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NEWS
April 13, 2003
On April 1, 2003, BROOKE PEIRCE; beloved husband of Carol E. Peirce (nee Marshall); dear uncle of Lawrence Pierce, of Northampton, MA and Brooke Pierce Heraty, of Boston, MA. A Memorial Service will be held at the Haebler Chapel, on the Goucher College Campus, on Saturday, April 26, at 3 P.M. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to The Brooke Peirce Memorial Fund, Goucher College, 1021 Dulaney Valley Road, Towson, MD 21204. Arrangements by the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc.
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NEWS
October 27, 2005
CAROL EMILY PEIRCE died August 31, 2005. Survived by Lawrence Pierce of Hatfield, MA, Brooke Pierce Heraty of Boston, MA, and Carol Williams Niederlander of St. Louis, MO. Memorial service to be held at Haebler Chapel on the Goucher College Campus, 3 P.M. Saturday, October 28, 2005. Donations in lieu of flowers, to Carol Peirce Memorial Fund, University of Baltimore or Carol and Brooke Peirce Fund at Goucher College.
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NEWS
October 27, 2005
CAROL EMILY PEIRCE died August 31, 2005. Survived by Lawrence Pierce of Hatfield, MA, Brooke Pierce Heraty of Boston, MA, and Carol Williams Niederlander of St. Louis, MO. Memorial service to be held at Haebler Chapel on the Goucher College Campus, 3 P.M. Saturday, October 28, 2005. Donations in lieu of flowers, to Carol Peirce Memorial Fund, University of Baltimore or Carol and Brooke Peirce Fund at Goucher College.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2005
Carol Peirce, a retired University of Baltimore English professor who wrote extensively about the novelist Lawrence Durrell, died of pneumonia related to cancer Wednesday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Cockeysville resident was 83. Born Emily Williams in St. Louis, she later changed her name to Carol Marshall and earned an English degree at Radcliffe College in Cambridge, Mass. She earned a doctorate from Harvard University and wrote her dissertation on the literature of the Renaissance.
NEWS
April 27, 1992
Alice G. Peirce, a retired real estate saleswoman, died Friday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center after being hospitalized with an intestinal illness. She was 83 and a Pinehurst resident for 45 years.Services for Mrs. Peirce will be held at 10:30 a.m. tomorrow in the chapel of the Church of the Redeemer, 5603 N. Charles St.She had been a partner for about 45 years in her husband's real estate business, Temple H. Peirce & Co. When she started in 1940, she was one of the first five female real estate agents in the area.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | June 7, 1995
Temple H. Peirce, a retired Baltimore real estate and insurance broker, died Monday of congestive heart failure at Union Memorial Hospital. The Roland Park resident was 85.Mr. Peirce, formerly a 45-year resident of Pinehurst, retired in 1985 from the real estate and casualty insurance business that he had operated for more than 50 years with his wife, the former Alice G. Waldenberger, who died three years ago.The couple, who married in 1938, opened the business in the Court Square Building in downtown Baltimore in the early 1940s.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2003
Brooke Peirce, a retired Goucher College English professor who imparted a love of Shakespeare and classical literature to his students, died Tuesday of lung cancer at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Cockeysville resident was 81. "His teaching was always superb, and he was a voice of culture and sanity in the faculty," said Rhoda Dorsey, former Goucher president. "He was polite, Southern in his ways and he loved language. He told a good joke, was funny and read constantly." Born in Washington and raised on Baltimore's University Parkway, he was a 1939 City College graduate.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2005
Carol Peirce, a retired University of Baltimore English professor who wrote extensively about the novelist Lawrence Durrell, died of pneumonia related to cancer Wednesday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Cockeysville resident was 83. Born Emily Williams in St. Louis, she later changed her name to Carol Marshall and earned an English degree at Radcliffe College in Cambridge, Mass. She earned a doctorate from Harvard University and wrote her dissertation on the literature of the Renaissance.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | December 5, 1994
What will the Republicans do with their golden opportunity to reshape state government in America?Neal R. Peirce writes a column on state and urban affairs.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | October 10, 1994
Washington -- Are inner cities about to be cured of the great supermarket blight?Neal R. Peirce writes a column on state and urban affairs.
NEWS
September 13, 2004
On Tuesday, September 7, 2004, GRACE POE BRAWNER, 96, of Ocean Ridge, FL. She was the wife of the late H. Peirce Brawner, of Ocean Ridge, who died in 1981. Mrs. Brawner was born February 7, 1908, in Baltimore, MD and lived in Ruxton, MD, Gibson Island, MD, Raleigh, NC, Charleston, WV, Wellesley Hills, MA and Cleveland, OH before moving to Florida in 1958. She was a descendant of Robert Morris and Phillip Livingston, signers of the Declaration of Independence, and George Poe, who served as an officer in the Revolution and was with General Washington at Valley Forge.
NEWS
April 13, 2003
On April 1, 2003, BROOKE PEIRCE; beloved husband of Carol E. Peirce (nee Marshall); dear uncle of Lawrence Pierce, of Northampton, MA and Brooke Pierce Heraty, of Boston, MA. A Memorial Service will be held at the Haebler Chapel, on the Goucher College Campus, on Saturday, April 26, at 3 P.M. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to The Brooke Peirce Memorial Fund, Goucher College, 1021 Dulaney Valley Road, Towson, MD 21204. Arrangements by the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2003
Brooke Peirce, a retired Goucher College English professor who imparted a love of Shakespeare and classical literature to his students, died Tuesday of lung cancer at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Cockeysville resident was 81. "His teaching was always superb, and he was a voice of culture and sanity in the faculty," said Rhoda Dorsey, former Goucher president. "He was polite, Southern in his ways and he loved language. He told a good joke, was funny and read constantly." Born in Washington and raised on Baltimore's University Parkway, he was a 1939 City College graduate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,Sun Staff | July 22, 2001
Chasing skirts, ingesting cocaine, advertising his own genius, failing to mark grades on time -- what, a member of the Johns Hopkins University faculty? Well, yes and no. It is one of the distinct curiosities of the summer that a best-selling tome about 19th-century intellectual history, Louis Menand's The Metaphysical Club, has uncloaked this shadowy figure in Baltimore history. Tracing the development of America's most important philosophical contribution to the world -- pragmatism -- the book introduces the tragic, seamy and engrossing tale of a bygone Hopkins philosopher whom some insist today was an American Aristotle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | July 1, 2001
Metaphysics, of course, is the study of first principles, things like knowing and being -- efforts to understand the nature of reality and other vast conceptual abstractions. The idea invites irony. In "Whispers of Immortality," T. S. Eliot famously worried about keeping the things warm. H. L. Mencken may have done best with "Metaphysics is almost always an attempt to prove the incredible by an appeal to the unintelligible." For the proscenium -- and title -- of his compelling exploration of three-quarters of a century of U.S. intellectual history, the fearless journalist Louis Menand chose an irony upon an irony: "The Metaphysical Club: A Story of Ideas in America" (Farrar Straus Giroux.
NEWS
February 14, 1999
Precision countsHERE'S A timely excerpt from this month's Anne Arundel Bar Association newsletter:"The president, if able to forum shop, might prefer a perjury trial in Maryland. The Court of Special Appeals, citing U.S. Supreme Court precedent, holds that a defendant may not be convicted of perjury for a statement which was `literally true [but effectively] unresponsive and implied a negative answer.' Thus, precise questioning is imperative as a predicate for the offense of perjury."Andrea F. SiegelLicense to speakALMOST THREE hours into an Annapolis hearing on St. Helena Island on Thursday, Crownsville resident Beatrice Peirce stepped up to the microphone and tried to clarify some ground rules with Stephen LeGendre, county administrative hearing officer, before speaking.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | November 29, 1993
Washington. -- Could the best model to help bleeding urban neighborhoods be a 107-year-old prototype?Neal R. Peirce writes a column on state and urban affairs.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | June 29, 1992
The Bush-Kemp enterprise-zone bill -- the administration's all-purpose cure for ailing inner cities -- is too much too late.Neal R. Peirce writes a column on state and urban affairs.
NEWS
February 7, 1999
Too many prisoners? Ask Americans who now feel saferI would like to respond to the Opinion Commentary article by Neal Peirce "Poignant letters from American jails" (Feb. 2). Mr. Peirce states that "we have made our streets safer" but he is disturbed that we have placed too many criminals in prison. What does Mr. Pierce advocate? That we return to a system of rehabilitation and lenient sentences?I am sure Mr. Peirce and his feel-good attitudes toward criminals are welcome in liberal, out-of-touch circles.
NEWS
November 11, 1997
FOR 50 YEARS, ever since mass production and regimented military power carried us to victory in World War II, we Americans have routinely applied standardization techniques to our highways and bridges, our schools, commercial strips and housing tracts.Small wonder so many look so similar -- and boring. And in fact, the standardization has its enforcers. They're the ''professionals'' -- the engineers, planners, fire marshals, public work directors -- who tell the rest of us what's best, safe, allowable to build, from street widths to setbacks to minimum parking.
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