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Penmanship

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NEWS
January 13, 2013
My only comment on President Barack Obama's pick for Treasury Secretary is that Jack Lew should try to improve his penmanship ("Treasury pick seen as right for budget fights," Jan. 10). His signature looks like a stretched out slinky toy. I'm not sure I want to see his scrawl on all my dollar bills. Rosalind Heid, Baltimore
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NEWS
August 21, 2014
My oh my, schools have cut out handwriting. What do they think they are doing? How are children going to sign their name? Technology has brought many changes to our lives, but it doesn't mean we can dismiss handwriting, a basic skill. Especially in business, we must sign our names while we open a checking or savings account, sign for a loan or mortgage and any receipt must be signed when using a credit card - the preferred choice of payment for today. A waitress comes to your table and writes your order with a pen and paper, and then goes to the computer to put the order into the kitchen.
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NEWS
August 21, 2014
My oh my, schools have cut out handwriting. What do they think they are doing? How are children going to sign their name? Technology has brought many changes to our lives, but it doesn't mean we can dismiss handwriting, a basic skill. Especially in business, we must sign our names while we open a checking or savings account, sign for a loan or mortgage and any receipt must be signed when using a credit card - the preferred choice of payment for today. A waitress comes to your table and writes your order with a pen and paper, and then goes to the computer to put the order into the kitchen.
NEWS
January 13, 2013
My only comment on President Barack Obama's pick for Treasury Secretary is that Jack Lew should try to improve his penmanship ("Treasury pick seen as right for budget fights," Jan. 10). His signature looks like a stretched out slinky toy. I'm not sure I want to see his scrawl on all my dollar bills. Rosalind Heid, Baltimore
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 3, 2005
Stuck at home one snowy afternoon a few weeks ago, Talia Sheridan, a Mount Washington homemaker, found herself leafing through some old notebooks kept by her son, Chris, when he was in elementary school. Delighted by Chris' carefully formed letters, Sheridan recalled, "he had a teacher then who thought penmanship was terribly important. She was even fussy about where he put the tail on an a." Making such memories slightly bittersweet, however, was a realization that her son's letters were no longer given such careful attention.
BUSINESS
By Diane E. Lewis and Diane E. Lewis,BOSTON GLOBE | February 3, 1997
Here's one for those who think penmanship no longer matters in the age of word processors and electronic mail.Cognex Inc., the Massachusetts manufacturer of ultrahigh-tech "machine vision" equipment, makes all applicants for managerial positions take a handwriting test. "We want to know whether an applicant can fit into our corporate culture," explains JoAnn Woodyard, human resources director.Olsten Corp., the Melville, N.Y., temporary work agency, uses handwriting analysis to screen all managerial and sales applicants for such traits as honesty and dependability.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | January 23, 1992
It's National Handwriting Day. Do you know where your penmanship has gone?If you're like most of us, those precise t's and p's and capital Q's you learned in grammar school disappeared years ago, replaced by a scrawl even you can hardly decipher some days."
NEWS
By Staff Report | April 30, 1993
Arthur P. Myers, a Baltimore handwriting expert who worke for the defense in the Lindbergh baby kidnapping case, died Tuesday of cancer at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was 95.Mr. Myers, a Northeast Baltimore resident described by a reporter in 1981 as a "very polite, very dignified, wispy little gentleman," was still doing many styles of calligraphy on invitations at the time of his death and last testified in court about two years ago.And while he testified in 600 criminal and civil cases from Massachusetts to Washington, he never testified in his most famous case.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | July 17, 2005
A COUPLE OF CLEVER stay-at-home mothers have found a tiny spot in the great, big world of free enterprise just big enough for them -- a thank-you-note-writing service. Before you lament the decline of etiquette in the 21st century, consider the plight of the poor bride with a 250-person guest list, a job to return to after her honeymoon and an Aunt Sarah who is going to start hinting that neither she nor her friends received a thank-you as soon as the newlyweds get off the plane from Cancun.
NEWS
December 19, 1999
25 years ago: On June 12 and 13, 1976, the Mt. Airy Community will celebrate the 200th anniversary of he American Revolution.While still 18 months away, these dates chosen over holidays such as July Fourth and Memorial Day are going to be educational, entertaining and memorable if the commission, now well into the planning stages, gets the cooperation of every citizen, business, school, civic and service club. - the Community Reporter, Dec. 20, 1974.50 years ago: The appeal for a War Memorial for this city for many years came to a climax when our hustling mayor and Common Council decided that further delay would cause more talk and announced the purchase of a suitable and appropriate memorial to pay tribute to the honor and sacrifice of the fine men and women of Westminster who saw service in the armed forces of the United States during all wars.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | July 17, 2005
A COUPLE OF CLEVER stay-at-home mothers have found a tiny spot in the great, big world of free enterprise just big enough for them -- a thank-you-note-writing service. Before you lament the decline of etiquette in the 21st century, consider the plight of the poor bride with a 250-person guest list, a job to return to after her honeymoon and an Aunt Sarah who is going to start hinting that neither she nor her friends received a thank-you as soon as the newlyweds get off the plane from Cancun.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 3, 2005
Stuck at home one snowy afternoon a few weeks ago, Talia Sheridan, a Mount Washington homemaker, found herself leafing through some old notebooks kept by her son, Chris, when he was in elementary school. Delighted by Chris' carefully formed letters, Sheridan recalled, "he had a teacher then who thought penmanship was terribly important. She was even fussy about where he put the tail on an a." Making such memories slightly bittersweet, however, was a realization that her son's letters were no longer given such careful attention.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 11, 2001
MAINTAINING attractive, legible handwriting might seem obsolete in a world dominated by computers. But Lauryn Fazenbaker, an 11-year-old pupil at Charles Carroll Elementary School, knows otherwise. Her proper penmanship recently won state-level recognition from Zaner-Bloser, the nation's leading publisher of handwriting texts. "If I wrote sloppy, no one would know what I had to say, if I had something really important to say," said Lauryn, who will receive a $500 savings bond, an engraved pen and an award plaque for her achievement.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2000
THE CAP ON the upper-case J is back. That's a good thing. Opinion about the cursive capital Q is mixed, but no one likes the simplified upper-case M. It's Thursday noon at the National Catholic Educational Association convention, and a group of teachers from St. John the Evangelist School in northern Baltimore County is discussing arcane details of handwriting over Caesar salad at a downtown hotel. These teachers prove that handwriting lives, despite the computer juggernaut. Two children from their school have won Maryland championships this spring in the National Handwriting Contest.
NEWS
December 19, 1999
25 years ago: On June 12 and 13, 1976, the Mt. Airy Community will celebrate the 200th anniversary of he American Revolution.While still 18 months away, these dates chosen over holidays such as July Fourth and Memorial Day are going to be educational, entertaining and memorable if the commission, now well into the planning stages, gets the cooperation of every citizen, business, school, civic and service club. - the Community Reporter, Dec. 20, 1974.50 years ago: The appeal for a War Memorial for this city for many years came to a climax when our hustling mayor and Common Council decided that further delay would cause more talk and announced the purchase of a suitable and appropriate memorial to pay tribute to the honor and sacrifice of the fine men and women of Westminster who saw service in the armed forces of the United States during all wars.
NEWS
By Erika D. Peterman and Erika D. Peterman,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1999
Late last school year, Triadelphia Ridge Elementary School Principal Sue Webster had to mail a round of "positive postcards," notes of encouragement to acknowledge children for doing good work. A colleague suggested she simply type them on the computer. But Webster buckled down and wrote them -- 65 in all -- in her best handwriting. Her fingers ached. "I couldn't do it," Webster said of the computer idea. "It does give a personal message when you get something written by hand."
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 11, 2001
MAINTAINING attractive, legible handwriting might seem obsolete in a world dominated by computers. But Lauryn Fazenbaker, an 11-year-old pupil at Charles Carroll Elementary School, knows otherwise. Her proper penmanship recently won state-level recognition from Zaner-Bloser, the nation's leading publisher of handwriting texts. "If I wrote sloppy, no one would know what I had to say, if I had something really important to say," said Lauryn, who will receive a $500 savings bond, an engraved pen and an award plaque for her achievement.
NEWS
By Erika D. Peterman and Erika D. Peterman,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1999
Late last school year, Triadelphia Ridge Elementary School Principal Sue Webster had to mail a round of "positive postcards," notes of encouragement to acknowledge children for doing good work. A colleague suggested she simply type them on the computer. But Webster buckled down and wrote them -- 65 in all -- in her best handwriting. Her fingers ached. "I couldn't do it," Webster said of the computer idea. "It does give a personal message when you get something written by hand."
NEWS
By MIKE BOWLER and MIKE BOWLER,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1999
YESTERDAY WAS THE birthday of John Hancock, he of the bold first signature on the Declaration of Independence. In Hancock's honor, it was also National Handwriting Day, so proclaimed by America's makers of pens and pencils."
BUSINESS
By Diane E. Lewis and Diane E. Lewis,BOSTON GLOBE | February 3, 1997
Here's one for those who think penmanship no longer matters in the age of word processors and electronic mail.Cognex Inc., the Massachusetts manufacturer of ultrahigh-tech "machine vision" equipment, makes all applicants for managerial positions take a handwriting test. "We want to know whether an applicant can fit into our corporate culture," explains JoAnn Woodyard, human resources director.Olsten Corp., the Melville, N.Y., temporary work agency, uses handwriting analysis to screen all managerial and sales applicants for such traits as honesty and dependability.
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