York is still the soap opera capital of the nation.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | April 16, 1991
A nationwide freight rail strike tomorrow could halt service on two of the state's three Maryland Rail Commuter train lines and force 8,000 commuters to change their way to work, transportation officials warn.For 2,800 riders on the line from Baltimore's Camden Station to Union Station in Washington, the state will provide alternative train service, MARC officials say.Meanwhile, the Mass Transit Administration will provide bus service for 5,200 riders of the line from Washington to Brunswick in Western Maryland.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2004
City officials approved the sale of Baltimore's historic Railway Express building yesterday to developers who plan to put 30 loft-style apartments in the former parcel post office. Railway Express LLC will pay the city $1.2 million for the building at 1501 St. Paul St. under the deal approved by the Board of Estimates. The official purchase price is $2 million, but the city has granted an $800,000 credit toward that price because of environmental and structural problems with the building.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | November 24, 2001
A Woodlawn man and his sister who did not return home from Pennsylvania Station in Baltimore Wednesday night were found in separate states yesterday. David McIver, 74, was found by New York state troopers about 4 p.m. in his car on a highway about 100 miles north of New York City, said Cpl. Vickie Warehime, a police spokeswoman. His sister, Rose Jones, 67, was found in Stamford, Conn., about 9:30 p.m., Baltimore County police said. Police said they had no details on how Jones was found but said she was alive and well.
NEWS
October 18, 1993
Except for one taxicab company and its patrons, the Charles Street entrance to Pennsylvania Station is still a mess -- a dangerous mess. The construction of a badly needed 500-space parking garage immediately south of the station has created a hazardous situation. That's been the case for several months now. City officials have taken a couple of steps designed to ease the blockade around the station for arriving and departing passengers. More changes are in the works, but they may not be enough.
NEWS
January 1, 2014
The launch of regular Saturday and Sunday commuter train service between Baltimore and Washington on the MARC rail line in December may be one of the best things that's happened to Charm City in decades. It will make it easier for Baltimore's harbor attractions, sports stadiums, museums and theaters to attract visitors from the Washington area and give Baltimore residents comparably easy access to weekend amenities there. Perhaps more importantly, it helps make Baltimore more appealing to Washington-area workers as a lower-cost alternative for city living and could spur a new influx of residents into the city again.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | August 2, 2013
Grace Willis sat in her front parlor and told me that her neighborhood, sometimes called Barclay or Greater Greenmount, is "just a wonderful place to live. " She would know, since she has lived at the corner of 22nd and Barclay for most of her life. She is known to her neighbors as the woman who likes to walk. On a walk, she showed me one of the reasons her neighborhood is the place she wants it to be. In the past few weeks, as promised, a fine-looking row of homes has risen on 20th Street.
NEWS
March 18, 2013
When it was built a century ago, Baltimore's Pennsylvania Station was embraced as a new gateway to the city. The elaborate Beaux-Arts building announced Baltimore's significance to the nation and anticipated serving generations of travelers to come. Today, it remains an important passenger rail station, not only for Amtrak but for MARC commuter rail customers, most of whom are headed to and from the nation's capital. But its magnificent architecture suggests it's more historic than inviting.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2011
About 16 months from now, bicyclists will be able to ride from the Inner Harbor to Pennsylvania Station on a smooth path all their own. Little by little, crews working in the shadow of the Jones Falls Expressway are inching their way north, building a concrete and belgian-block median to separate four-wheel traffic from the two-wheel variety. The $3.5 million, state-funded segment of the Jones Falls Trail will start at Lee Street near the Baltimore Visitor Center, wrap around the Inner Harbor and follow the Fallsway to the train station.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2011
The doors of Baltimore's new Union Station, now Pennsylvania Station, swung open a century ago this week to welcome enthusiastic crowds of Baltimoreans, travelers and gawkers alike. Its completion was considered a great civic triumph after years of agitation from Baltimoreans, both prominent and humble, and newspapers calling for a new station that was worthy of the city. The present station, the third on the site, was constructed of granite, terra cotta and built on a structural steel frame.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 20, 2010
Milton H. "Mickey" Miller, 80, a retired commercial real estate broker and civic leader who ran a successful fundraising campaign for the Peabody Institute, died of congestive heart failure Nov. 12 at Sinai Hospital. The Pikesville resident was 80. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of J. Jefferson Miller, the Hecht department store executive who led downtown Baltimore's urban renewal development in the Charles Center. He was a 1948 Friends School graduate and earned a history degree at the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
January 21, 1992
Last year was a banner year for Mount Vernon, the neighborhood surrounding the city's premiere square. The Hackerman House was renovated to accommodate the Walters Art Gallery's Asian collection. The Waterloo Place apartments added the choice of spanking new residences to an area where historic town houses dominate. And the Peabody Institute began the conversion of three decrepit town houses in the 600 block of North Charles Street into an elderhostel for senior citizens taking music-related courses.
NEWS
June 13, 1992
COULD AMERICA'S love affair with the automobile be souring after all these years?Amtrak, the nation's long-distance passenger train operator, is betting more and more people will abandon gridlocked interstate highways in the 1990s and take trains instead.It is so confident that it is shopping for a new gateway station in New York, where the original Pennsylvania Station was torn down 30 years ago to make way for office towers and Madison Square Gardens."A station is the gateway to the rail service and the city it serves," an Amtrak spokesman said in confirming that the company is shopping for New York's sprawling General Post Office building at 33rd Street and Eighth Avenue.
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