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NEWS
By John Rivera | January 30, 1992
Corrections officials said yesterday that the state penitentiary in Baltimore has been locked down since Monday partly because inmates were dissatisfied with the coordinator of Muslim religious services and became unruly.About 150 prisoners on Sunday morning and 50 on Monday refused to leave their cells for breakfast, said Sgt. Gregory M. Shipley, a corrections spokesman.During a recreation period Monday afternoon, two telephones were ripped from a wall. The warden then decided to lock down the prison and initiate a shakedown -- an intensive search -- of the facility.
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NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | June 2, 2007
Yesterday's melee at the Metropolitan Transition Center in East Baltimore brought back memories of its notorious, violence-soaked past, when it was known simply as the Maryland Pen. The knife fight in the outdoor yard that left at least 18 inmates seriously injured, three with life-threatening wounds, was probably one of the worst, in terms of numbers, in the old stone prison's 196-year history, said Wallace Shugg, author of A Monument to Good Intentions: The...
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NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | December 15, 1992
A Maryland Penitentiary inmate serving life plus 20 years for murder was fatally stabbed in the throat and chest yesterday as he walked through a prison recreation area, authorities said.Martin Eugene Thomas, 24, was attacked in the "A" Block recreation flat about 2 p.m. by a man armed with some type of jagged blade, presumably a homemade weapon, said Cpl. J. Scott McCauley, a state prisons spokesman."The assailant stabbed him twice, once in the neck and once in the chest," Corporal McCauley said.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 22, 2006
Take a guy like Eric Brooks, for instance. He's 30 years old and he's been in trouble for - here's a shocker - dealing drugs in Baltimore. Last year, Brooks received a taxpayer-financed trip to a Maryland prison for seven months. He went to the Metropolitan Transition Center, which is the old Maryland Penitentiary, that Frankenstein castle commuters see from the Jones Falls Expressway. Based on what state officials have told me, it cost us about $14,000 to keep Eric Brooks there. Was this a good thing?
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2003
Richard Walter Singletary, who rose from correctional officer to security chief of the Maryland Penitentiary over a 36-year career, died of cancer Tuesday at Northwest Hospital Center. He was 68. Known as "Reno" by his friends, Mr. Singletary was respected by his colleagues and by the inmates he watched, said his daughter, Airuel Singletary of Pikesville. "Prisoners respected him," she said, describing encounters her father had at Lexington Market and around town, when he would see men he had guarded.
NEWS
By Susan Schoenberger | November 18, 1990
An article in Nov. 18 editions of The Sun incorrectly identified inmates who were cooking a Thanksgiving dinner. The inmates were from the Baltimore City Correctional Center and the Baltimore Pre-Release Unit.Emerson Smith and eight fellow inmates at the Maryland Penitentiary are peeling potatoes. Lots of them. About 8,000 pounds over five days.But no one was grumbling Thursday night as they sliced heaps of peeled potatoes on oversized cutting boards and dropped the quarters into lined trash cans.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1996
John J. Rodowsky, a teacher for 20 years in the education program at the Maryland Penitentiary, helping inmates earn their GED diplomas, died Saturday of kidney failure and cancer at his home in White Marsh. He was 72.Mr. Rodowsky, who retired in 1989, taught earlier at several Baltimore parochial schools and Indian Mountain School, a private school in Lakeville, Conn.What motivated him to teach at the prison was that "he simply wanted to help these men, and money wasn't important to my husband," said his wife, the former Joan Polillo.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | January 6, 1996
The attempted escape of a condemned inmate has prompted internal criticism of security at the Maryland Penitentiary and may lead officials to move Maryland's death-row prisoners to a super-maximum security prison.In a confidential memorandum on the Dec. 6 escape attempt of Scotland Eugene Williams, made available to The Sun, penitentiary warden Eugene M. Nuth wrote that the prison "is not a good maximum security facility" and that its routines "are too predictable."It is no secret that the maximum security designation of the penitentiary applies to the inmates, not to the ability of the facility to deliver maximum security," the warden wrote in the memorandum dated Dec. 18.Despite the warden's concerns, escapes from the penitentiary are rare.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1996
Prison officials have moved 15 men under death sentence in Maryland from the state penitentiary to the supermaximum Maryland Correctional Adjustment Center, ending long-standing tradition and raising further questions about the use of the Supermax prison.The move follows the steady decline in population at Supermax, on East Madison Street across from the penitentiary, and the attempted escape of a condemned inmate from the penitentiary.The penitentiary houses Maryland's gas and lethal-injection chambers.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1999
Sister John Francis Schilling proudly calls St. Frances Academy a second-chance school.Some would call it a last-chance or a take-a-chance school.Certainly, the tiny, urban, Roman Catholic high school has taken many chances that have paid off with students others wanted nothing to do with: youth from poor and troubled families, who have flunked out of public schools, who are street-smart, who have given up on themselves.But St. Frances Academy -- at Chase Street and Brentwood Avenue near the Maryland Penitentiary in Baltimore -- is thriving.
NEWS
By JENNIFER MCMENAMIN and JENNIFER MCMENAMIN,SUN REPORTER | December 6, 2005
Maryland has been engaged in capital punishment for more than 200 years - first by hanging, then a gas chamber and finally by lethal injection. The earliest recorded execution in the state took place Oct. 22, 1773, when four "convict servants" were hanged for slitting the throat of their master, Archibald Hoffman, according to a Maryland Penitentiary historian who wrote an overview on capital punishment for the Maryland Department of Public Safety and...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 25, 2005
WICHITA FALLS, TEXAS // Roderick Johnson, a former inmate at the Allred Unit, a violent prison a few miles from here, belonged to a gang called the Gangster Disciples, but not in the usual sense, the gang's former No. 2 man explained Wednesday in federal court. "Was Mr. Johnson considered a member of the Gangster Disciples?" one of Johnson's lawyers asked the witness, whose name was withheld by the court because his testimony could subject him to retaliation. "No," said the witness, a soft-spoken, perfectly bald and quite imposing black man in a prison uniform and shackles.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2004
Steven Oken's final days were carefully scripted in a 32-page state manual with eight appendixes. The state prison system's Execution Operations Manual establishes precise a sequence, starting 14 days before the death sentence is to be carried out, when an execution team is to be selected, through the hours after death, when a funeral director is summoned. In the dry language of a government training handbook, the manual - DCM 110-2 - lists, for example, preferred characteristics for a member of the execution team: "Ability to maintain confidentiality," "good moral character" and "professional appearance."
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 19, 2003
QUICHE-EATERS -- Democrat quiche-eaters, not the Republican kind -- gave us Supermax, the 300-bed tomb of a penitentiary that the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services wants to tear down just 14 years after it opened. It opened, in one of the most grotesque celebrations ever conceived (but typical of the 1980s), with black tie and evening gowns, and dozens of Maryland judges, politicians, Schaefer administration officials and even clergy sipping champagne and munching on grapes and quiche.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Maureen Ryan and Maureen Ryan,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 31, 2003
CHICAGO - In her personal ad, Susan says she considers herself "sensitive, caring, and kind-hearted." In his, Saul said he is "romantic, always funny" and has a "positive attitude." Not remarkable stuff, as personal ads go. Until you find out that Susan's last name is Smith, and that she's serving a life sentence for killing her two sons in 1994. Saul Dos Reis, whose Internet personal ad was recently taken down, pleaded guilty in March to state manslaughter and sexual-assault charges in the death of Christina Long, 13, of Connecticut, whom prosecutors say Dos Reis befriended over the Internet.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2003
Richard Walter Singletary, who rose from correctional officer to security chief of the Maryland Penitentiary over a 36-year career, died of cancer Tuesday at Northwest Hospital Center. He was 68. Known as "Reno" by his friends, Mr. Singletary was respected by his colleagues and by the inmates he watched, said his daughter, Airuel Singletary of Pikesville. "Prisoners respected him," she said, describing encounters her father had at Lexington Market and around town, when he would see men he had guarded.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2001
Police searched yesterday for an inmate who officials said escaped while he was being escorted from a doctor's appointment at the Maryland Penitentiary on East Madison Street. Russel Simmons, 25, of the 200 block of E. Lafayette Ave., was charged in a warrant with escape, which carries a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison. Officials said Simmons, in prison on handgun and drug charges since July 4, 1999, was scheduled to be released April 14, in less than two months. Because his release date was so close, prison officials said Simmons was being held in the pre- release center in the 900 block of Greenmount Ave., where "he was being prepared for re-entry to society," said Division of Corrections spokesman David B. Towers.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2000
When the Maryland Penitentiary opened Nov. 18, 1811, the first prisoner to enter was a 22-year-old slave convicted of murder in Prince Georges County, his name recorded in the flowing script of a 19th-century reception clerk only as "Negro Bob." He never left. He died in the penitentiary 44 years later and was buried inside the walls. He's probably still there. "He was buried in the No. 4 Yard down here," says Wallace Shugg, the author of a new history, "A Monument to Good Intentions: The Story of the Maryland Penitentiary 1804 to 1995," published by the Maryland Historical Society.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 10, 2001
TERRE HAUTE, Ind. - The federal penitentiary where Timothy J. McVeigh awaits his death sits near the fairgrounds, the bowling center and the Miss Softball America field on Highway 63. Just beyond the penitentiary's clipped grounds, with its small "Do Not Enter" signs, are modest ranch houses, a gift shop and the Happy Hair beauty salon. The prison, set on a lush green lawn far from the road, almost seems to blend into the landscape. That is, until the field of television trucks pops into view, the guards in bulletproof vests shift at their posts and the sheriff's car zooms by for the second time in 10 minutes.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2001
Bishop L. Robinson owns a set of bookends carved from the granite that once held up the vermin-infested South Wing of the Maryland Penitentiary -- the same building dubbed by state officials in the 1980s as "the innermost circle of hell." As Maryland's public safety chief, Robinson vowed to tear it down and did. Now he's determined to get another pair of bookends, this time from the walls of the Cheltenham Youth Facility, the notoriously crowded detention center in Prince George's County.
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