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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2013
Dr. Ernest H. Hinrichs, a retired Ruxton dentist who was a lifelong model railroader and Pennsylvania Railroad buff, died Feb. 23 from complications of Alzheimer's disease at a Lewisburg, Pa., retirement community. He was 90. The son of a dentist and a homemaker, Ernest Henry Hinrichs was born in Baltimore and raised in Riderwood, where he watched the daily procession of Pennsylvania Railroad passenger and freight trains that passed through the community. After graduating from McDonogh School in 1940, he enrolled at the Johns Hopkins University, where he studied for two years before enlisting in the Army in 1942.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
Bernadette M. Ridenour, a homemaker and former stenographer, died Wednesday of dementia at Stella Maris Hospice. She was 88. The daughter of Louis and Elsie Intlekofer, German immigrant bakers, Bernadette Marie Intlekofer was born in Baltimore and raised on Federal Street in East Baltimore. After graduating from Catholic High School in 1944, in the school's second graduating class, she worked as a secretary for a Baltimore Insurance company. In 1947, she married William F. Ridenour, a World War II veteran who later was yardmaster of the old Pennsylvania Railroad's Bayview Yard in East Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2010
Francis R. Rahl Sr., a retired railroader who enjoyed spending his retirement years on Maryland's Eastern Shore, died Saturday of lung cancer at his son's Union Square home. He was 90. Mr. Rahl, the son of an electro-nickel plater and a homemaker, was born and raised in Greensburg, Pa. After graduating from Greensburg High School in 1937, he worked as an orderly at Greensburg Hospital and later at the Robertshaw Thermostat in Youngwood, Pa. He enlisted in the Army in 1942 and served as an operating room medic in a military hospital at Fort Wayne, Ind., until being discharged in 1946.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
Robert J. "Chief" Hunter, a career railroader who retired from Amtrak, died of heart failure Wednesday at Little Flower Manor nursing home in Darby, Pa. The former Lutherville resident was 91. The son of Robert Hunter, a shipyard worker, and Delia Hunter, a homemaker, Robert Joseph Hunter was born and raised in Philadelphia, where he graduated from West Catholic High School for Boys in 1941. He earned a bachelor's degree from LaSalle University and served in the Navy in the Pacific.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
Robert J. "Chief" Hunter, a career railroader who retired from Amtrak, died of heart failure Wednesday at Little Flower Manor nursing home in Darby, Pa. The former Lutherville resident was 91. The son of Robert Hunter, a shipyard worker, and Delia Hunter, a homemaker, Robert Joseph Hunter was born and raised in Philadelphia, where he graduated from West Catholic High School for Boys in 1941. He earned a bachelor's degree from LaSalle University and served in the Navy in the Pacific.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1997
In 1835, the first train to reach the nation's capital chugged into the city over the Baltimore and Washington Railroad, as the Washington branch of the Baltimore and Ohio was known then.However, there was probably no more spectacular train arrival in Washington than that of the Pennsylvania Railroad's Federal Express on Jan. 15, 1953.The Boston-Washington overnight train, No. 173, smashed a bumper post, plowed into the station concourse and stopped only after the locomotive fell through the crushed floor into the basement of Union Station.
NEWS
July 12, 1997
An article in yesterday's editions misidentified the railroad that used the York Road trestle in the mid-1920s; the Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad used the tracks.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 7/12/97
NEWS
June 2, 2008
The MA & PA Heritage Trail in Bel Air, which runs along the old Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad corridor, was built 10 years ago. Bikers, dog walkers and nature lovers frequent the path, which is now two miles longer, from Tollgate Road to Edgeley Grove. A "Trail-a-bration" will be held Saturday to mark the anniversary of the trail and celebrate the new addition. The event will be from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad was established in 1901 and ran from Baltimore York, Pa. It was 77 miles long and crossed 111 bridges.
NEWS
By Geoffrey W. Fielding | March 16, 1992
THE STORY OF THE NORTHERN CENTRAL RAILWAY. By Robert L. Gunnarsson. Greenberg Publishing Co., Sykesville. 189 pages. Illustrated. $39.95. WHEN Baltimore's new light rail line opens for business next month, it will run over a historic railroad right-of-way north of Baltimore, one which was surveyed more than 160 years ago.The route was used by the Baltimore and Susquehanna Railroad, chartered in 1828, which, in 1854, became the Northern Central Railway.As...
NEWS
August 28, 2005
The last Maryland and Pennsylvania Railroad passenger train stopped in Bel Air on August 31, 1954. Affectionately known as the Ma & Pa, the railroad connected Baltimore and York, Pa., over a circuitous 77 mile route. Its earliest predecessor, the Maryland Central Railroad, was chartered in Maryland in 1867 for the purpose of building a Baltimore to Philadelphia line via Bel Air and Conowingo but laid no track. The first actual construction on the route of the Ma & Pa began in Pennsylvania with the Peach Bottom Railway which completed a narrow gauge line from York through Red Lion and Delta to Peach Bottom on the Susquehanna River between 1873 and 1876.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
Charles W. "Chuck" Battenfeld Jr., a retired Canton Railroad Co. executive, died April 23 of heart failure at his Rodgers Forge home. He was 95. His wife of 70 years, Mary Jeannette Battenfeld, a homemaker and an accomplished seamstress, died four days later of Alzheimer's disease at College Manor Nursing Home in Lutherville. She was 92. The son of a carpet installer and a homemaker, Charles Wesley Battenfeld Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised in Govans. After graduating in 1936 from City College, he began his 44-year railroad career working as a yard checker for the Canton Railroad Co., an industrial railroad that once operated 39 miles of track in Baltimore and Baltimore County.
NEWS
SPECIAL TO THE AEGIS | April 11, 2014
The annual search is on for photos and other types of memorabilia relating to the Maryland and Pennsylvania Railroad and its narrow gauge predecessors. Members of the Old Line Museum in Delta, Pa., and other Ma & Pa buffs, collectively calling themselves the Maryland and Pennsylvania Railroad Gang, are soliciting donations of artifacts from the general public and collectors through April 27; however, any materials found after that date will still be gratefully accepted, according to Jerome Murphy, of Baldwin, who is once again leading the collection effort.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
George J. Voith, a retired CSX executive and noted rail and streetcar photographer who was a founding member of the Baltimore Streetcar Museum, died Monday of dementia at his Northwood home. He was 87. "George is one of the last of the original guys who founded the Baltimore Streetcar Museum. He was a wonderful fellow," said John O'Neil Jr., museum president. "I first met him when I joined the museum in 1971. He was a good mentor for young members, whom he took under his wing and he urged to take on more responsibilities," said Mr. O'Neil.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
For quite some time now, enthusiastic volunteers have been whacking brush, clearing debris and replacing ties and rails on the old Pennsylvania Railroad's Northern Central Division, one of the nation's most historic stretches of railroad, which courses 10 miles northward from New Freedom, Pa., to Hanover Junction. This work has been done under the guidance of Steam Into History Inc., a nonprofit that has returned the sights and sounds of steam railroading to York County just in time to observe the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg and Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
Charles T. Mahan Jr., who spent 75 years painstakingly documenting the Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad — better known as the Ma & Pa — that zig-zagged across Maryland from Baltimore to York, Pa., died Friday of kidney failure at Oak Crest Village. He was 88. "Every fan of the Ma & Pa will be eternally indebted to Charlie. He was a treasure," said Rudy Fischer, archivist of the Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad Historical Society. "He documented its rolling stock, narrow- and later standard-gauge days.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2013
Dr. Ernest H. Hinrichs, a retired Ruxton dentist who was a lifelong model railroader and Pennsylvania Railroad buff, died Feb. 23 from complications of Alzheimer's disease at a Lewisburg, Pa., retirement community. He was 90. The son of a dentist and a homemaker, Ernest Henry Hinrichs was born in Baltimore and raised in Riderwood, where he watched the daily procession of Pennsylvania Railroad passenger and freight trains that passed through the community. After graduating from McDonogh School in 1940, he enrolled at the Johns Hopkins University, where he studied for two years before enlisting in the Army in 1942.
NEWS
June 21, 1994
THE link between the Maryland and Pennsylvania Railroad -- better known around these parts as the famed Ma & Pa -- and academia is tenuous, at best.But writer Lawrence Biemiller valiantly made the attempt in an article for The Chronicle of Higher Education. The tie-in? The author of a 1963 book on the Ma & Pa is a former prof. Here are some excerpts, with a York, Pa., dateline:"To whatever extent this railroad really is famous, it's largely the doing of [George] Hilton, a retired economics professor from the University of California at Los Angeles.
NEWS
August 27, 2006
Last train service from Bel Air On Aug. 31, 1954, a train on the Maryland and Pennsylvania Railroad left Bel Air Station for the last time. Known affectionately as the "Ma and Pa," the railroad scaled back operations until 1959, when it folded, ending a railroad that during its 80 years of existence did much for the agricultural and economic development of Harford County. As early as 1867, a company was chartered to build a railroad from Baltimore to Philadelphia through Bel Air and crossing the river at Conowingo.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2013
William R. Smith, a career railroader who rose from coach cleaner to head the Canton Railroad Co. and was also a strong advocate for the port of Baltimore, died Saturday from complications of Parkinson's disease at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson. The longtime Ruxton resident was 83. "Bill was a mentor to me and I always appreciated the confidence he had in me," said John C. Magness, president and chief executive officer of the Canton Railroad Co. "He had a bit of an edge and like Earl Weaver, could be tough but he was always right.
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