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NEWS
November 29, 2011
Thank you for Tami Luhby's thoughtful, yet distressing analysis of the stark differences in college graduation rates ("College gap widens between rich, poor," Nov 25). Given the Census Bureau's new supplemental poverty measure that shows that 49.1 million Americans are poor (16.1 percent), the research Ms. Luhby cites from the Universities of Michigan and Wisconsin suggests that economic and social mobility by low and moderate income families will worsen. Moreover, recent amendments to both House and Senate federal legislation seek to deny students who earn their GEDs from receiving Pell Grants to further their education and training.
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NEWS
April 11, 2014
The marvel of Rep. Paul Ryan's budget, which the House of Representatives approved this week, is that for a piece of legislation that's essentially dead on arrival in the Senate, it's going to live on as a political document from now until November. That was the point, of course, but it seems more likely that Republicans will regret its passage than Democrats. Conventional wisdom in Washington is that the GOP has the upper hand in the midterm elections, and polls seem to bear that out. As recently as a few weeks ago, statistical wunderkind Nate Silver viewed Republicans as being the slight favorites to wrest control of the U.S. Senate from the Democrats this year.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 11, 1993
Fraud in Pell Grants is like fraud in defense procurement: The moral is to clean up the program, not get rid of it.Imagine what it cost the nation and media for a passel of cameras to follow Bill to West Virginia where he went for the purpose of having his picture taken.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | December 18, 2013
It's charity time, and not just because the holiday season reminds us to be charitable. As the tax year draws to a close, the charitable tax deduction beckons. America's wealthy are its largest beneficiaries. According to the Congressional Budget Office, $33 billion of last year's $39 billion in total charitable deductions went to the richest 20 percent of Americans, of whom the richest 1 percent reaped the lion's share. The generosity of the super-rich is sometimes proffered as evidence they're contributing as much to the nation's well-being as they did decades ago, when they paid a much larger share of their earnings in taxes.
NEWS
January 2, 2009
CLAIBORNE PELL, 90 U.S. senator, creator of Pell Grants Claiborne Pell, the quirky blueblood who represented blue-collar Rhode Island in the U.S. Senate for 36 years and was the force behind a grant program that has helped tens of millions of Americans attend college, died yesterday at his Newport home after a long battle with Parkinson's disease. Mr. Pell, a Democrat, spoke with an aristocratic tone but was an unabashed liberal who spent his political career championing causes to help the less fortunate.
NEWS
November 27, 1998
THE BAD NEWS for poor and minority youngsters wanting to go to college just got worse.A recent study has reaffirmed that the cost of higher education continues to climb, making it more unaffordable for low-income families. The study was done for the Institute for Higher Education Policy and the Education Resources Institute.That news, combined with the assault on affirmative action that has resulted in enrollment declines, means that fewer blacks, Latinos and other nonwhites will be seen on the nation's campuses.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Sun Staff Writer | May 22, 1994
Edwin Downs is a hard-working college freshman. He's also a convicted murderer serving a sentence of life plus 20 years in a maximum-security Jessup prison.It's a combination that doesn't sit well with Congress, which appears poised to stop paying for college tuition for Downs and other inmates.One provision of the anti-crime bill under final consideration in Washington would prohibit inmates from receiving federally funded scholarships known as Pell grants.Prisoners should not be getting college scholarships when many middle-class taxpayers can't afford tuition, proponents of the ban say.Others say a ban would be a short-sighted abandonment of the concept of rehabilitation.
NEWS
By Mary Ellen Dougherty | May 4, 1995
IN A FEW WEEKS, at the close of this current academic year, college programs at prisons all over the country will end. That's when a provision of the Omnibus Crime Bill takes effect. That measure, which allocates substantial money to states for the building and operation of new prisons and detention centers, eliminates the use of federal Pell grants for prisoners.Educational programs for inmates vary, especially in state prisons. Adult basic education and general equivalency diploma classes are usually standard.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 14, 2000
WASHINGTON -- The University of Phoenix, a leader in providing higher education to adults, has improperly allowed students to obtain millions of dollars in federal loans and grants, the inspector general for the Department of Education has found. The government's review concluded that students had obtained more than $50.6 million in federal loans and $4 million in Pell Grants in excess of the amounts they were entitled to receive. The financial aid is granted to students to help with tuition and other expenses.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | January 31, 1994
Jessup. -- Peanut is a man of few words, but his gaze can peel paint and he frowns eloquently about something Congress may do regarding Pell grants.Peanut's given name is Eugene Taylor. He has spent about half his 42 years situated as he now is, behind bars and barbed wire, sentenced to life plus 25 years for murder and armed robbery. He dropped out of school in the 9th grade. The school, he indicates, had no strong objection. Sentimentalists who think there is no such thing as a bad boy never met Peanut in his misspent youth.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2013
The across-the-board federal spending cuts known as the sequester come at a bad time for Maryland colleges. Many usually send out financial award letters this month, but they still don't have all the details on how much federal funding they will receive for certain aid programs. And even if the Department of Education gives them firm numbers before letters go out, school officials say, Congress and the White House could reach a later deal that would involve further aid changes. "For aid officers, it's extremely frustrating to have change at the last minute," said David Horne, director of financial aid at Towson University.
NEWS
March 8, 2013
I may be influenced by a recent performance of "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof," but the first word that came to mind after reading Robert Ehrlich's recent column was "mendacity" ("Disability insurance entitlement explodes under Obama," March 3). His depiction of the Obama administration's goals and the current economic and policy environment is long on hyperbole, but noticeably short on facts. Contrary to his assertion, numbers can lie. Mr. Ehrlich begins his column with the oft-repeated canard that a majority of Americans are "on some form of public assistance" and, based on this dubious statistic, asserts that President Barack Obama wants to transform the U.S. into a European-style welfare state.
NEWS
By Debbie Hines | October 14, 2012
TV commercials, debates, rallies and campaign speeches are among the ways to view the presidential candidates' positions and what's important to women in this year's election. Another way is speaking to female legislators to get their perspective on issues of concern to women. I was fortunate to interview a diverse group of women legislators from Maryland and the Maryland Women's Caucus on the issues that pertain to women. Maryland women lawmakers represent the diversity of our country with members from all walks of life, ethnicities, races and sexual orientations, including African-Americans, Hispanics, whites, Asian-Americans/Pacific Islanders, Indian-Americans, Caribbean-Americans and openly gay members.
NEWS
By Calvin Ball | September 4, 2012
- The first week of September is a special time for me. It marks the beginning of a school year and, as an educator and parent, it signifies the beginning of the next leg of an exciting journey of learning. Another major reason the beginning of September remains so special to me is because it's the time when both my father, who is my first hero, and I commemorate our birthdays. And this year is a monumental occasion as I enjoy our celebration while doing something I love, being a proud Democrat and Obama delegate to the Democratic National Convention.
NEWS
November 29, 2011
Thank you for Tami Luhby's thoughtful, yet distressing analysis of the stark differences in college graduation rates ("College gap widens between rich, poor," Nov 25). Given the Census Bureau's new supplemental poverty measure that shows that 49.1 million Americans are poor (16.1 percent), the research Ms. Luhby cites from the Universities of Michigan and Wisconsin suggests that economic and social mobility by low and moderate income families will worsen. Moreover, recent amendments to both House and Senate federal legislation seek to deny students who earn their GEDs from receiving Pell Grants to further their education and training.
NEWS
By David Wilson | July 21, 2011
For much of the early history of the U.S., college was only for a small segment of society, the elite. As the need for more practical education and broader access to higher education became apparent if the United States was going to fully develop its engineering and agricultural sectors to outcompete the rest of the world, the federal government passed the Morrill Act of 1862, which promoted the development of land grant universities in each state....
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | November 11, 1995
Some 2,000 Maryland college students -- permanent American residents, who are not citizens -- would likely be stripped of their eligibility for several million dollars in federal grants and loans each year if a congressional proposal to cut aid for legal immigrants becomes law.The little-noticed provision, buried in a congressional plan for sharp reductions in welfare spending, would shake the states of California and New York most vigorously. But Maryland has a relatively high number of legal immigrants on its campuses, and area college officials interviewed were unanimous in opposition to the measure.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 26, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Republicans in Congress have abandoned a plan to deny federal higher education aid to lawful immigrants, but still want to limit access to the Head Start program for the youngest legal aliens.Republican welfare legislation would limit, and in some instances deny, the right of aliens lawfully in this country to receive most kinds of federal aid, including food stamps, Medicaid and short-term child welfare.But after protests from spokesmen for colleges and universities, who insisted that education was not welfare, a House-Senate conference committee decided last week to drop the proposed ban on immigrants' receiving Pell grants, which provide scholarship aid to college students, and federal student loans.
NEWS
By Yash Gupta | February 21, 2011
President Barack Obama's heart was in the right place when he made his Valentine's Day visit to a technology middle school in Parkville. Yet even as the president sought to encourage investment in education, the new spending plans of both the administration and House Republicans spell bad news for America's role as a knowledge and innovation leader. Maybe the word hasn't reached everyone in Washington, but the global innovation sweepstakes is definitely on, and the competition is brutal.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose Personal finance | March 21, 2010
T he federal student loan program has gone through many changes in its 45-year history, and now it's time for the next big step: cutting out the middleman. That's what the Obama administration proposes to do starting in July. Students now get federal loans through a private lender or directly from the government. Obama wants all federal loans to come straight from Uncle Sam, which would create a net savings of $62 billion through 2020, according to figures last week from the Congressional Budget Office.
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