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By Andrea K. Walker | October 23, 2012
Parents who feed their kids an organic diet may not be giving them the health advantage they think. There is no evidence eating organic foods cuts back on the risk of disease over the long-run, the American Academy of Pediatrics said in a report this week. More large studies with human subjects need to be done to determine a link, the group said. Organic foods have the same nutrients, vitamins and proteins as conventional foods, the doctors group found. Pesticides levels are lower in organic foods, but there is not enough long-term evidence to know if that impacts health.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Hip dysplasia may not be obvious in newborns, but the disorder may already be affecting babies' development. And the sooner parents and caregivers get an evaluation and treatment, the easier the fix, according to Dr. Andrew Abramowitz, a board-certified orthopedic surgeon at MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center who trained in pediatric orthopedics. What is pediatric hip dysplasia and how common is it? Hip dysplasia (developmental dysplasia of the hip or DDH) is a spectrum of abnormalities of the ball and socket joint of the hip. It occurs in one in every 1,000 live births.
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FEATURES
By Liz Atwood | November 27, 2012
From Liz Atwood: For years we've heard about the teen and tween girls who have a negative body image. Trying to emulate the unnaturally thin models they see on TV or in magazines, they can starve themselves to death. But a new study shows that not only girls, but also teen and tween boys, can harm their health when they become too worried about their bodies. The journal Pediatrics recently published a study that shows a significant number of boys are using protein shakes and steroids to build their muscles.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
Tooth decay has become a major problem among young children, and pediatric dentists are urging parents to take steps such as limiting sugary snacks and drinks. They also now advise brushing with a small amount of fluoride toothpaste and having a wellness exam at age 1, according to Dr. Norman Tinanoff, chief of the division of pediatric dentistry at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry. How big a problem are cavities in children? Tooth decay in children under age 6 is called early childhood caries by health professionals.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | April 27, 1993
Three years ago, business at an Annapolis pediatric service for children who get sick at night started slowly, with maybe a couple patients a night. But times have changed.On Saturday, doctors at Nighttime Pediatrics on Generals Highway saw 96 patients. On Sunday, it was 108."It's more common now to have two incomes, two working parents," said Dr. Robert G. Graw Jr., a Davidsonville pediatrician who started the practice with eight other pediatricians in December 1989. "Their children are in day care, where they are more exposed to germs.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1999
Dr. J. Edmund Bradley, retired professor of pediatric medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine who became the first head of the pediatrics department there, died Wednesday of heart failure at his home in San Diego. The former Ruxton resident was 92.Dr. Bradley spent 31 years with the university, 17 of them as department head. He retired in 1965.Over the years, the doctor's popularity spread from staff to patients and to their parents, and when he walked through hospital corridors children happily followed him like the Pied Piper.
NEWS
By Baltimore Sun staff | February 23, 2010
The University of Maryland, Baltimore has named Dr. Jay Perman, dean and vice president for clinical affairs at the University of Kentucky medical school and former chair of pediatrics for the University of Maryland Medical System, as its new president. He will replace David J. Ramsay, who announced in June that he would step down as president after 15 years. The school made the announcement as it has been mired in controversy involving a state legislative audit that showed a high-ranking employee received $410,000 in "questionable compensation payments" that were approved by Ramsay.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 25, 2010
Barton Childs, a Johns Hopkins University pediatrics professor emeritus who worked in the field of inherited diseases, died of pneumonia Feb. 18. He was 93. Dr. Childs lived in Roland Park and died at Johns Hopkins Hospital. "We have lost a giant of his or any generation of medicine," said Dr. Edward D. Miller, dean and chief executive officer of Johns Hopkins Medicine. "His medical home was at Johns Hopkins, but his influence was worldwide." Born in Hinsdale, Ill., and raised in Chicago, he was an adopted child.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | April 5, 2007
Dr. Melchijah Spragins, a retired pediatrician who had been chief of pediatrics at Greater Baltimore Medical Center for two decades, died in his sleep Tuesday at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. He was 87. It was Dr. Spragins' charm, wit and comforting demeanor that endeared him to patients and colleagues during his more than four-decade career as a pediatrician. "He took care of my kids, and he treated his patients like they were members of his own family. He was natural, down-to-earth and homespun but very erudite and one in a million.
FEATURES
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1999
This doesn't make sense. Melissa Sparrow is nervous?True, this is a big day. She will be matched with a hospital to begin her residency, the next step in her goal of becoming a pediatrician.But why worry? She's one of the brightest students at one of the best medical schools in the country -- Johns Hopkins. Any hospital would welcome her.The problem is, Sparrow wants to remain in Baltimore. Specifically, she wants to complete her three-year residency in pediatrics at the Hopkins hospital.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
Dr. John M. Freeman, an internationally renowned Johns Hopkins pediatric neurologist and expert in pediatric epilepsy who had also been a medical ethicist, died Friday of cardiovascular disease at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. The longtime Ruxton resident was 80. "Few Hopkins physicians have had a more profound effect than John Freeman on how we treat young patients who suffer from epilepsy and congenital abnormalities - and how we address the often-difficult ethical issues surrounding these potentially heart-breaking cases," said Ronald R. Peterson, president of the Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System and executive vice president of Johns Hopkins Medicine.
NEWS
November 13, 2013
Preschoolers who are 3 and 4 years old are at a developmental point where they are learning about social boundaries ("Tough penalties for young students," Nov. 12). It is a time to learn right and wrong, happy and sad, and time to play or work. Kids who have trouble with these concepts should raise the concern of parents, educators and health professionals. Excluding troubled children from preschool programs denies them the structure and role-modeling they desperately need. Taking a hard look at kids in distress is an opportunity to save a life.
NEWS
October 13, 2013
The House has proposed funding some individual government agencies and programs as a stopgap measure. The American Academy of Pediatrics is asking Congress to reopen the full government. As a pediatrician, if I see a kid coming in with a sore throat and a headache, I don't treat the headache today and say come back in a month for the sore throat. We need a holistic approach because there are so many programs that affect children. There is no one program that is "more essential" than the other.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Heubeck, For The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2013
Josephine Grant never knows what she'll find at her doorstep when she comes home. The biggest surprise came when she returned from school one day last spring to a stack of 10 enormous cardboard boxes, each containing dozens of baby bottles. No one in her family could use them. But nearby, there was a great need for the bottles, and Grant knew what to do. This "hobby" of Grant's started when she was 13. "My little cousin was born with Goldenhar syndrome, was always in and out of the hospital, and never had anything to do while in there," she said.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2013
The mother of a Howard County teenager who died after dental surgery wants to see all pediatric dental procedures that use general anesthesia take place in hospitals someday. But for now, Cathy Garger hopes to shed light on dangers surrounding routine dental visits that she believes led to the death of her daughter, 17-year-old Jennifer Michelle "Jenny" Olenick, and other pediatric patients. Olenick, a junior at Marriotts Ridge High School, died in April 2011, 10 days after losing oxygen during a wisdom tooth extraction procedure at an oral surgeon's Columbia office.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
Donald J. Artes, a Sinai Hospital pediatric respiratory therapist who was known as a skilled clinician and administrator, died May 24 of complications from an infection at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Fullerton resident was 54. "He was a great man for sure. He was an inspiration to everyone at Sinai, and he always had the right attitude and sense of humor, no matter what the circumstances as he faced Crohn's and kidney disease," said David R. Madden, manager of the respiratory department at Sinai Hospital, whom Mr. Artes had hired at the University of Maryland Medical Center in 1996.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | August 10, 2007
Dr. Gino Franco Luigi Zarbin, a Baltimore pediatrician whose love of children was equaled only by his enthusiasm for Alfa Romeo sports cars and model trains, died Monday of cancer at his Hillendale home. He was 83. Dr. Zarbin, the son of a dentist, was born and raised in Vittorio Veneto, Italy, and raised in Milan. Educated at the University of Milan, where he earned his medical degree in 1948, Dr. Zarbin escaped conscription into the German army during World War II when he missed his regular train.
NEWS
June 28, 2006
After-hours center appoints Dr. Kingry Dr. Karen Kingry, a Howard County resident, has been appointed medical director of the new after-hours medical center, Nighttime Pediatrics and adult care too! - Columbia. She recently was medical director of pediatrics programs and chair of pediatrics at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda, where she developed a combined emergency room and inpatient unit serving children in Montgomery County. She also practiced with the Patuxent Medical Group and as pediatrics hospitalist, associate medical director and co-founder of the Pediatric Care Center at Howard County General Hospital.
FEATURES
By Abigail Green | May 28, 2013
Last year the American Academy of Pediatrics recommended that parents not use bumper pads in cribs, citing them as a safety risk. Maryland was quick to respond, and starting June 21, the sale of crib bumpers is banned by the state's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. We turned to Dr. Timothy Doran, chairman of Pediatrics at GBMC, to tell us what every parent of an infant needs to know: What are the risks of using crib bumpers? Babies can get trapped or suffocate or have a SIDS event with them.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
Dr. Paul S. Lietman, a retired Johns Hopkins professor of medicine, pharmacology, molecular sciences and pediatrics, died of congestive heart failure April 20 at his Ruxton home. He was 79. "He was a gifted educator and was beloved by generations of Hopkins medical students," said Dr. Myron L. Weisfeldt, the medical school's chair and director of the Department Of Medicine. "He relished mentoring young colleagues and single-handedly recruited numerous young physicians. " He worked on drug development for HIV infections and herpes and was a pioneer in antiviral treatments, his medical colleagues said.
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