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Peggy Lee

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NEWS
March 31, 2005
MS. PEGGY LEE MITCHELL, 45, of Lobelville, TN died Thursday, March 24, 2005, in Austin, Texas. Ms. Mitchell was born on October 28, 1959 in Baltimore, Maryland to Bill Kidd and Dee Chandler Painter. Ms. Mitchell is preceded in death by her father Bill Kidd and sister Nancy Cairens. She is survived by her mother Dee Chandler Painter, Lobelville, TN, brother Ted (Liz Ridge) Painter, Lobelville, TN, sisters Lyn (Wayne) Kimmel, Westminster, Maryland, Glorya (Carl) Vane, Baltimore, Maryland, Eve (Wayne)
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NEWS
November 4, 2007
Peggy Lee Eldredge, a retired registered nurse, died Monday of pancreatic cancer at her Monkton residence. She was 70. Born Peggy Lee Schoepflin in Baltimore, she attended the old Eastern High School and in 1957 graduated from Church Home and Hospital School of Nursing. She went to work as a nurse for the Salvation Army's Camp Puh'Tok in Monkton, where her first patient was Robert W. Eldredge, who had been thrown from a mule, the family recalled. The couple married Oct. 5, 1958. In the mid-1960s, Mrs. Eldredge began working at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, where she served in several departments, including the emergency room and the recovery room.
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FEATURES
By Peter Goodman and Peter Goodman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 23, 2002
Norma Deloris Egstrom was raised a tough North Dakota farm girl who shucked grain, pitched hay and drove the water wagon, yearned to escape her stepmother's daily beatings, and sang every moment she could. She later became Peggy Lee, the musical epitome of sensual sophistication, a powerhouse pop singer/song- writer, as well as an Oscar-nominated actress, an artist who could entrance a packed Carnegie Hall and seduce listeners in intimate jazz clubs - and she found time to breed prize-winning roses (there's even the Peggy Lee rose to prove it)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2006
Theater Beehive: The '60s Musical -- A musical romp through the songs of 1960s singers, from Diana Ross to Aretha Franklin to Janis Joplin. Tomorrow, Saturday, Sunday and July 6, 8, 9, 12, 14, 16. Showtimes vary. Tickets $18-25. Harold J. Kaplan Concert Hall. Workshops: June 25 - discussion of women's role in 1960s music; July 9 - discussion of Vietnam War's effect on 1960s music; July 16 - discussion of the beehive hairdo's history and Baltimore associations (all free). Gypsy -- Musical based on the life of burlesque dancer Gypsy Rose Lee, her rise to stardom and the dreams of her overwhelming mother.
NEWS
May 8, 2002
Otis Blackwell, 70, who wrote dozens of hit songs, including "Don't Be Cruel" for Elvis Presley, died in Nashville on Monday of a heart attack. Mr. Blackwell wrote more than 1,000 songs, recorded by performers such as Ray Charles, Billy Joel, The Who, James Taylor, Otis Redding, Peggy Lee and Jerry Lee Lewis. Some of Mr. Blackwell's other credits include "Great Balls of Fire" and "Breathless," both recorded by Mr. Lewis; "Handy Man" by Mr. Taylor; "Fever" by Ms. Lee; "Daddy Rolling Stone" by The Who; and "Return to Sender" and "All Shook Up," each recorded by Mr. Presley.
NEWS
November 4, 2007
Peggy Lee Eldredge, a retired registered nurse, died Monday of pancreatic cancer at her Monkton residence. She was 70. Born Peggy Lee Schoepflin in Baltimore, she attended the old Eastern High School and in 1957 graduated from Church Home and Hospital School of Nursing. She went to work as a nurse for the Salvation Army's Camp Puh'Tok in Monkton, where her first patient was Robert W. Eldredge, who had been thrown from a mule, the family recalled. The couple married Oct. 5, 1958. In the mid-1960s, Mrs. Eldredge began working at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, where she served in several departments, including the emergency room and the recovery room.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTER | April 9, 2006
Fever: The Life and Music of Miss Peggy Lee Peter Richmond Henry Holt / 449 pages / $30 Defining moments are hard to identify in a musical career as long and storied as Peggy Lee's, but hers may have come in 1939 while fronting a band called the Guadalajara Trio in Palm Springs. In the audience were Jack Benny and his entourage, whose lively chatter tempted Lee to sing louder and louder in order to be heard. But her voice frayed, losing its essential core. It was then that she discovered, in her words, "the power of softness."
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | August 25, 1994
Singer Ethel Ennis has been compared to Peggy Lee, Ella Fitzgerald and Sarah Vaughan. She toured with Benny Goodman. She has performed on network television. She has been called "the singer's singer," the chanteuse of choice for jazz connoisseurs.Naturally, then, I expected to talk with her about music. But time and again our conversation would move back to spiritual matters.For instance, Ms. Ennis tells me that she believes her strength lies in singing ballads. We were sitting in the living room of her home near Mondawmin Mall in Northwest Baltimore, a modest brick townhouse where she has lived with her husband for 30 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 28, 2003
The so-called "neo-soul" field is already crowded with wannabe-smooth brothers who croon sweet nothings over hip-hop-laced grooves, injecting their sound with heavy Stevie Wonder-isms and Donny Hathaway inflections. A new artist, Javier (pronounced hav-e-air), wants to join the band, so to speak, with a sound that's warmly familiar. Like Glenn Lewis and Maxwell, he sets out to charm the ladies with ballads dripping passion. "I'm an easygoing kind of guy," says the singer, 25, calling from Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2006
Theater Beehive: The '60s Musical -- A musical romp through the songs of 1960s singers, from Diana Ross to Aretha Franklin to Janis Joplin. Tomorrow, Saturday, Sunday and July 6, 8, 9, 12, 14, 16. Showtimes vary. Tickets $18-25. Harold J. Kaplan Concert Hall. Workshops: June 25 - discussion of women's role in 1960s music; July 9 - discussion of Vietnam War's effect on 1960s music; July 16 - discussion of the beehive hairdo's history and Baltimore associations (all free). Gypsy -- Musical based on the life of burlesque dancer Gypsy Rose Lee, her rise to stardom and the dreams of her overwhelming mother.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTER | April 9, 2006
Fever: The Life and Music of Miss Peggy Lee Peter Richmond Henry Holt / 449 pages / $30 Defining moments are hard to identify in a musical career as long and storied as Peggy Lee's, but hers may have come in 1939 while fronting a band called the Guadalajara Trio in Palm Springs. In the audience were Jack Benny and his entourage, whose lively chatter tempted Lee to sing louder and louder in order to be heard. But her voice frayed, losing its essential core. It was then that she discovered, in her words, "the power of softness."
NEWS
March 31, 2005
MS. PEGGY LEE MITCHELL, 45, of Lobelville, TN died Thursday, March 24, 2005, in Austin, Texas. Ms. Mitchell was born on October 28, 1959 in Baltimore, Maryland to Bill Kidd and Dee Chandler Painter. Ms. Mitchell is preceded in death by her father Bill Kidd and sister Nancy Cairens. She is survived by her mother Dee Chandler Painter, Lobelville, TN, brother Ted (Liz Ridge) Painter, Lobelville, TN, sisters Lyn (Wayne) Kimmel, Westminster, Maryland, Glorya (Carl) Vane, Baltimore, Maryland, Eve (Wayne)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 28, 2003
The so-called "neo-soul" field is already crowded with wannabe-smooth brothers who croon sweet nothings over hip-hop-laced grooves, injecting their sound with heavy Stevie Wonder-isms and Donny Hathaway inflections. A new artist, Javier (pronounced hav-e-air), wants to join the band, so to speak, with a sound that's warmly familiar. Like Glenn Lewis and Maxwell, he sets out to charm the ladies with ballads dripping passion. "I'm an easygoing kind of guy," says the singer, 25, calling from Los Angeles.
NEWS
May 8, 2002
Otis Blackwell, 70, who wrote dozens of hit songs, including "Don't Be Cruel" for Elvis Presley, died in Nashville on Monday of a heart attack. Mr. Blackwell wrote more than 1,000 songs, recorded by performers such as Ray Charles, Billy Joel, The Who, James Taylor, Otis Redding, Peggy Lee and Jerry Lee Lewis. Some of Mr. Blackwell's other credits include "Great Balls of Fire" and "Breathless," both recorded by Mr. Lewis; "Handy Man" by Mr. Taylor; "Fever" by Ms. Lee; "Daddy Rolling Stone" by The Who; and "Return to Sender" and "All Shook Up," each recorded by Mr. Presley.
FEATURES
By Peter Goodman and Peter Goodman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 23, 2002
Norma Deloris Egstrom was raised a tough North Dakota farm girl who shucked grain, pitched hay and drove the water wagon, yearned to escape her stepmother's daily beatings, and sang every moment she could. She later became Peggy Lee, the musical epitome of sensual sophistication, a powerhouse pop singer/song- writer, as well as an Oscar-nominated actress, an artist who could entrance a packed Carnegie Hall and seduce listeners in intimate jazz clubs - and she found time to breed prize-winning roses (there's even the Peggy Lee rose to prove it)
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | July 18, 1996
On the radio, there are oldies stations that should sue themselves for misrepresentation. Oldies, indeed. Pat Boone doing white-boy cover versions of Little Richard. Another numbing rendition of Danny and the Juniors doing "At the Hop." The Supremes doing "Where Did Our Love Go?"Actually, since they asked, our love went thataway. Oldies aren't oldies any more, they're hardy perennials, the same narrow, repetitive play list cranked up so many hundreds of times over the past 30 or 40 years that they've lost all power to move us, to remind us of their original emotional connections.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | July 18, 1996
On the radio, there are oldies stations that should sue themselves for misrepresentation. Oldies, indeed. Pat Boone doing white-boy cover versions of Little Richard. Another numbing rendition of Danny and the Juniors doing "At the Hop." The Supremes doing "Where Did Our Love Go?"Actually, since they asked, our love went thataway. Oldies aren't oldies any more, they're hardy perennials, the same narrow, repetitive play list cranked up so many hundreds of times over the past 30 or 40 years that they've lost all power to move us, to remind us of their original emotional connections.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | August 29, 1991
Connolly's Seafood House on Pier 5, an 87-year-old institution of fish frying, closed yesterday to make room for a $164 million center for high-technology fish research.Longtime Baltimoreans said they were shocked and saddened to learn that the so-ugly-it's-beautiful eatery, where stars rubbed elbows with sailors, had finally succumbed to urban redevelopment."It is going to be a loss. . . . It is a clumsy-looking place, but they served good food," said dedicated customer and former Mayor Clarence "Du" Burns.
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | August 25, 1994
Singer Ethel Ennis has been compared to Peggy Lee, Ella Fitzgerald and Sarah Vaughan. She toured with Benny Goodman. She has performed on network television. She has been called "the singer's singer," the chanteuse of choice for jazz connoisseurs.Naturally, then, I expected to talk with her about music. But time and again our conversation would move back to spiritual matters.For instance, Ms. Ennis tells me that she believes her strength lies in singing ballads. We were sitting in the living room of her home near Mondawmin Mall in Northwest Baltimore, a modest brick townhouse where she has lived with her husband for 30 years.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | August 29, 1991
Connolly's Seafood House on Pier 5, an 87-year-old institution of fish frying, closed yesterday to make room for a $164 million center for high-technology fish research.Longtime Baltimoreans said they were shocked and saddened to learn that the so-ugly-it's-beautiful eatery, where stars rubbed elbows with sailors, had finally succumbed to urban redevelopment."It is going to be a loss. . . . It is a clumsy-looking place, but they served good food," said dedicated customer and former Mayor Clarence "Du" Burns.
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