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Pelvic Pain

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By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | January 25, 1994
Rebecca Katz was 29 when she first felt the searing pain in her pelvis that was to change her life. Over the following months, as the pain increased, sometimes causing her to double over, she was examined by specialist after specialist: four gynecologists and two urologists.Exploratory procedures revealed nothing. All the usual tests came back negative. One urologist told her she was "bladder obsessed."Yet every day, the pain seemed to grow."I was going from doctor to doctor who was either dismissing me immediately or who was getting frustrated and then dismissing me," says the Baltimore marketing consultant, who is now 31. "They would say, 'We can't find anything wrong with you.' . . . I thought, 'Am I going crazy?
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2013
Women who find themselves having a hard time getting pregnant may have endometriosis to blame. The condition is one of the most common causes of infertility. Dr. Michael A. Giudice, a physician of obstetrics and gynecology with University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center, explains what causes the condition and how to treat it. What is endometriosis? Endometriosis is a chronic gynecologic disorder that causes infertility and pelvic pain. It occurs in 6 to 10 percent of women of reproductive age, but in up to 50 percent in women with infertility and 80 percent of women with chronic pelvic pain.
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FEATURES
March 28, 1995
If you're looking for information about a variety of health and fitness topics, you might find what you're looking for in stories now available from the Sun on Demand service of The Baltimore Sun.Each story, which has appeared in The Baltimore Sun, is $2.95 plus tax. Order by calling Sun on Demand at (410) 332-6800 and asking for the article by its four-digit code.Alternative medicine, 6301Alzheimer's, 6309Box aerobics, 6314Breast cancer amongAfrican-Americans, 6316Breast cancer'sother victims, 6315Breast-feeding, 6302Broccoli asa cancer preventive, 6317Chronobiology andhuman circadian rhythms, 6308Ear infections, 6307Incontinence, 6304Lice, 6310Menopause, 6303Pelvic pain, 6305Prostate health, 6313Radial keratomy, 6306Sleep apnea, 6312Snoring andlaser surgery, 6311
NEWS
By Judy Foreman Judy Foreman Judy Foreman | November 3, 2006
Christina Shimek, a senior at St. Bernard's High School in Fitchburg, Mass., is only 17, but she has already experienced more pain than many adults have to bear in a lifetime. A year ago, Christina said, she woke up one morning "in excruciating pain in my lower back and pelvic area. I was in tears." Frantic, her parents took her to the hospital, where doctors assumed the trouble was her appendix and took it out. But the appendix turned out to be normal. The pain persisted. She missed school for four months, had to repeat chemistry and missed an important rite of passage, her "junior ring ceremony," in which students get their class rings.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2013
Women who find themselves having a hard time getting pregnant may have endometriosis to blame. The condition is one of the most common causes of infertility. Dr. Michael A. Giudice, a physician of obstetrics and gynecology with University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center, explains what causes the condition and how to treat it. What is endometriosis? Endometriosis is a chronic gynecologic disorder that causes infertility and pelvic pain. It occurs in 6 to 10 percent of women of reproductive age, but in up to 50 percent in women with infertility and 80 percent of women with chronic pelvic pain.
FEATURES
By LINELL SMITH and LINELL SMITH,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1997
As she entered mid-life, Connie Koller was losing almost a week of every month to her abnormally heavy menstrual periods. Employed full time in the accounting department of Good Samaritan Hospital, trying to keep up with the schedules of three children, the 41-year-old Parkville woman often felt as if she were rushing to plan her life around her periods."
NEWS
By Judy Foreman Judy Foreman Judy Foreman | November 3, 2006
Christina Shimek, a senior at St. Bernard's High School in Fitchburg, Mass., is only 17, but she has already experienced more pain than many adults have to bear in a lifetime. A year ago, Christina said, she woke up one morning "in excruciating pain in my lower back and pelvic area. I was in tears." Frantic, her parents took her to the hospital, where doctors assumed the trouble was her appendix and took it out. But the appendix turned out to be normal. The pain persisted. She missed school for four months, had to repeat chemistry and missed an important rite of passage, her "junior ring ceremony," in which students get their class rings.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2010
Many women of child-bearing years feel pain in their pelvic area and don't know what it is. It gets worse as the day goes on, and with each pregnancy. Their doctors also sometimes can't determine the cause. Dr. Kelvin Hong, an assistant professor of radiology and surgery at the Johns Hopkins University's School of Medicine, said it could be pelvic congestion syndrome. And it could get worse over time. Question: What is pelvic congestion syndrome (PCS)? Answer: According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, pelvic congestion syndrome is one of the recognized causes of chronic pelvic pain.
NEWS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS SERVICE | August 26, 2005
Ovarian-cancer survival may be predicted by the levels of two proteins in the body, a new study shows, while other recent research suggests that more women's lives might be saved by using existing tests to diagnose persistent symptoms that might indicate the presence of the so-called "silent killer." Scientists at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston said in a report this week that low levels of both atypical protein kinase C iota and Cyclin E corresponded to a better chance of long-term survival for patients.
FEATURES
August 16, 1998
After Wednesday's report that chlamydia has reached epidemic status among teens, people may have questions about the sexually transmitted disease. The report, stemming from a three-year study by the Johns Hopkins University of 3,200 Baltimore youths aged 12 to 19, called for twice-a-year testing for sexually active adolescents.Here, some common questions about chlamydia are answered by Dr. Helene Gayle, director of the National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention, a branch of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and other experts:What causes chlamydia?
FEATURES
By LINELL SMITH and LINELL SMITH,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1997
As she entered mid-life, Connie Koller was losing almost a week of every month to her abnormally heavy menstrual periods. Employed full time in the accounting department of Good Samaritan Hospital, trying to keep up with the schedules of three children, the 41-year-old Parkville woman often felt as if she were rushing to plan her life around her periods."
FEATURES
March 28, 1995
If you're looking for information about a variety of health and fitness topics, you might find what you're looking for in stories now available from the Sun on Demand service of The Baltimore Sun.Each story, which has appeared in The Baltimore Sun, is $2.95 plus tax. Order by calling Sun on Demand at (410) 332-6800 and asking for the article by its four-digit code.Alternative medicine, 6301Alzheimer's, 6309Box aerobics, 6314Breast cancer amongAfrican-Americans, 6316Breast cancer'sother victims, 6315Breast-feeding, 6302Broccoli asa cancer preventive, 6317Chronobiology andhuman circadian rhythms, 6308Ear infections, 6307Incontinence, 6304Lice, 6310Menopause, 6303Pelvic pain, 6305Prostate health, 6313Radial keratomy, 6306Sleep apnea, 6312Snoring andlaser surgery, 6311
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | January 25, 1994
Rebecca Katz was 29 when she first felt the searing pain in her pelvis that was to change her life. Over the following months, as the pain increased, sometimes causing her to double over, she was examined by specialist after specialist: four gynecologists and two urologists.Exploratory procedures revealed nothing. All the usual tests came back negative. One urologist told her she was "bladder obsessed."Yet every day, the pain seemed to grow."I was going from doctor to doctor who was either dismissing me immediately or who was getting frustrated and then dismissing me," says the Baltimore marketing consultant, who is now 31. "They would say, 'We can't find anything wrong with you.' . . . I thought, 'Am I going crazy?
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Contributing Writer | December 21, 1993
Fibroids are the single most common reason for a woman to have a hysterectomy. Some 30 percent of all hysterectomies are performed because of fibroids. But nowadays there are many treatment options available for fibroids before a woman needs to consider hysterectomy.I spoke to Dr. Edward Wallach, chairman of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Johns Hopkins Health Institutions about this common problem.*What are fibroids?Fibroids, also called uterine myomas, grow out of the muscular wall of the uterus.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2004
Maryland women who want to be screened for two sexually transmitted diseases can now do it at home instead of traipsing to the doctor's office for an uncomfortable pelvic exam, under a pilot program led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. The study, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, offers free kits from local pharmacies that allow women to test themselves for chlamydia and gonorrhea, then send a sample back to a Hopkins lab in a postage-paid envelope.
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