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NEWS
By Mark Bomster | January 21, 1992
The Supreme Court's decision to review Pennsylvania's abortion law could prove a watershed, according to local abortion opponents and abortion rights activists.Maryland abortion activists on both sides say the case could help shape abortion laws around the nation at a time when the future of the court's 1973 Roe vs. Wade precedent, setting a constitutional right to abortion, is seriously in doubt.Roger J. Stenson, executive director of Maryland Right to Life, an anti-abortion group, said that, even without overturning Roe, the court could uphold the Pennsylvania law,putting its seal of approval on similar moves by other states to limit abortion.
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FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
Due to the government shutdown, progress on the Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA) -- which would ban discrimination in hiring based on gender identity or sexual orientation -- has stalled. But when things get back to normal in Washington, LGBT rights advocates seeking to get the act passed by the end of the year now have numbers on their side. A poll conducted by a former Mitt Romney data guy Alex Lundry and released Monday by Politico shows a firm majority of Americans support a federal law that would protect LGBT employees in their workplaces.
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NEWS
December 16, 1992
The Supreme Court has refused to review a lower court ruling upholding Mississippi's abortion control law. The justices obviously agreed with the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals, which had said the law's waiting period requirement, which was the principal point of contention, was "substantially identical" to Pennsylvania's law. The Supreme Court upheld Pennsylvania's law last summer.In that ruling, the court said that women have a constitutional right to have an abortion, but states may regulate abortion as long as regulation places no "undue burden" on a woman.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | January 18, 1997
PHILADELPHIA -- Conrail stockholders, clearly looking for the most money, yesterday emphatically rejected a proposal that would have allowed CSX Corp. to proceed with its takeover of the huge railroad.Voting for the first time in the heated takeover fight, Conrail shareholders defeated a plan proposed by Conrail's board of directors to "opt out" of a Pennsylvania law that prohibits two-tiered takeover offers such as CSX's $104 a share cash-and-stock, or $9.3 billion, deal.The outcome was a victory for Norfolk Southern Corp.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 8, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Pennsylvania got clear permission from Supreme Court Justice David H. Souter late last night to start enforcing its anti-abortion laws, on the bookssince 1988 and 1989 but never put into effect.In a six-page opinion issued about an hour before midnight, Mr. Souter said he thought the state laws might put a burden on women's right to abortion, but he said a federal appeals court in Philadelphia was right in refusing earlier this month to postpone the laws any further.Enforcement of the law, to begin within a few days, is expected to affect about 50,000 women a year in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
April 21, 1992
With the drums of combat in Buffalo between abortion opponents and supporters sounding ominously in the background, the Supreme Court tomorrow will take up a case that offers it the opportunity to overturn Roe vs. Wade, the landmark 1973 abortion rights decision.Six years ago this spring, the court overturned a somewhat similar Pennsylvania law. In so doing, Justice Harry Blackmun reaffirmed what he had written in Roe. A woman's right to an abortion is fundamental and constitutional, involving individual liberty, and no state may regulate that except for a compelling state interest.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 8, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Pennsylvania got clear permission from Supreme Court Justice David H. Souter late last night to start enforcing its anti-abortion laws, on the books since 1988 and 1989 but never put into effect.In a six-page opinion issued about an hour before midnight, Justice Souter said he thought the state laws might put a burden on women's right to abortion, but he said a federal appeals court in Philadelphia was right in refusing earlier this month to postpone the laws any further.Enforcement of the law, to begin within a few days, is expected to affect about 50,000 women a year in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
April 23, 1992
These are the three lawyers in the abortion rights hearing at the Supreme Court yesterday:Kathryn Kolbert, 40, of Philadelphia: Represents five abortion clinics and a Pittsburgh doctor, challenging two state anti-abortion laws. State coordinating counsel on reproductive health law, American Civil Liberties Union. Second appearance before the court. In the first, in 1986, she won a 5-4 ruling that went further than any prior decision to uphold abortion rights; that case involved an earlier challenge to a Pennsylvania law containing some of the same kinds of restrictions that are in the new laws under review.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 8, 1994
WASHINGTON -- After more than five years of waiting, Pennsylvania gained the authority last night to begin enforcing its anti-abortion laws, but other states with similar laws may not benefit from the Supreme Court order that cleared the way for Pennsylvania.Supreme Court Justice David H. Souter, in a six-page opinion issued shortly before 11 p.m., gave Pennsylvania permission to put into effect in a matter of days abortion limits that it had adopted in 1988 and 1989.But, Justice Souter made clear, his action was based solely on the special case of the Pennsylvania law. Moreover, he stressed that abortion rights forces "are free to challenge similar restrictions in other jurisdictions."
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
Due to the government shutdown, progress on the Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA) -- which would ban discrimination in hiring based on gender identity or sexual orientation -- has stalled. But when things get back to normal in Washington, LGBT rights advocates seeking to get the act passed by the end of the year now have numbers on their side. A poll conducted by a former Mitt Romney data guy Alex Lundry and released Monday by Politico shows a firm majority of Americans support a federal law that would protect LGBT employees in their workplaces.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 8, 1994
WASHINGTON -- After more than five years of waiting, Pennsylvania gained the authority last night to begin enforcing its anti-abortion laws, but other states with similar laws may not benefit from the Supreme Court order that cleared the way for Pennsylvania.Supreme Court Justice David H. Souter, in a six-page opinion issued shortly before 11 p.m., gave Pennsylvania permission to put into effect in a matter of days abortion limits that it had adopted in 1988 and 1989.But, Justice Souter made clear, his action was based solely on the special case of the Pennsylvania law. Moreover, he stressed that abortion rights forces "are free to challenge similar restrictions in other jurisdictions."
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 8, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Pennsylvania got clear permission from Supreme Court Justice David H. Souter late last night to start enforcing its anti-abortion laws, on the bookssince 1988 and 1989 but never put into effect.In a six-page opinion issued about an hour before midnight, Mr. Souter said he thought the state laws might put a burden on women's right to abortion, but he said a federal appeals court in Philadelphia was right in refusing earlier this month to postpone the laws any further.Enforcement of the law, to begin within a few days, is expected to affect about 50,000 women a year in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 8, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Pennsylvania got clear permission from Supreme Court Justice David H. Souter late last night to start enforcing its anti-abortion laws, on the books since 1988 and 1989 but never put into effect.In a six-page opinion issued about an hour before midnight, Justice Souter said he thought the state laws might put a burden on women's right to abortion, but he said a federal appeals court in Philadelphia was right in refusing earlier this month to postpone the laws any further.Enforcement of the law, to begin within a few days, is expected to affect about 50,000 women a year in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
December 16, 1992
The Supreme Court has refused to review a lower court ruling upholding Mississippi's abortion control law. The justices obviously agreed with the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals, which had said the law's waiting period requirement, which was the principal point of contention, was "substantially identical" to Pennsylvania's law. The Supreme Court upheld Pennsylvania's law last summer.In that ruling, the court said that women have a constitutional right to have an abortion, but states may regulate abortion as long as regulation places no "undue burden" on a woman.
NEWS
April 23, 1992
These are the three lawyers in the abortion rights hearing at the Supreme Court yesterday:Kathryn Kolbert, 40, of Philadelphia: Represents five abortion clinics and a Pittsburgh doctor, challenging two state anti-abortion laws. State coordinating counsel on reproductive health law, American Civil Liberties Union. Second appearance before the court. In the first, in 1986, she won a 5-4 ruling that went further than any prior decision to uphold abortion rights; that case involved an earlier challenge to a Pennsylvania law containing some of the same kinds of restrictions that are in the new laws under review.
NEWS
April 21, 1992
With the drums of combat in Buffalo between abortion opponents and supporters sounding ominously in the background, the Supreme Court tomorrow will take up a case that offers it the opportunity to overturn Roe vs. Wade, the landmark 1973 abortion rights decision.Six years ago this spring, the court overturned a somewhat similar Pennsylvania law. In so doing, Justice Harry Blackmun reaffirmed what he had written in Roe. A woman's right to an abortion is fundamental and constitutional, involving individual liberty, and no state may regulate that except for a compelling state interest.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | January 18, 1997
PHILADELPHIA -- Conrail stockholders, clearly looking for the most money, yesterday emphatically rejected a proposal that would have allowed CSX Corp. to proceed with its takeover of the huge railroad.Voting for the first time in the heated takeover fight, Conrail shareholders defeated a plan proposed by Conrail's board of directors to "opt out" of a Pennsylvania law that prohibits two-tiered takeover offers such as CSX's $104 a share cash-and-stock, or $9.3 billion, deal.The outcome was a victory for Norfolk Southern Corp.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Matthew Hay Brown and Jennifer Skalka and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporters | October 22, 2006
As a teenager, Michael S. Steele was a natural on the stage. Tall and handsome, with a dazzling smile, he won parts in high school, college and summer-stock theater that allowed him to be the central figure, the star. But even when he failed to land the leads, Steele managed to make himself visible. "Somehow, he always found his way to the front," says Jim Mumford, Steele's former drama director at Archbishop Carroll High School in Washington. He was "so enthusiastic," Mumford says, "that, of course, you let him stay up there."
NEWS
By Mark Bomster | January 21, 1992
The Supreme Court's decision to review Pennsylvania's abortion law could prove a watershed, according to local abortion opponents and abortion rights activists.Maryland abortion activists on both sides say the case could help shape abortion laws around the nation at a time when the future of the court's 1973 Roe vs. Wade precedent, setting a constitutional right to abortion, is seriously in doubt.Roger J. Stenson, executive director of Maryland Right to Life, an anti-abortion group, said that, even without overturning Roe, the court could uphold the Pennsylvania law,putting its seal of approval on similar moves by other states to limit abortion.
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