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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 10, 1995
Conservative Peggy Noonan takes a page or two from liberal Bill Moyers tonight in the launch of a new three-part PBS interview series, "On Values: Talking With Peggy Noonan" at 9 on MPT (Channels 22 and 67).But while the former Reagan and Bush speechwriter mimics the formula of Moyers' past chatfests with intellectuals on PBS, she has neither Moyers' easy camera presence nor his skill at playing student to the guest's wisdom.To be blunt, Noonan is a lousy television interviewer. She never gets out of the way of her guest and, at times, she actually seems to be trying to hog the spotlight.
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By Tim Rutten and Tim Rutten,Los Angeles Times | January 25, 2004
A good Hollywood publicity campaign does not stumble over technicalities -- like the truth. Still, it takes a particular sort of chutzpah to put a phony quote in the mouth of Pope John Paul II. But according to the pontiff's longtime secretary and confidant, Archbishop Stanislaw Dziwicz, that is precisely what filmmaker Mel Gibson and his company have done as part of the run-up to next month's Ash Wednesday release of The Passion of the Christ. That film has been a continuing source of controversy, since Gibson adheres to a "traditionalist" sect that has broken with the Catholic Church over the reforms adopted since the Second Vatican Council, including abandonment of the Latin Mass and a complete rejection of any collective Jewish responsibility for the death of Christ, which is the foundation of Christian anti-Semitism.
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By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 1, 1994
Washington--Imagine being a White House speech writer working on President Clinton's addresses for the 50th anniversary of D-Day. Imagine knowing, or at least suspecting, that your very best effort still might be only the second-best D-Day remembrance speech ever.These are the boys of Pointe du Hoc. These are the men who took the cliffs. These are the champions who helped free a continent. These are the heroes who helped end a war.These are the words of Peggy Noonan. Delivered by President Reagan on the 40th anniversary of D-Day, it's a tough act to follow.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Norah Vincent and Norah Vincent,Special to the Sun | June 1, 2003
A Heart, a Cross, and a Flag, by Peggy Noonan. Free Press. 288 pages. $25. For those of us who were there in Lower Manhattan Sept. 11, 2001, it's quite easy to identify strongly with Peggy Noonan's hyperpatriotic, saccharine view of the event, and indeed of the world that that event changed forever. Or, I should say, it was. To some degree, 9 / 11 did for the millennial generation what World War I, the rise of the twin evils of communism and fascism in 1930s, and the unspeakable atrocities of World War II did for previous generations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Norah Vincent and Norah Vincent,Special to the Sun | June 1, 2003
A Heart, a Cross, and a Flag, by Peggy Noonan. Free Press. 288 pages. $25. For those of us who were there in Lower Manhattan Sept. 11, 2001, it's quite easy to identify strongly with Peggy Noonan's hyperpatriotic, saccharine view of the event, and indeed of the world that that event changed forever. Or, I should say, it was. To some degree, 9 / 11 did for the millennial generation what World War I, the rise of the twin evils of communism and fascism in 1930s, and the unspeakable atrocities of World War II did for previous generations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,Special to the Sun | December 9, 2001
When Character Was King: A Story of Ronald Reagan, by Peggy Noonan. Viking. 224 pages. $24.95. Peggy Noonan's What I Saw at the Revolution: A Political Life in the Reagan Era was neither a biography nor a history -- and therein lay its strength. Instead, it was just what its title proclaimed it to be: a vivid memoir by a bright, thoughtful woman who was lucky enough to have been in the right place at the right time, and who had the wit to show us Washington in the '80s through the prism of her own very interesting life.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | October 1, 1995
HAVRE DE GRACE -- Ronald Reagan is 84 and ailing; it seems likely that soon he will be gone. When that happens he will be widely mourned, for to many Americans middle-aged and younger he was the most popular and respected president of their lifetimes.Newsweek, recognizing this and wanting to stay ahead of the curve, has him on its cover this week, keyed to a rather saccharine and condescending piece by Eleanor Clift about the ''long-troubled'' Reagan family and how the former president's illness has brought its members back together.
NEWS
By Linda R. Hirshman | July 19, 1994
THE POLITICAL fallout from the resurgence of the radical right is starting. But nothing will hurt Republicans more than the conservatives' gender war against the female members of their own party. Senate candidate Oliver North, for one, raises money with a letter contending that the political process has been "captured by an arrogant army of radical feminists."For some time, the Republican Party has been casting parts of the American public -- blacks, Jews -- overboard. But gender war is their riskiest strategy to date.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | March 28, 2000
NEW YORK -- We are Manhattan-bound on a shuttle destined to spend as much time on the tarmac as in the air when I ask my seat mate what she thinks of the Senate race. The New Yorker, a former nurse and biotech consultant, instantly begins talking about Hillary. Well, she says, there is the carpetbagger thing. There is the Clinton fatigue thing. There is the first lady as candidate thing. There is the why-didn't-she-leave-the-creep thing. Somewhere over Connecticut this young woman acknowledges that she agrees pretty much with Hillary on the issues.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Rutten and Tim Rutten,Los Angeles Times | January 25, 2004
A good Hollywood publicity campaign does not stumble over technicalities -- like the truth. Still, it takes a particular sort of chutzpah to put a phony quote in the mouth of Pope John Paul II. But according to the pontiff's longtime secretary and confidant, Archbishop Stanislaw Dziwicz, that is precisely what filmmaker Mel Gibson and his company have done as part of the run-up to next month's Ash Wednesday release of The Passion of the Christ. That film has been a continuing source of controversy, since Gibson adheres to a "traditionalist" sect that has broken with the Catholic Church over the reforms adopted since the Second Vatican Council, including abandonment of the Latin Mass and a complete rejection of any collective Jewish responsibility for the death of Christ, which is the foundation of Christian anti-Semitism.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,Special to the Sun | December 9, 2001
When Character Was King: A Story of Ronald Reagan, by Peggy Noonan. Viking. 224 pages. $24.95. Peggy Noonan's What I Saw at the Revolution: A Political Life in the Reagan Era was neither a biography nor a history -- and therein lay its strength. Instead, it was just what its title proclaimed it to be: a vivid memoir by a bright, thoughtful woman who was lucky enough to have been in the right place at the right time, and who had the wit to show us Washington in the '80s through the prism of her own very interesting life.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | March 28, 2000
NEW YORK -- We are Manhattan-bound on a shuttle destined to spend as much time on the tarmac as in the air when I ask my seat mate what she thinks of the Senate race. The New Yorker, a former nurse and biotech consultant, instantly begins talking about Hillary. Well, she says, there is the carpetbagger thing. There is the Clinton fatigue thing. There is the first lady as candidate thing. There is the why-didn't-she-leave-the-creep thing. Somewhere over Connecticut this young woman acknowledges that she agrees pretty much with Hillary on the issues.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | October 1, 1995
HAVRE DE GRACE -- Ronald Reagan is 84 and ailing; it seems likely that soon he will be gone. When that happens he will be widely mourned, for to many Americans middle-aged and younger he was the most popular and respected president of their lifetimes.Newsweek, recognizing this and wanting to stay ahead of the curve, has him on its cover this week, keyed to a rather saccharine and condescending piece by Eleanor Clift about the ''long-troubled'' Reagan family and how the former president's illness has brought its members back together.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 10, 1995
Conservative Peggy Noonan takes a page or two from liberal Bill Moyers tonight in the launch of a new three-part PBS interview series, "On Values: Talking With Peggy Noonan" at 9 on MPT (Channels 22 and 67).But while the former Reagan and Bush speechwriter mimics the formula of Moyers' past chatfests with intellectuals on PBS, she has neither Moyers' easy camera presence nor his skill at playing student to the guest's wisdom.To be blunt, Noonan is a lousy television interviewer. She never gets out of the way of her guest and, at times, she actually seems to be trying to hog the spotlight.
NEWS
By Linda R. Hirshman | July 19, 1994
THE POLITICAL fallout from the resurgence of the radical right is starting. But nothing will hurt Republicans more than the conservatives' gender war against the female members of their own party. Senate candidate Oliver North, for one, raises money with a letter contending that the political process has been "captured by an arrogant army of radical feminists."For some time, the Republican Party has been casting parts of the American public -- blacks, Jews -- overboard. But gender war is their riskiest strategy to date.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 1, 1994
Washington--Imagine being a White House speech writer working on President Clinton's addresses for the 50th anniversary of D-Day. Imagine knowing, or at least suspecting, that your very best effort still might be only the second-best D-Day remembrance speech ever.These are the boys of Pointe du Hoc. These are the men who took the cliffs. These are the champions who helped free a continent. These are the heroes who helped end a war.These are the words of Peggy Noonan. Delivered by President Reagan on the 40th anniversary of D-Day, it's a tough act to follow.
NEWS
October 1, 1992
AMID all the hoopla over Tina Brown's alterations to The New Yorker, Forbes magazine observed its 75th anniversary with an issue that examined why Americans "feel so bad."Writers such as Saul Bellow, Henry Louis Gates Jr., Simon Schama, Paul Johnson, John Updike and Peggy Noonan contributed essays, all of them so well-written and so likely to make the reader feel not simply bad but downright lousy.Here's a small sample from the Updike piece, titled "Where is the space to chase rainbows?":"We sense that the vast 1980s explosion of corporate acquisition and junk-bond floatings was a storm of meaningless activity that left us without the ability to make anything -- this having been, as our schoolteachers used to tell us so proudly, citing Henry Ford and the Wright brothers and Thomas Alva Edison, a nation of makers.
NEWS
By RICK HOROWITZ | September 16, 1992
''I went along with one Democratic tax increase, and I'm not going to do it again -- ever, ever!''George Bush, on a Wednesday.''It wasn't a pledge, no. He was saying, as he's said before, that he wouldn't make that mistake again.''Marlin Fitzwater, the very next morning.''Is that a pledge or is it not?''David Brinkley to Dan Quayle, on Sunday.''You can define it any way you want to.''Dan Quayle to David Brinkley.(Curtain rises on the president and a group of children, sitting in a bedroom.
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