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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For the Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Three nautical miles from downtown Annapolis but seeming worlds away is the private peninsula where Mill and Burley creeks meet the Chesapeake Bay - and where 2077 Maidstone Farm Road, a nine-acre estate with 2,000 feet of waterfront, awaits its new owner. A Tudor-style home built of stucco in 1916 harks back to an era of elegant living. Touches of period craftsmanship outside and inside were provided by Italian artisans commissioned by the home's owner and builder, James Bowdoin, great-grandson of the founder of Bowdoin College in Maine.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2014
When Guy W. Willey Sr. was growing up, he hunted and ate Delmarva fox squirrels in the low-lying forests of the Eastern Shore, long before it was clear the giant cousins of the common gray squirrel were in danger of disappearing. He was "dirt poor," he recalled, and lots of folks did it back then. Now, at 83, he's been invited to Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge on Friday, when federal officials are expected to announce the squirrel has bounced back from the brink of extinction and is no longer in need of legal protection.
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FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
On Maryland's Eastern Shore, 6201 Swan Creek Road in Rock Hall reaches new heights in property ownership. A classic 19th-century farmhouse and a charming waterfront cottage sit on a private peninsula consisting of 177-plus acres of farmland. With gorgeous views of the Chesapeake Bay, the main farmhouse has been meticulously restored by the owner from the foundation up - including a major addition completed in 1998 that nearly doubles the living space. This has allowed for a modern kitchen, family room, guest room and an office.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
On Maryland's Eastern Shore, 6201 Swan Creek Road in Rock Hall reaches new heights in property ownership. A classic 19th-century farmhouse and a charming waterfront cottage sit on a private peninsula consisting of 177-plus acres of farmland. With gorgeous views of the Chesapeake Bay, the main farmhouse has been meticulously restored by the owner from the foundation up - including a major addition completed in 1998 that nearly doubles the living space. This has allowed for a modern kitchen, family room, guest room and an office.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Staff Writer | October 22, 1993
After more than four years of work, Lower Back River Neck Peninsula residents are praising the Baltimore County Council's approval of a plan they say will protect and preserve their community.At Monday night's meeting, the council approved a plan residents and the county Office of Planning and Zoning created to preserve the peninsula's marshes and woodlands and restore its coastal creeks.The plan, which the county Planning Board has approved, calls for limiting development, reducing zoning density and rigorously enforcing environmental regulations.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,Staff writer | May 1, 1992
An article in Friday's editions incorrectly stated the capacity of the proposed storefront library in Long Point Mall or Lake Shore Plaza.The library will be able to house 47,000 volumes.The folks on the Long Point peninsula may finally get the library they've been lobbying for the last eight years. But it won't happen for another year, according to county budget analyst Greg Nourse.The capital budget County Executive Robert R. Neall is to release today contains a little more than $1 million for a temporary storefront library either in Long Point Mall or Lake Shore Plaza.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Baltimore County Bureau of the Sun | February 17, 1991
Under the steel-gray sky, a piercing wind puffs foamy crest on the sea-green wavelets lapping over the bulkheads. Flocks of canvasback and mallard ducks swoop, circle and land to bob on the water.The waterfowl dive quickly for corn tossed into the water by Augie Zadera and Steve Takos, hunting buddies of 40 years who, in another season, might be trying to make a meal of these ducks instead of feeding them.Behind them, traffic is sparse on the puddled streets, which often flood during heavy storms or extremely high tides.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2001
Harford County's prosperity is coming to bear in Perryman. Best known for Gabler's crab house and Mitchell's white-kernel corn, the Perryman peninsula stretches 5 miles long, with Aberdeen Proving Ground at one edge and the Bush River at another. Fields of corn and soybeans roll out in verdant vistas, first laid out by Colonial settlers. But Perryman is slowly shedding its quiet coastal farmland as it takes on a role the county chose for it nearly a half-century ago, and the changes are causing dismay among residents who are working on a plan for the peninsula's future.
NEWS
By Patrick A. Gilbert and Patrick A. Gilbert,Staff Writer | October 25, 1992
Deep inside the woods called Muddy Gut, surrounded by century-old oaks, Theresa Guckert bends down to examine a little waif of a plant.On this first day of autumn, the whorled pagonia orchid, its bloom long ago lost, doesn't look very spectacular. But Mrs. Guckert is reassured by the sight of this plant rarely seen in the Piedmont coastal area.She knows this stretch of land. She has walked the woods and ravines of Muddy Gut -- so-called because it surrounds a tidal creek of the same name.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2004
The skyline is rising in Millers Island. In the tiny community, which juts into the intersection of Back River and the Chesapeake Bay, low-lying houses are propped in the air, high above the water lapping at their lawns. A house near the tip of the peninsula sits on makeshift wooden towers, waiting for a new foundation. Underneath it is a clear view of seabirds, water and distant Rocky Point Park. Hinton Avenue is a patchwork of muddy lots, Federal Emergency Management Agency trailers and damaged houses lifted onto cinder blocks.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For the Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Three nautical miles from downtown Annapolis but seeming worlds away is the private peninsula where Mill and Burley creeks meet the Chesapeake Bay - and where 2077 Maidstone Farm Road, a nine-acre estate with 2,000 feet of waterfront, awaits its new owner. A Tudor-style home built of stucco in 1916 harks back to an era of elegant living. Touches of period craftsmanship outside and inside were provided by Italian artisans commissioned by the home's owner and builder, James Bowdoin, great-grandson of the founder of Bowdoin College in Maine.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
State environmental officials and the owners of the Sparrows Point peninsula are moving toward a settlement to correct alleged regulatory violations at the former steelmaking site. Regulators say an array of problems have occurred over the past year on the 2,300-acre peninsula, including illegal open dumping of industrial sludge, improper handling of hazardous materials and the running of an unlicensed scrap tire operation. "We are drafting a settlement in the form of a consent order which will provide terms and a schedule for corrective actions - and which will include a financial penalty," Maryland Department of the Environment spokesman Jay Apperson said in a statement.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2013
Peninsula Regional Medical Center announced Wednesday that it will lay off 58 employees and offer buyouts to 130 as the number of patients it treats declines. The employees who lose their jobs will be offered severance packages and the opportunity to apply for other jobs at the Salisbury hospital, the company said in a statement. Peninsula Regional on average has 66 fewer patients in the hospital a day than last year. The medical center is licensed for 288 beds and expects that number to decrease to 250 within the next two years.
NEWS
April 8, 2013
North Korea's recent threats to target South Korean and American cities with atomic destruction have the shrill belligerence of a 6-year-old's temper tantrum. But while few analysts believe North Korea has the means to carry out its threats, U.S. and South Korean officials would nevertheless be unwise to ignore them. With tensions on the peninsula higher than at any time since the end of the Korean War, there's great danger a conflict could break out by accident or through miscalculation.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2012
Thanks to demand from the defense sector, the vacancy rate for office space in Baltimore's suburbs is lower than anywhere else in the United States except for two suburban markets in California, a new commercial real estate report shows. Suburban Baltimore had an office vacancy rate of 14 percent, according to an overview of the mid-Atlantic commercial market released this month by Cushman & Wakefield, a commercial real estate firm that operates nationwide. That's lower than any other suburban market the firm tracks except for two high-tech hotbeds: the San Francisco peninsula, which has an 11.6 percent vacancy rate, and Silicon Valley, with a 12.7 percent rate.
NEWS
By David Butterworth | June 4, 2011
Over the past two years, Yemen-based al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula's (AQAP) global operational and ideological reach have added significant strategic depth to the besieged al-Qaida Senior Leadership organization (AQSL) in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Now, with the leadership vacuum Osama bin Laden's death has created, coupled with an apparent succession crisis in Yemen, AQAP is likely, over the course of the next year, to displace AQSL as the "vanguard of the Muslim Ummah," as the group characterized itself in December, and become the principal driver of the al-Qaida movement's effort to attack the U.S. and its allies in Europe.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2001
Harford County planners took a proposal for developing the Perryman peninsula back to its architects -- the residents of the community -- for approval last night, and residents met the plan with skepticism. Mark Sinclair, a resident of Forest Greens, said the plan was not what the residents wanted. "This was the best of what we were allowed to pick," he said, noting that the plan looks good now but that residents "are concerned about ramifications 15 to 20 years down the line." The multilayered plan -- the result of three community "visioning" sessions -- would preserve about half of the area as green space.
NEWS
June 29, 1999
THE WATERFRONT LAND once occupied by an AlliedSignal chrome plant represents a rare redevelopment opportunity. Its size and location -- a 27-acre peninsula adjoining Fells Point -- make it one of the most prestigious building sites in the city.For those reasons alone, city officials and AlliedSignal executives ought to be picky about what is built there.Years ago, AlliedSignal -- which has spent $100 million decontaminating the site -- acquired a permit to build a mixed-use development of offices and residences.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2011
Iris Straitt had some sage parting words for her son. "Enjoy those cookies, darling," she said with a wave, as Richard Straitt, a National Guardsman based in Dundalk, walked to a bus Thursday morning, the first steps of his yearlong deployment to Egypt's Sinai Peninsula. "I love ya," she added softly, the words almost lost in the bustle outside the Jerome M. Grollman Armory, where 85 members of the Maryland Army National Guard's 1st Battalion, 175th Infantry Regiment, had just been given a send-off by Gov. Martin O'Malley and a group of Army brass.
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