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NEWS
September 18, 2014
John Harding, a maglev scientist from Palm Springs, Calif., blithely asserts that "the Amtrak station" (it's called Penn Station, Hon) should be moved downtown "for the sake of local commuters" ( "Maglev outperforms other trains," Sept. 16). It's a sure bet he has never conferred either with people who use Penn Station who are not all commuters or with those who would be affected either by its abandonment or by the disruption and expense associated with constructing a new one and the tracks leading to it. Good urban planning begins with respect for existing structures and communities.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Justin George and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Police, fire and hazardous materials crews responded to Baltimore's Penn Station Monday evening after a white powdery substance was found on a train inbound from Washington. Baltimore Fire Capt. Roman Clark said the powder found on the 5:05 p.m. MARC train from Washington was tested and found to be non-hazardous. A conductor making an announcement in D.C. rapped a faulty microphone against a wall, causing the powder to fall. Hazmat crews were then alerted, Clark said. Officials did not identify the substance.
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FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | michael.dresser@baltsun.com | March 22, 2010
It's a whole lot quieter in Penn Station these days - no whirring sounds, no clickety-clack of an old-fashioned, mechanical signboard bringing the news that your train is 20 minutes late. In place of the iconic board above the main desk at Baltimore's Amtrak station, there now hangs a large digital board that works intermittently as it undergoes testing. For live information, passengers depend on two small temporary digital screens - miniature versions of what travelers might see listing arrivals and departures at an airport.
NEWS
September 18, 2014
John Harding, a maglev scientist from Palm Springs, Calif., blithely asserts that "the Amtrak station" (it's called Penn Station, Hon) should be moved downtown "for the sake of local commuters" ( "Maglev outperforms other trains," Sept. 16). It's a sure bet he has never conferred either with people who use Penn Station who are not all commuters or with those who would be affected either by its abandonment or by the disruption and expense associated with constructing a new one and the tracks leading to it. Good urban planning begins with respect for existing structures and communities.
NEWS
March 22, 2010
I will not be sorry to see the mechanical schedule board at Penn Station replaced, and I shall sbsolutely rejoice that vocal announcements are going digital ("At Penn Station, clack-clack no more," March 22). It has been nearly impossible to understand train announcements because of echoes and the unintelligable enunciation of the staff. Whirring floor fans in hot weather did not help, either. The final straw has been the rude and condescending attitude of the representatives if one dared ask a question.
NEWS
March 18, 2013
When it was built a century ago, Baltimore's Pennsylvania Station was embraced as a new gateway to the city. The elaborate Beaux-Arts building announced Baltimore's significance to the nation and anticipated serving generations of travelers to come. Today, it remains an important passenger rail station, not only for Amtrak but for MARC commuter rail customers, most of whom are headed to and from the nation's capital. But its magnificent architecture suggests it's more historic than inviting.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2012
A 66-year-old Towson man was struck and killed by a vehicle near Penn Station on Thursday morning, city police said. Terrance Walbert, of the 200 block of Dumbarton Road, had stepped off of a city bus in the 1600 block of Maryland Avenue when he began to cross the street, police said. A 1999 Ford Mustang traveling south unsuccessfully swerved to avoid hitting him, and Walbert struck the windshield and was thrown into the roadway. Police said the driver of the Mustang, a 32-year-old man, did not appear to be at fault and no charges are pending.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
A $1 million project to renovate bathrooms at Penn Station in Baltimore, in part to make them accessible to individuals with disabilities, has been completed ahead of schedule, local transportation officials announced Wednesday. The joint project between Amtrak and the Maryland Transit Administration began in July 2013. Amtrak operates Acela Express, Northeast Regional and short- and long-distance services out of the station. The state is "making significant investments to make transit more accessible, convenient and enjoyable for more people," said MTA Administrator Robert Smith in a statement.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
Around 10 a.m. Thursday an Amtrak contractor struck a 24-inch gas main on the property of Penn Station in Baltimore, a utility spokeswoman said. Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. responded to the scene and were continuing work on shutting off the gas line at around 2 p.m., said Rachael Lighty. Only buildings on the Penn Station property are expected to lose gas service because of the leak, she said, but BGE is having employees canvass the area to ensure no residential gas users have lost service.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2010
The Baltimore Department of Transportation will install a long-sought traffic signal and crosswalk next year on Charles Street near Penn Station to help pedestrians cross the busy northbound street, the city's traffic chief said Tuesday. Traffic division chief Randall Scott said the new signal at Charles and Oliver streets will remain green to northbound Charles Street traffic until a pedestrian pushes a button indicating a desire to cross. The new signal, which will be installed north of Mount Royal Avenue and south of the entrance ramp to Interstate 83, is expected to be in operation as early as February but no later than May, Scott said.
NEWS
August 8, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's plan to beautify the approaches to Baltimore for visitors arriving by rail may seem like a triumph of style over substance in efforts to revitalize the city's image. But first impressions really do count, and the mayor is right that it doesn't have to be the depressing landscape of boarded-up houses and trash-strewn yards that greets rail passengers today. In the grand scheme of things, sprucing up the route along which travelers pass as they enter the city won't by itself transform Baltimore's fortunes.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
A collapsed house. An abandoned warehouse furred with vines. Block after block of vacant homes, shattered windows framing blackness. Then, the tunnel and the train platform. The mix of shuttered industrial spaces and faded neighborhoods that flank the tracks leading to Penn Station are some of Baltimore's bleakest landscapes. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake wants to change the view for the 2 million people who use Penn Station each year - and improve Baltimore's image. She plans to formally unveil today an elegant billboard-sized sign that is visible from the train platform.
NEWS
By Charlie Duff | July 16, 2014
The reactions triggered by the Board of Estimates' recent approval of a study of the feasibility of converting St. Paul and Calvert streets back to two-way traffic have demonstrated that this city is at a crossroads. Policies are changing and new ideas are emerging, yet there is still a significant obstacle ahead of us: challenging outdated mentalities. Forty years of car-centric urban planning have turned Baltimore into one of the most congested areas in the country, but some still argue that solutions lie in rush-hour parking restrictions and signal optimization.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
Robert J. "Chief" Hunter, a career railroader who retired from Amtrak, died of heart failure Wednesday at Little Flower Manor nursing home in Darby, Pa. The former Lutherville resident was 91. The son of Robert Hunter, a shipyard worker, and Delia Hunter, a homemaker, Robert Joseph Hunter was born and raised in Philadelphia, where he graduated from West Catholic High School for Boys in 1941. He earned a bachelor's degree from LaSalle University and served in the Navy in the Pacific.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
When you paint on a wall in the middle of the city, people want to talk to you. They want to tell you how they would have painted things differently, choosing a different shade of green or a different subject entirely. They want to know why you're there. They want to tell you their stories. "You did that, man?" they ask. "That is all right. " For six days last month, the artist known as Gaia painted on the side of a Korean rice cake factory in the 2000 block of N. Charles St. in Station North.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
When you paint on a wall in the middle of the city, people want to talk to you. They want to tell you how they would have painted things differently, choosing a different shade of green, or a different subject entirely. They want to know why you're there. They want to tell you their stories. "You did that, man?" they ask. "That is allllright. " For six days last week, the artist known as Gaia painted on the side of a Korean rice cake factory in the 2000 block of N. Charles St. in Station North.
NEWS
September 16, 2011
Baltimore should take pride in the celebration of Penn Station's 100th anniversary. What a radical contrast one experiences approaching this architectural gem when confronted by the hideous man/woman statue. This eyesore is inappropriate and an embarrassment to our city which is desperately trying to improve its image. At a time when recycling unwanted metal is strongly encouraged, this statue is a prime candidate. Hobart V. Fowlkes
NEWS
October 15, 1990
With the Board of Estimates having given its blessings, design work on a new entrance plaza and underground parking garage at Pennsylvania Station can finally begin. When the much-talked about $15.2 million project is finished, it will provide a focal point for improvements taking place in the area of Mount Royal Avenue.The bad news is that the 550-garage is likely to be too small the day it opens because two nearby open-air lots will be closed. Meanwhile, Amtrak passenger volume is steadily increasing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2014
The walls of Station North - already home to towering geometric designs, assorted jungle cats and one giant dove - are set to get even more colorful in the coming weeks as Baltimore street artist Gaia reprises his popular mural project. Artists began work on the newest murals Sunday. The Open Walls Project 2 will run until June. In 2012, Gaia, an alumnus of the Maryland Institute College of Art , and collaborators from across the globe launched the Open Walls Project, installing roughly 15 building-sized murals through out Station North.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
The Maryland Transit Administration will increase capacity on weekend MARC trains between Baltimore and Washington beginning Saturday, citing growing ridership on the months-old service. The Penn Line service saw its most weekend riders to date this past weekend, on March 8 and 9, when 6,530 passengers traveled between Baltimore and its neighbor to the south, said Paulette Austrich, a MTA spokeswoman. The MTA first began weekend MARC service between Baltimore's Penn Station and Washington's Union Station on the first Saturday of December, offering nine three-car trains on Saturdays and six three-car trains on Sundays.
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